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tomf
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I always hear happy people are more health. Could it also be health people are happier as being not health can make you miserable?

I do feel attaude effects health, I feel a good laugh makes me feel better.

Green Mantis
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tomf..............I really believe HAPPY people do live longer, plus people with things to look forward to.

I told my husband I wanted to die at the auction ( livestock) with the last bid, LOL!!! His comment was, Oh great, leave me to pay the bill!!! Ha.

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tomf
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GM; do you have a ranch?

Green Mantis
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Did, and want to again, although, even living in town doesn't seem too much difference to what comes home at times. :oops: I'm not good at sitting on my hands at auctions!!!! :roll:

dirtyfingers
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Haven't been around lately but just happened to see this topic.

I retired about four years ago at age 58 and just started collecting Social Security bennies this year. What bums me out is that my financial guru said that I could have actually retired at age 55! Oh well, but I highly recommend it! :D

lily51
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I retired in 2009 at the age of 58. It took me 5 minutes to adjust!
One thing that is important is having interests, things to do and people to see. I have to say I love my life. Such a different pace!
Once a month the retirees from my school get together for breakfast...you've never seen so many smiling faces.

One thing I have observed is that we come with a 50 year warranty. Seems health issues pop up around that age, often from things we did or didn't do in the first 5 decades. Hopefully,it takes just a minor repair or re-adjustment. Unfortunately, some of my friends have encountered some very serous ordeals. Most have met the challenge and are still here.

Thanks to all for your tips for healthy lifestyle :)

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Runningtrails
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People I meet think we are odd. hubby and I both just work part time at little jobs that we enjoy. We have never subscribed to the "work hard all your life so you can spend the last quarter of it doing nothing." We are semi retired now, and have been for a decade, although both are in mid 50's now and it's not because we have money. We don't have any money at all.

We deicded to go that route years ago and downsized our life to do so. Success in life is not measured by the amount of material possessions and financial worth one can accumulate before one dies. We don't need all that crap if we have to go work at a job every day to achieve it.

Who needs to work all day, every day? I'm sure you can look at things you are paying for now that you could live without, if it meant you didn't have to work much. You'd be surprised how much "stuff" you can live without or make/grow/recycle yourself.

Now, whenever we think of something we might pay for, we determine if we really want it enough to actually go to work to pay for it. We own very little. lol!

-But our time is our own, we spend our spare time doing whatever interests us, and that's a lot. We have many home businesses that started out of being involved in our "interests". We keep them small and interesting and say no when we want to, so we call ourselves "semi retired" and will probably live like this until we are very old, The Lord willing...

If I had to get up every day and go work at a stressful job somewhere just to live, I think at this point, I'd probably rather not...

You may drive a Jag, but I own my car :-) when we are driving at all. I walk to work whenever possible and refuse to work anywhere that I can't walk to.

Dolly Freed is my hero! (A little extreme, but a 'must read' for anyone wanting to be more self sufficient!)

You would be surprised how many people get mad about this when I tell them why I don't work. After they talk to me for awhile, they usually become resentful and frustrated with their own lives, usually because we are so happy and satisfied with our life together and most people are not. We are not searching for anything. We have found it.

Retirement? When is that?

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digitS'
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Runningtrails wrote: . . . You may drive a Jag . . .
I may drive a Jag? No, I drive a Dodge pickup and once in awhile a Toyota. The Dodge has more years than the first vehicle I ever owned, back in the '60's. (Of course, cars get a few more miles than they did then :wink: .)

Actually, I know a couple people who own Jags. The 1st is your typical retired rich guy. He has a house that must be well over 3,000 square feet with several thousand feet of river frontage. His garage is easily big enuf to hold that car and 4 others.

Really, I've only met the second guy with the Jag. He is (or was) the boyfriend of someone I've known for many years. Her mother is a dear friend of my wife's.

We've been seeing the young lady a lot the last week. She just had a baby - 2 months early! The baby is still in the hospital. Grandmother has to be away taking care of some other grandchildren so her daughter is recovering at home, essentially alone. We have provided a meal each day thru this week. C-sections take some time to recover from . . .

The boyfriend with the Jag? He did show up from California but only just in time for the birth. I think he will drive off to the south in just a little while. He wasn't around for the last 2 months of pregnancy, anyway.

No job for him here but I kind of doubt if there's much for him in California either. The Jag isn't new but he'd better get the h**l rid of it!

You and I, friends, are paying for that baby's hospital stay.

Steve
sorry, I need to edit this: the 1st car I owned was made in the '50's. I owned it in the '60's.
Last edited by digitS' on Sun Nov 27, 2011 12:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

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rainbowgardener
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I'm semi-retired too! And I love it. I took early social security at 62 and cut my work hours down from 60 a week as a manager over five offices, to a half time service provider. Cut my income to less than half as well. It means I may never be able to totally retire, but I love my life the way it is.

It's how I have time to do all the things I write about here (as well as spend time on my computer!).

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Runningtrails
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I used "Jag" as an example. I only know one person who has an actual Jag.

