tedln
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I love the Korean style with a lot of spicy pepper in it. I really didn't know there were different styles. I like it made with big chunks of Bok Choi or Asian cabbage.

Ted

WinglessAngel
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yes there are many diff styles and some can be made at home, but I don't suggest trying it, it takes a lot of time and effort and unless you have a large enough barrel or clay pot for it, which is hard to find, its not worth the effort easier to buy from a store lol

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lorax
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Location: Ecuador, USDA Zone 13, at 10,000' of altitude

Bah, making Kim Chee is only as difficult as making Saurkraut! The process is very similar.

Then again, I can just go to the market and buy large clay vessels for not much money (they're used for making Chicha, a sort of mild corn beer), so I've got the advantage of easily available fermentation chambers. I've got one dug into the soil behind my washhouse with a batch of Napa cabbage souring in it at the moment - then I'll aji pepper the living snot out of it, hot-can it, and sell it to my spicy-toothed Ecuadorian friends and clients.

WinglessAngel
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thats great lorax, I don't have that luxery nor do most of us lol but to find a great recipe for traditional korean kimchi to actually make it even if I was or anyone else for that matter able to find the pots needed (and u need a special type of clay pot for making kimchi) most of us are pretty well out of luck unless we have a great great korean grandmother stashed somewhere lol

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lorax
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Location: Ecuador, USDA Zone 13, at 10,000' of altitude

Well, I do have the advantage of my Korean-Ecuadorian friend Anita, whose great-great grannie from North Korea handed down the recipe to her....

tedln
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Lorax,

I always enjoy your comments. keep it up.

Ted

WinglessAngel
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LOL I was adopted so I don't have that luxery, I'm jealous! ive always wanted a recipe for homemade kimchi and none of the one's I have found even stack up to traditionally made :(

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lorax
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WE, PM me. I'll gladly share Anita's great-great-gran's.

WinglessAngel
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aww thanks message sent!

mangoes2020
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Diamond Pearl Food Basmati Rice

I ate the best long grain basmati rice today and I would be glad to share this with the world. Diamond Pearl Long Grain Basmat is the best rice.

I give you the instructions in order to cook this rice.



1 cup of diamond pearl basmati rice

2 cup of water

1 table spoon oil and a pinch of salt.



For best results soak rice in cold water for 2-30 minutes before cooking.



* Rinse measured rice 1 to 2 times to remove extra starch and drain.

* Place the drained rice,water, salt and oil in an open pan and bring to boil on hight flame. Stir occasionally

* As water reduces below rice leve, lower the flame, place a tight lid over the pan and let the rice cook in the steam for 18 minutes. Fluff with fork and serve.

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rainbowgardener
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I like to saute my rice in oil first, with whatever seasonings I'm using. Saute, stirring, over med-high heat until the first grains start to pop. Then add HOT water, lower heat, cover tightly and cook til the water is absorbed.

Sauteing it first seals the grains so they stay all separate and makes it very flavorful.

tedln
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I like your idea RBG. I never thought about sauteing the rice before adding the water. If I remember correctly, my goal in starting this thread was finding a way to cook rice without it turning into a big sticky glob of starch. Out of curiosity, what spices do you add to the rice? I haven't tried it yet, but I want to boil the rice in chicken stock to see how that taste works.

Ted

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rainbowgardener
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Sometimes nothing but salt, if the dish it will be served with is spicy. Sometimes some saffron and/or turmeric. Sometimes I cook it with my homemade soup stock instead of water. The soup stock is all my veggie cooking scraps simmered up and is flavored with onion skins, garlic skins and ends, etc. Sometimes a little bit of whatever might be in the dish it is going with like basil or curry, but light.

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cherishedtiger
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Location: Sacramento, California

ok, so this is an older post, that obviously been answered but having a husband from a Malaysian family tends to make one learn how to cook rice in a hurry.
Hubby prefers a dryer rice, he cant stand sticky or wet rice. So when I cook rice its usually 1 part rice to 1 part water (I typically add a splash more water just for my benefit).
I also have a rice cooker since its a staple in my house.
How I make rice nightly:
2 cups rice
2 1/4 cups water
stir (so rice doesn't turn into a hard block)
add salt (never use a specific amount, just grab the shaker and give it a few good shakes)
turn on rice cooker, walk away wait for it to beep and tell me its done.
Poof perfect rice. :)
You can rinse the rice, my husband prefers this, as it removes "rice dust" and generally makes it taste a little better, but I am usually cooking a million miles a minute and don't opt to do this.

RyNJ
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Location: West Central NJ, Zone 6B

If I'm just cooking rice (no seasonings or anything added) I do what my Chinese friend and his mom do. Rinse the rice first. Put your rice in the pot, and put your pointer finger in so it rests on top of the rice. Then add enough water to come up to the joint on your finger that's closest to the rice. Add a little oil or butter and salt, bring to a boil uncovered, reduce to very low and cook covered for 20 mins.

I don't like measuring, and I always hear all kinds of different proportions for rice anyway, so I do it this way. It's always worked for me (don't know how much of a difference bigger or smaller hands would actually make, though).

john gault
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Location: Atlantic Beach, Fl. (USDA Hardiness Zone 9a)

I do a lot of long distance hikes on the Appalachian Trail and my main dinner meal is a rice stew. I carry with me various dehydrated veggies and chicken/beef jerky and mix it into the rice along with garlic (which I don't dehydrate since it's keeps on the trail). I basically cook it the same way as normal cooking, except that I add more water than needed so it's kind of soupy when done, that way the cleaning is far easier. When done properly it is very tasty. However if you overcook the veggies, I.e. throw them into the mix too early it's kind of bland.



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