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CharlieK
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Posts: 163
Joined: Sat May 17, 2008 8:32 am
Location: Covington, LA USA

Can I add Watermelon Vine to my Compost?

Okay, new question. I live in Zone 9 on the Gulf Coast but grass clippings are gone and they were my best source of "green" material. I used mostly a bale of hay I bought from my feed store for "brown" material. My compost has been going since early Spring and is beautiful with earthworms and everything.

Now my question
A month ago, a watermelon vine sprouted off of my patio from eating out there and spitting seeds. It has grown to about a eight foot vine and very healthy looking, flowers even, but no fruit at this late date. Can I chop this thing into 12" segments and add it to my compost?

Another follow on question for people in these temperate zones
Do I continue to turn my compost every week or should I cover it with a tarp and just wait for Spring?

This forum has answered most of my questions just from reading but I could use a little help here! :D
I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Addison

rot
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Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 5:15 am
Location: Ventura County, CA, Sunset 23

Out here in so cal I just keep turning through the winter. I'm not sure where Zone 9 is but if you get any freezing temperatures, the compost will start again when it warms up again should the freeze last long enough to freeze the entire pile. I'm thinking on the gulf coast it's a non-issue.

Here we get some good over night lows to the mid 30 regularly and turning at night then slows things down. Stick to turning on warm days and don't worry about turning less frequently because that will help retain any heat you've got going. Maybe it takes a little longer - not a major disaster.

I can't imagine why cutting up the watermelon vine wouldn't be OK to toss in the bin or pile.

astevn816
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Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Oct 16, 2008 5:35 pm

Watermelon Vine

Yes cut up the vine, it should be an wonderful addition to the compost pile.

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CharlieK
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Posts: 163
Joined: Sat May 17, 2008 8:32 am
Location: Covington, LA USA

Thanks, I'll get right on cutting it up. Yes, Rot, your climate sounds very similar to ours so I will carry on! You guys are great! :D
I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Addison

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smokensqueal
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Joined: Thu Jun 26, 2008 5:36 pm
Location: St. Louis, MO Metro area

Most of the time the only reason piles slow down over the winter is the lack of greens not because it's to cold. If you pile is big enough just keep working it as before. In times that it is very cold you could go longer with out turning. In any way you do it it's not going to hurt anything.

rot
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Posts: 728
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 5:15 am
Location: Ventura County, CA, Sunset 23

The pile or bin is just going to loose more heat in the cooler temperatures of the season. Turning also means loss of heat but more air. There's a balance there somewhere. I'm just not going to stress it. It will rot if slower.

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CharlieK
Senior Member
Posts: 163
Joined: Sat May 17, 2008 8:32 am
Location: Covington, LA USA

Okay, it is on there and I don't think I'll have any problems. It rarely gets below freezing here. Thank you guys, very much!
I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs. Addison

Grunta0
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Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Nov 26, 2008 10:24 pm
Location: Oz

Obviously I don't know your circumstances but if you have a car and trailer (or access to them ) and live anywhere near a racecourse or horse stud then you can normally get manure and straw from them.

They usually have plenty and are glad to get rid of it. :P
I'm so unlucky I couldn't win a kick in a street fight.

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