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stella1751
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Show Me Your Home-Made Composters (Please)

I have decided I want to do some regular composting in addition to my annual caged stacks. I am a pack rat--I can never throw anything away--so I very likely have the materials I need on hand to make a cool composter. I'd initially thought I would go with a 5-gallon pail, but want to be open to possibilities. I'd seriously like to see photos of home-made composters so I can get some ideas. Can anyone help?
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Ricky
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www.compostguy.com/videos/nifty-homemade-compost-tumbler

i built 2 of these, they seem to work fine as far as tumbling, have`nt emptied finished product yet, maybe in a couple weeks, bought 2 barrels at surplus store for 15 bucks, had 4x4`s, set them in the ground w/concrete, total cost to me was about 10 bucks ea

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stella1751
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Nifty! Thanks! I'm still playing with ideas. My garden has reached that peak phase where I'm tapped out just caring for it! You planted a seed, though, with this one. It can be done, clearly, and fun can be had while making it :lol:
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smokensqueal
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I have two different bins that are home made. I'll try and get pics posted in the next day or two.

One is just a 55 gallon barrel (plastic, food grade, $8 from the recycling center) I put in a some holes and cut the top. Used and old seat belt as a hing and two latches ($2) to hold it close. After a year of composting I realized I need more holes in the bottom half because no matter what I did it seem to stay a little to wet on the bottom. My last batch worked much better.

The other one I have is a larger bin. I think it's like 3 1/2 ft x 3 1/2 ft x 3 1/2 ft but I'll measure it and let you know. It's made out of old vinyl fencing that my dad use to sell. and about $30 of stainless steel screws and two hinges. It has a lid that flips open and on each side on the bottom two of the slats pull out so I can get finished compost or mix the pile really good.

rot
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pallet bins

..
Simple pallet bins. This phot is a couple of years old.

Not sure how posting this image is going to work out.

[img]<IMG SRC="5_3v3.jpg" WIDTH="852" HEIGHT="639">
..

rot
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image try 2

<IMG SRC="5_3v3.jpg" WIDTH="852" HEIGHT="639">

rot
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image try 3

failed

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stella1751
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Rot, I'd like to see it. The instructions on image posting are in the introduction. I have access to pallets :)
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rot
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not much to see

..
Can't seem to find the instructions.

It wasn't the most revealing photo anyways.

Four pallets pushed together to form a box open at top and bottom. I just tie 'em together with bailing wire like big twist ties.

I'm using the pallet bins for slow as you go on 18 month - two year cycles. Build for six months and let sit for the rest of the time. Water through out the cycles. They sit on pavers on top of bare ground. The worms come up and do their work. If I keep things watered they become worm factories. If I'm lazy, and I'm often am, I get some worms and cocoons. Low labor approach.

I've started nailing window screen to the pallet bins to keep the squirrels out.

I do the hot bins with the plastic mat things rolled up into a cylinder. They have a bunch of holes for air. To turn, I pick up the cylinder and set it down next to where it just was. Then I shovel the contents into the now empty cylinder. They s/b about $25 in the garden store. You can do the same thing with a hoop of chicken wire or some other sort of fencing. Typically with the metal fencing you undo the hoop and pick up and the close it back up again.

Different bins and approaches in on line here:
https://www.compostinfo.com/

Good, straightforward info in the above link.

One of these days I will develop the patience to figure out how to post photos.
..

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Diane
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I had to go to photobucket to get any pics to work.
It was quick and easy after that.
It took less than an hour.
Gardens are a little bit of heaven on earth.

https://s600.photobucket.com/albums/tt87 ... G00047.jpg

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stella1751
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I think somone should invent a mini-composter, something a person can use to make just enough compost for compost tea. When I was a kid, many, many decades ago, we got our milk straight from the farmer, in huge 5-gallon steel buckets. Mom strained the cream from the top, poured the cream into quart jars, put the lids on, and gave each kid one to shake while we were watching television. Once the butter was formed, she shaped it into pretty patties.