Rainbowgardener, we are planning on taking early the Cdn equivalent of social security too and soon. We will have to work at little part time jobs most of our lives, but we love it too! Unless one of our home businesses really takes off, then we'll do that. or win the lottery... :lol:

Charlie MV
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Most people who think they're drivin' around in a Jag are actually in a Ford. But Ford is great at marketing. :D

DoubleDogFarm
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Charlie MV wrote:Most people who think they're drivin' around in a Jag are actually in a Ford. But Ford is great at marketing. :D
So that's why every time I drive by reflective windows my Jag looks like a 1995 F150. :P


Eric

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Well hubby and I are trying to figure out what to do once we EVER sell here.
It was supposed to be a heated storage building for vehicles ( was for about 7 months) but this year we want out of here! We can't stand living in town, plus we are still too far away from my husband's job. Gas is too darn expensive.
I want to rent a cheap place that will let us have some chickens, a good garden, a workshop for my husband and not to close to neighbours!!!!

We are looking to get life back on a MUCH simplier track. Growing most of our own food again, eating GOOD eggs, raising some good meat birds for the freezer and taking life much easier.

This past year has been extremely stressful trying to sell in a depressed market, still haven't sold, but sure have had to drop the price a LOT.

A lot of things we THOUGHT we were going to do aren't probably going to happen. Our daughter and her youngest son moved back to Armstrong B.C. about 2 months ago.

Unfortunately, she didn't save for the move, as any other move was with us and we always paid. Her oldest boy is living with us now, but is working, which helps. But I must say, and this sounds awful, BUT I'm really glad she did go, and has her hand out of our pocket finally!!!!

Although she still has to pay us back quite a lot for the move. As she had not saved for it.

Don't get me wrong, I love my kids, but we didn't help her grow up by trying to help her and the boys. The help cost us a huge amount of money over the last 16 1/2 yrs. But we have now learned, that the ones that matter the most, at our age 62 and 63 are US. So we will be living the way we want finally on very little, as I just don't have the urge to buy anything un-necessary anymore.

If it something that is a definate must have, as in repairs etc. then we will search for the best prices going. Auctions, garage sales etc. for some other things that might become needed.

When we get sold here, our realitor has found us a place that we can possibly caretake. The rent would be very little. Which would give us a chance to save as much as we can. Plus IF my husband wants to he can work a couple of days a week, after he's 65. So we have still got a lot of decisions to make, but at least by listening to all of you on here, it really helps to get ideas. Real good ideas!!! Thanks everybody. :D

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rainbowgardener
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If you are seriously interested in being caretakers, it might be worth it for you to check out The Caretakers Gazette https://www.caretaker.org/

You have to subscribe to it for $30 a year. It is basically classified ads of caretaker positions. From their description of themselves:

"You can enjoy rent-free living as a property caretaker in desirable locations. Positions on estates, mansions, farms, ranches, resort homes, retreat centers, camps, hunting and fishing lodges, vacation homes, private islands, and any other kind of property imaginable are listed in The GAZETTE."

On their websites you can see samples (with all the contact info removed from the listings) of issues from previous years to get a feel for what kind of positions are listed. There are positions from every state in the US and a lot of places around the world. Some of them are watching over some remote wilderness property miles from anything. Some of them are managing someone's third home (mansion) in some resort location (some of that kind of thing you need training for). It was my thing to dream on for a number of years.

I was a caretaker for nine years, for my church. The church (Quaker Meeting) is in an old mansion on 5 acres in the city. My s.o. and I lived in generous sized two bedroom apt. on the second floor there rent free, all utilities paid, paid only our private phone line, in return for doing a lot of the routine work around the place. I loved it!

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digitS'
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You may want to talk with those realtors who manage rentals, Green Mantis. I'd guess that some folks needing caretakers would likely turn to them.

Have we talked about it before? You seem to be wanting to return to a place in BC where I had intended to move to as a young man. I'm kind of glad I didn't get there. Couldn't happily take any colder weather than here but, especially, wouldn't enjoy any greater winter darkness. Your present home would be completely beyond the pale!!!

Here's an article that talks about seniors moving back into the cities from the 'burbs.

https://nyti.ms/s0tlO9

I may be seeing that here. There are vacancies most everywhere so it is hard to know. Rural vacancies are risky for home-owners.

Steve

Green Mantis
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digitS", and Rainbowgardner...............Thanks so much for your thoughts and suggestions.
Talked to the realitor this afternoon and asked him about a smallish older home, pretty much in town, but on the less built up area, if that makes any sense?? Bigger lots, not quite such a close house density. He has the place listed and apparently the woman is always up for trades, as long as she gets the better of the deal.

In this case it would be even, I would say. She doesn't feel her place will sell at that price for a couple of years, pretty much the same here, only it would sell for more.

So might see about a trade? But not taking some ridiculous trade either, just can't afford to do it.

We thought if we rented that place out and lived in that other place caretaking, we might come out ahead a bit. We hope!!!!