I was thinking about that the other day ago. It stands to reason that something similar would work for compost. Because my current composting method takes a long time and reaps huge quantities of compost, I am trying to devise a plan to make some quickie compost for tea. Just as you can tailor your tea to satisfy your plants' needs, so you should be able to tailor your compost. A little of this, a little of that, and you have two or three handfuls on compost in two or three weeks, all ready for tea. I suppose I'm dreaming :lol:

I wonder whether there is a simple household device, something no larger than two gallons, that shakes continually. Oh. How about one of those paint shaker machines? I wonder how much those cost.
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stella1751
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I've Got It!

After reading my own posting :lol: this morning, I googled "mini-composters." I found a site showing teachers how to incorporate a sense of composting in the classroom by using a two-litre plastic bottle.

I went shopping this morning for organic corn meal (bought corn flour instead) and organic molasses. While checking out the sale section, I found some gallon jugs of juice for sale. The jugs are a lightweight plastic with a handle. The opening is large enough to pour everything in. If a person filled this jug 3/4's full of compostibles and soil and shook it regularly, by the end of two weeks, there should be exactly enough compost for a pot of tea!

I bought four. Now I guess I should get busy drinking the juice :shock:
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top_dollar_bread
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Re: I've Got It!

stella1751 wrote:After reading my own posting :lol: this morning, I googled "mini-composters." I found a site showing teachers how to incorporate a sense of composting in the classroom by using a two-litre plastic bottle.

I went shopping this morning for organic corn meal (bought corn flour instead) and organic molasses. While checking out the sale section, I found some gallon jugs of juice for sale. The jugs are a lightweight plastic with a handle. The opening is large enough to pour everything in. If a person filled this jug 3/4's full of compostibles and soil and shook it regularly, by the end of two weeks, there should be exactly enough compost for a pot of tea!

I bought four. Now I guess I should get busy drinking the juice :shock:
stella i remember i gave you a link ,in the hot compost topic, to a web site that gave instructions on building small bins.

[url]https://cwmi.css.cornell.edu/chapter2.pdf[/url]
The soda bottle was one that the link mentioned
any way i got me a new composter, i took a composting class and got me the garden gourmet
[url]https://www.gardengourmet.com/[/url]
Got it for 20$ :lol: and its working nice.
Im also building a another composter that is also in the link. They call it a two can bioreacter??i plan on composting in a old laundry basket, sitting in my old garbage can composter.
Ill show photo's of what it looks like when i build it.
And i got a vermicompost up and running, you should check it out..

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Diane
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Stella, my compost is ready in less than a month.
I have it on the ground under a tree. I cover it with trash barrel covers because it rains a lot here and it looks better. Covering it may help to heat it up also.
When I screen I wind up with two sink tubs full of compost. I also have lots of chunky compost left that I then use to start a new pile.
I turn it whenever I add new scraps, two to three times a week. I move it, put the new scraps down then cover them.
The piles are not large, about 2-3 feet wide by 2-3 feet high.
Gardens are a little bit of heaven on earth.

https://s600.photobucket.com/albums/tt87 ... G00047.jpg

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If you want quick compost, the key is to make the ingredients smaller. So I'd say get a used blender or food processor and chop up anything you want to add to the compost into a slurry, mix with X-shredded paper (or have a kid thoroughly jump on a bag of dry leaves).

Mix in some bokashi to speed things along (yes TDB you mentioned it somewhere else, and I have heard of it. and Although I haven't actually purchased the entire kit, I've used the inoculant in my compost pail during winter to help things along) Bokashi, I believe is anaerobic and will work well for your jug composting. How that would affect or the resulting culture would perform in the AACT, I'm not sure, but maybe it will help to feed the aerobic microbes?

Stella, put bokashi in the search box, I remember a discussion about it from last year in which a link to homemade bokashi inoculant recipe/video was posted -- basically wheat bran, molasses, and something else that had to be purchased.

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stella1751
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I like that, Diane. I have another experiment in mini-composting going, one with 2' nursery pots, those big flat-bottomed straight-sided black things with four holes on the bottom sides. I started it last week, adding stuff to one nursery pot until I had it full. I tried stirring it, but my chunks were too large, so now I dump it each day into a different nursery pot. I had heat one day, but I think that might have been the sun :)

Anyhow, once it was full, I began a new one. I'm working on filling that one now. On the first one, I had to work to find compostibles to fill it. I can relax on this one. I don't need to worry about filling it when the other one is working on becoming compost.

Our weather has been cold the past two days. I wonder whether that is a factor in my lack of heat or whether I didn't get enough browns in the first one.

Speaking of which, I turned one of my monstrous, 4-ft diameter, 4-ft high annual piles yesterday. It was cool at the bottom and FULL of worms. I kept grabbing handfuls of 'em and chucking them in one of my squash beds. I think my next compost tea will be using this layer of compost, anyway :lol:

What would be cool about a mini-composter in a one- or two-gallon jug is that we could take it in the house. We could add our compostibles right there, in the house, under the sink. If it's sealed with the lid, we could compost in the house, shaking it regularly, dumping it when it's done, and starting over. By winter's end, northern garden beds could be slathered in a layer of compost, all ready to be turned for planting.

I got online yesterday and looked for the perfect in-home mini-composter. Ideally, I want four clear-plastic, wide-mouthed, 2-gallon jars. Now that I know what I want, I just have to find it. Any ideas?
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stella1751
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top_dollar_bread wrote: stella i remember i gave you a link ,in the hot compost topic, to a web site that gave instructions on building small bins.
TDB, is my face red. I missed this posting and responded to Diane's instead. :oops: Yeah, I didn't check your cool hyperlink. I forgot. I was probably reading your other hyperlinks. Yesterday I read the 163 compostibles (I think that was yours), which was great and which I have questions about; the day before I was occupied with Applestar's Greensand, which I still haven't finished. And so on.

So, sorry I missed reading the composter one. I got distracted. I wish I had joined this forum last winter. All this great reading, and all that great fun outside!

I did have two questions for you:

1) Do you (or anyone else) compost kitchen stuff that isn't organic? I think the following link came from one of TDB's posts. [url]https://www.plantea.com/compost-materials.htm[/url] I read it while I watered something yesterday, printing it off and carrying it around with me. I was especially intrigued by the stale cereal (in my case, a whole box of Cheerios) and the old pasta (yes, got it on sale in 1998).

2) While I was shopping for organic cornmeal and organic molasses, I found a whole great organic grains section at my grocery store. I almost bought organic brown rice flour, just because it sounded very scientific, what with its "gluten-free" proclamation. There were also some organic seed-like things that started with Q, like Quianos, or something like that. So, what do you know about ground grains and their merits in compost and compost tea?

Oh, one more question (sorry): If a person is composting a small amount, just enough for a batch of compost tea, couldn't that person compost all the ingredients, except for the molasses? Could I chuck in some kelp meal and cornmeal, too?

And, I bought cornflour instead of cornmeal because they appear to be processed the same way with the exception that flour should be more easily dissolved. Is that sound or unsound reasoning?

Poor TDB. If anyone wants to jump in all these questions, please feel free to do so! And TDB, I've got enough reading for now. I can't keep up with everything I've got printed off. (I'm only to page 15 on Applestar's Greensand, and that's pretty fascinating material. I think I will carry it with me outside today :lol: )
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top_dollar_bread
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Stella
I cant take credit for the 163 compostables link, good read by the way..
i had a few, can this be composted questionable ingredients that were listed ther =)
Stale cereal (in my case, a whole box of Cheerios) and the old pasta
When I took my composting class, I was told not to add these. When I asked why not, the instructed said the oil and sugars that these sometimes have will slow down ther decomposing rate and that they may also attract vermin. (so if ther isn’t oil or sugar, no worries)

Among cereal and pasta, she mentioned not to add bread, but me being me, I did any ways.

What I learned is, all you have to do is add these vermin attracting ingredients, to the center of your compost and cover them up a nicely..

i did not see any decrease in decomposing rate and I had a bit of a ant problem but that was from letting bread sit on the top of the bin. (the ants left by the way)

also off topic but thought id mentioned, worms love and I mean love, bread and pasta. My wormbin worms were all over the bread and a fellow vermicomposter told me they love left over pasta and cereal too. (try adding some worms, if you got any)

I love my worms!!!
So, what do you know about ground grains and their merits in compost and compost tea
To be honest, nothing really… I think corn meal is a ground grain?? And I have used that in tea’s. (but not any other grains, in tea)

but pop corn, flour, oats, rice are grains can all be composted, again though if they have any oils, they may attract some vermin or they may be slower to decompose.