When we first moved out here we bought in a hurry, big mistake. It really was too far out, and we lost big time on that because of it, so digitS", that article really summed that place up. Nobody wants these places, they are just too far from towns.

The place we may be able to caretake ( basically checking buildings, keeping people out of buildings, and off the property) is only less than 2 miles to town. So the commute to work for my husband would be great.

Plus it's fairly private, and I could grow a big garden and raise chickens etc. SO we are REALLY hoping it works out.

But selling real estate has become a real challenge, so guess we have to get inventive, and try trades, and hope the right one works out.

Yes digitS" it was me you were talking to on this site. We dearly would like to move back to the Interiour, but prices are too high right now.

They are out here too, but people don't seem to want to come down? We have noticed though that a lot of these sellers are elderly grain farmers, that bought up lots of land, some with houses on it, subdivided them off and now have them up for sale at inflated prices. Seems to be, if they get their price fine, if not it just sits there for sale. There seems to be a lot of people out here like that, which makes it hard, for people like us.

But we have to keep perservering, as this place is driving us crazy!!!!!! It is SO not us at all. What ever went through our minds when we bought it I have NO idea, but I think we must have had heat stroke, in the cold spring???? YIKES!!!!!

Hopefully others have ideas on what steps you would take if you were us??? WHY is it so easy to see others mistakes, and not your own???

I want to see mine, not someone else's. Ah the Joys of trying to sell, NOT!!!!

Arkansas
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thanrose wrote: My clients are all geriatric, the oldest 100, youngest is early 60s. I have paid out of my pocket or driven to a doctors office on my day off, or dropped off hard copy prescriptions for C-II drugs or antibiotics because one of my patients was in desperate need and family was too busy to be bothered.

As a nurse, I will not subject myself to the degradation of having my less than competent peers care for me. I'm kinda liking the ice floe set adrift method myself at the moment, but it is hot now and we do still have some ice floes somewhere around the globe. Hypothermia is not such a bad way to go.

See, living life in an area where I'd have to do some mountain climbing, eating wild edibles, windsurfing, or spelunking, hey and maybe some cliff diving (my fave), would decrease my life expectancy and enhance the enjoyability of what life I do have.
My hat's off to you for your kindness. My heroes have always been those who were kind to the overlooked.

I never balked at receiving care from less than competent staff. It's the mean ones, the ones that don't want to be bothered that break my heart. And sad to say, they are the majority, but that's just life.

I'm 55 and recently cut back from 2 jobs to one and feel semi-retired. Life is good!

You could do worse than Arkansas for cliff diving, spelunking and mountain climbing. This state boast the highest mountain between the Appalachians and the Rockies. Plus cost of living and home prices are lower than most. Let me know if I can ever help!

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digitS'
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Well, since this thread came up again . . . I'll just post a thought that occurred to me today:

Do you suppose that there are 2 Ages to Life?

The Lithic Age, as in lithe and lithesome, and,

the Lithic Age, as in stone

? :? ?

Steve

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digitS'
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Since the topic of retirement came up again - I thought of this thread!

I saw so much good advice in it, it was really good for me to read over it again.

Updates! Last summer I only lost 7 pounds!!!! I knew that I wasn't working hard enuf! Anyway, it is now winter and I've put it back on :oops: .

Second update: (And it isn't an updated SSA chart linked on the 1st post!) I came across some new info from the SSA. It doesn't have to do with specifically male or female . . . together, we, boys & girls, might be living a little longer now than that dated chart shows.

Unisex life expectancy at age 65 in 1980 was 16.3 years. The 2012 Trustees Report indicates that the estimated unisex life expectancy at age 65 for 2010 was 18.7 years. (pdf link)

Of course, those 2.4 years over the last 30 years of the nation's history are what gives some folks fits - but, that's another story.

Steve

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rainbowgardener
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For SSA purposes unisex, everyone lumped together makes sense. For the rest of us, sorting the data out is revealing:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/2011/022.pdf

1900 - 2009 is 109 years of data!

Over that period, everyone lumped together has gained 31 years of life expectancy at birth, 6 yrs of remaining life expectancy at age 65 and 2 yrs of remaining life expectancy at 75. So unlike what I would have expected from what we hear about centenarians, most of the change is likely in infant and child mortality, especially comparing to 1900.

But the equivalent figures for women is 32, 5, 1.5 and for men is 30, 5 and 2.

So looking at life expectancy from birth, men have actually fallen farther behind, but again more of that difference is at earlier ages. As well as infant and child mortality, it may reflect excess deaths by accident and violence compared to women.

Interestingly, African-Americans continue to have lower life expectancies than white, though they have gained considerably in life expectancy at birth. But the longest life expectancies currently (they apparently didn't have early data) are among the Hispanic population.

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digitS'
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Well, I never thought to look to the CDC for that information, Rainbow.

Thank you.

"Causes" seems to be more of what the CDC would be about but determining the "prematurity" of the occurrence - they'd need a base-point or, whatever that might be called.

Steve



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