Burry them in the compost, the wormer/deeper the hole you burry them in, the better.
If a person is composting a small amount, just enough for a batch of compost tea, couldn't that person compost all the ingredients, except for the molasses? Could I chuck in some kelp meal and cornmeal, too
Doesn’t matter if the compost is small or big, adding any soil amendment (alfalfa, comfrey, bone/blood meal, guano, manure, finished compost, corn meal, coffee grounds, etc) will all feed and help grow the microbes.

Just keep the c/n ratio in check and you should be fine.
Oh and if you got dry powdered molasses, im pretty sure you can add that to compost… or do what I do and give the compost heap a dose of tea..
And, I bought cornflour instead of cornmeal because they appear to be processed the same way with the exception that flour should be more easily dissolved. Is that sound or unsound reasoning
sounds reasoning to me, good idea by the way,
I think I might start looking for corn flour now

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stella1751
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Thanks, TDB! You answered all my questions. If you were told not to compost the cheerios, pasta, and bread, I think I'll avoid them. Each year, I become more and more aware of what organic means. I find myself flinching at calling my produce organic if I know any chemical has contributed its growth. Wish those Cheerios were Shredded Wheat :lol: I'll have to study the ingredients on the pasta, though. I'm pretty sure chemicals contributed to the making of the bread. Pasta, though, might be okay.
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My composting system involves three parts:

1) a 2kg plastic tub (emptied peanut butter tub) in my sink, which fills up quickly. Several times daily I transfer the contents to:

2) a 12.7 KG pail with a lid (currently I have two) on my balcony, which is right next to my kitchen. Once these two pails are full, I then carry them down to the yard, where I dump them...

3) ...in one of two piles in my garden, and bury the scraps with soil to keep pests away. The two piles are a) new scraps, and b) partially composted scraps (this second pile is the one I take from when using the compost in my garden). Once or twice a week I turn each pile with a shovel, ensuring the scraps are again covered when I'm done, and I water the piles when I water my garden.

This works for me. It's all about systematic convenience... I've tried bigger tubs in my kitchen but it gets too messy, and I've tried eliminating the pails on my balcony but then I'm too busy to walk all the way down to the garden and grab a shovel (MUST bury or cover scraps that are outdoors).

Anyhoo, this works for me!

a0c8c
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Man, I must be the laziest composter. I'm going the more "natural" route, aka I didn't build a bin or anything. It's more of a pile than anything, but I get good compost even though it's 90% leaves. Here's some pics.

(Even too lazy to move the hoses and piece of plasic trashcan before the picture, which is now moved)
[img]https://i26.tinypic.com/117g47c.jpg[/img]

And yes, the wall is cinder blocks, bricks, rocks and tree bark. Like I said, Lazy
[img]https://i30.tinypic.com/jhsdj6.jpg[/img]

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stella1751
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I'm getting a real kick out of composting on a small scale; a big thanks to everyone who is helping me get started! My big compost bins are not nearly as much fun. Ingredients are layered by the hundreds of pounds, literally. When I have something small, I frequently just run it through the garbage disposal rather than make the walk out to toss this .00001% worth of organic material on these monsters.

Today I removed the dead heads from my moss roses. Normally, I just chuck those back into the bed. This time I took a 2-cup measure with me and filled it with dead petals. When I tossed this on my little compost heaps, it looked like I had made an addition. Had I tossed it on my big compost heaps, it would have looked like I had wasted my time. It's all in perception. That mini-pile of dead leaves blown into a corner now looks pretty good; before this experiment, I found it of little interest :D

I like these black nursery pots, by the way. Each day, once or twice a day, I dump them into an empty one. I now have two going, one I add to and one that's working on becoming compost. Once I fill the second one, I will start a third. They are composting, albeit slowy. I am going with the smaller chunks recommended by (I think) Applestar, and that sure helps! I think I'm going to continue to play with these for a while, see how they work.

I know it should be on the ground, but my dogs will eat it if it doesn't have the clear boundaries of a plant. It took me several years, but they now know they can't eat stuff that's in a container :lol:
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gixxerific
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I just use a trash can for now. It works good but..... You can't really use it till it's all done unless you dump it all out to get to the bottom. I keep adding to it so it really won't get all the way done. I will just save it for next season, no big deal I get by alright. I have been thinking about doing a normal pile in the yard somewhere. Not sure if I wan to do that I could stink out my neighbors.

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stella1751
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I've been thinking about a0c8c's method. I have some very old 2x4's lying around and two crooked 4x4's. If I cut the 4x4's into 8 2' pieces, I could have four across the back, spaced 2.7' apart, and 4 across the front. It would be 8'x4'x2', with an 8'x2' back and 2 4'x2' sides. I could run one 2x4 across the front, at the bottom, and side-separaters 2' high in the middle. I'd have three 4' long x 2.7' wide x 2' deep sloping bins, kind of like a0c8c's, easy to turn, easy to fill.

While one was filled, I could start on the next, and so on. By the time the first one was done cooking, I could dump it on the garden and begin a new one. The dogs would probably stay out of it :roll:

I could put it against the fence opposite my kitchen door. It would be convenient to run scraps out to it. Best of all, it wouldn't take up too much space, and I could play with compost on a small scale. That's what I'm thinking, anyway.
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compost bucket

I have a plastic bucket that the bulk kitty litter comes in, maybe 2 gallon size that just fits under my sink. Actually I have two of them, one open for recyclable cans and bottles and one with a tight fitting lid for compost. Having it right there under my sink means every little scrap gets composted, nothing goes in the garbage disposal. And I do mean everything. I'm vegetarian, so there aren't any meat scraps, but bread, cereal, pasta, dairy, coffee filters, paper towels, anything organic. I've never had any trouble from any of it.

When the bucket is getting full or too nasty, I empty it into the big compost pile outside and cover it with a good layer of leaves, weeds, whatever I have around. But the stuff in the bucket usually heats up pretty good, before it ever gets to the pile, so it's probably partly broken down already.

(gixx) My compost pile is open, but it does NOT stink. The stuff in the bucket can get pretty nasty in the summer, but once I put it on the big pile and it gets aired out and covered up, no more smell. The idea of trash can type composters is usually batch composting. You fill it up, let it sit with occasional rolling around until it's finished, then dump it out and start over with a new batch. But that means you have to have another pile somewhere accumulating until the composter gets emptied.

I basically have two piles all the time, one that I'm adding to and one that's finished that I'm taking from...

a0c8c
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I'm glad you like my style Stella. It works great, and it's based of my Dad's compost bin just lazier. He did what you are thinking of, and built bins out of wood. He's got two piles like I do as well. The one on the left is my quicker compost where I through all my table scraps in and the one on the right is filled with more sticks and branches and thus composts slower. I get one that's ready fast for the first dose of food, and then one that is ready a month or two later for the plants next good feeding. Mine'll be quicker this time though, as the half of each pile was form leaves and stuf I moved from the side of the house where they've been sitting under trees since fall. Half of what was added was already 50% composted so I got a head start with these new piles. The bad thing is, I have another side of the house lined with trees that I left all the leaves at(nothing ever grows there anyways) so I could easily double or triple my compost piles, and then I'd have way too much, especially considering I have very few plants.

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smokensqueal
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I know I'm a little slow at getting the pics up but here are my home made compost bins.
[img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3148/3838527964_59254d4906.jpg[/img]

[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2424/3838531150_b19e6773fc.jpg[/img]

[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2479/3837745919_0b00130eec.jpg[/img][/img]

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stella1751
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Smokensqueal, those are way cool. Honest. How did you make them? (Now that I've 90% decided what I want to do :roll: )
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smokensqueal
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The barrel was very easy. It's a simple 55 gallon barrel, food grade barrel. I took a cutting tool and just cut off the top. Used a old seat belt as a hing and two latches. The latches have a loop on them that I put a bolt in so I can roll it around. I then drilled holes in it at random. My first batch was way to wet no matter what I put in it so I drilled a lot more holes in the bottom half.

The large bin was a bit more complicated. My father use to sell vinyl fencing and had a number of pieces left over from demos and jobs. The front and back I made out of square posts. The lid was made from round posts that I cut in half. and the sides were made from planks. on the bottom I just added a half square post to make a place for two planks to slide up and down. This is all put together with stainless steel screws and for the lid I used two hinges for a wooden fence door.

They both seem to work fairly good. I would of changed a few thing on the big bin if I had to do it over but I'm happy with what I have. It does what I need it to do. I'm planning on getting another barrel and do the same thing to add to my mix.

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gixxerific
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Re: compost bucket

rainbowgardener wrote: (gixx) My compost pile is open, but it does NOT stink. The stuff in the bucket can get pretty nasty in the summer, but once I put it on the big pile and it gets aired out and covered up, no more smell. The idea of trash can type composters is usually batch composting. You fill it up, let it sit with occasional rolling around until it's finished, then dump it out and start over with a new batch. But that means you have to have another pile somewhere accumulating until the composter gets emptied.

I basically have two piles all the time, one that I'm adding to and one that's finished that I'm taking from...
Yeah I hear ya. My last place had a great spot about a 6'x6' area I threw everything. I haven't quite got it pegged how to do it here though I have some ideas. Never fear one day I'll have a great spot I hope.

Or get 2 trash cans!? :roll:

Smoke you got quite the setup there. Oh to have a wooded backyard or a field. Something that would aloow me to do what I want with out worry or regret. :cry:

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Diane
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My set up is just like Rainbows. I have a small container in my kitchen and I even have my kids trained to throw peels and things into it.
My pile doesn't smell. I always put new scraps into the middle or if I'm turning the pile, on the bottom.
I only had a smell problem once when it got too wet. That's why I covered it with barrel covers. But even then just mixing it up fixed it.
Gardens are a little bit of heaven on earth.

https://s600.photobucket.com/albums/tt87 ... G00047.jpg

top_dollar_bread
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Re: I've Got It!

top_dollar_bread wrote:Im also building a another composter that is also in the link. They call it a two can bioreacter??i plan on composting in a old laundry basket, sitting in my old garbage can composter.
Ill show photo's of what it looks like when i build it.
And i got a vermicompost up and running, you should check it out..
I finally got to making my new small compost bin or 2 can bioreactor :roll:
it was real easy and free, the laundry basket was old, sitting in the garage and the trash bin was my old composter.. all i did is drill holes and started to layer my materials

[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2671/3842872902_4f01c38ea2.jpg[/img]
@ the bottom of the trash bin, i added a old planting rack..this will help keep the laundy basket above ground, increasing drainage and air flow. then i drilled a few holes in the laundry basket, took maybe 2 minutes tops
[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2462/3842872854_d3f744a42a_m.jpg[/img][img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2432/3842872930_eeb55e9caf_m.jpg[/img]


from here i started to add the brown and greens..I find it best to always start with browns and that if you use large pieces of cardboard or sticks, you help aerate the bottom of the compost better.
I beleive that this helps prevent the microbes at the bottom of the bin from going anaerobe...edit
[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2554/3842872820_6c1f7b2e84_m.jpg[/img]
for browns, i use ripped pieces of empty organic amendment boxes, to start....then switched to shredded paper, soaked in ACT.
For greens, i used saved garden clippings, dry cow manure, and starbucks coffee grounds.

[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2447/3842082197_0b1a724012_m.jpg[/img] [img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3461/3842873214_eae50b64cc_m.jpg[/img] [img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2661/3842873062_c263246885_m.jpg[/img] [img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2658/3842082269_d75b66c4a0_m.jpg[/img] [img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2529/3842873254_84a37c78e0_m.jpg[/img] [img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3534/3842082447_15ef14990c_m.jpg[/img]
[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2526/3817666589_2fde461e90_m.jpg[/img] [img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2567/3842083503_a173f9eb86_m.jpg[/img] [img]https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3533/3808306106_15b9b7ca44_m.jpg[/img]

for every brown layer i add a green layer 1/3 its size, this is what works for me..
i only filled the bin half way, i needed more browns..so i toped it off with dry cow manure watered down will ACT.
by the way all the ingredients are all free and more then likely will give me a nice manure based finished compost.
[img]https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2559/3842873320_a5f2a589b1.jpg[/img]
sorry i went picture crazy, just thought it was good :idea:
Last edited by top_dollar_bread on Sat Aug 22, 2009 5:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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stella1751
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Never apologize for going "picture crazy," TDB! That makes it so much more comprehensible :D Good stuff in this posting, as always.
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

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gixxerific
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That is a great idea TDB. You did what I did but "EXTREME" (to be said in loud rumbling voice) :lol:

I had a 4" PVC pipe laying around that I drilled several 1\2 inch holes in. I that put that in the middle of my trash can composter thingy for aeration.

I have not drilled any hole in my trash can yet, i noticed most people have. Should I do this or is that big of a deal. I notice it is normally smell free til I give a good shake that a little rotten smell comes out. It has been layered pretty well green\brown.

top_dollar_bread
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Location: Inland Empire,CA

gixxerific wrote:That is a great idea TDB. You did what I did but "EXTREME" (to be said in loud rumbling voice) :lol:
................
I have not drilled any hole in my trash can yet, i noticed most people have. Should I do this or is that big of a deal. I notice it is normally smell free til I give a good shake that a little rotten smell comes out. It has been layered pretty well green\brown.
To me its the little things that count (drilling holes, shredding/soaking paper, etc). I think the holes are a good idea, may not be a big deal but wouldn’t hurt. I explained how i try not to let microbes go anaerob in my compost.
ONLY anaerobic conditions leach N,P or S gases, the gasses that make our compost smell rotten. So its best to do what ever you can to not let compost or compost tea fall under reduced oxygen levels.
So IMO drill those holes gix!!!

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Diane
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I like your idea of wetting the paper. I tear it up but still see it for a while.
Gardens are a little bit of heaven on earth.

https://s600.photobucket.com/albums/tt87 ... G00047.jpg

a0c8c
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Drilling holes can also help make sure it's not too wet and let worms in.. I wish I had a nice composter like that, but all I have is small room sized trashcans to use, so I only get small batches of quick compost and my slow two big piles.

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gixxerific
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a0c8c wrote:Drilling holes can also help make sure it's not too wet and let worms in.. I wish I had a nice composter like that, but all I have is small room sized trashcans to use, so I only get small batches of quick compost and my slow two big piles.
I've been planting this and that recently and some of the worms I find go in the compost can. Gonna make a tea maker in minute so while the drill is out might as well make my trash can full of holes. Or maybe I grab my 9mm and shoot some holes in it, yeah that will be more fun. :lol:

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stella1751
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Here's What I Am Trying Now

Shortly after starting this thread, I decided to play with some black nursery pots left over from my container gardening experiment. At first, it just plain wasn't working: no heat, all anaerobic decaying rather than aerobic composting. Very disappointing. However, I think I went overboard with the soil used at the beginning. I found that the more compostibles I added, the higher the heat. This morning, one of my "compost bins" was quite warm!

Here's what my set-up looks like. Ignore the background. There's no way of making that long story short. My backyard is a work in progress :oops:

[img]https://i801.photobucket.com/albums/yy292/mitbah/compost_1.jpg[/img]

Twice a day, I add more compostibles to each bin and then dump the contents into the top, which then becomes the bottom. Today I am adding some window-well leaves. Oh. The one with the green plant cover on it has five cans of expired tuna fish in it. That is five cans too many for one of my dogs to resist, as you can tell by the look on his face :lol:

[img]https://i801.photobucket.com/albums/yy292/mitbah/compost_2.jpg[/img]

Anyway, I like this. I'm going to stick with it. I do have a question for those of you who are mechanically inclined: Does anyone sell some type of a clip I could use to clip top and bottom together? I wouldn't need to use the plant cover if I could somehow fasten the pots together between additions :shock:
"Imagination is more important than knowledge." -- Albert Einstein

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smokensqueal
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It looks like both pots have a lip around the top edge. You could possible just drill 4 holes around them and insert a bolt and nut contraption to hold it together.

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