tedln
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How to cook rice?

This isn't a recipe or a request for a recipe. It is a "how to" question, so I think it will fit in this forum instead of the recipe forum.

Growing up in North Texas, the starch of choice was potatoes. Rice was used as one ingredient in rice pudding. After spending fourteen years in Louisiana, rice is now one of my staple starches of choice. You eat rice with everything in Louisiana and they have more rice based recipes than bar-b-que sauce recipes.

I prepare steamed rice often, but my normal method is one part rice to two parts water. Bring the water to a boil with a teaspoonful of oil. Dump the rice in the water and cover with a lid. Romove the pan from the burner and allow to sit for fifteen minutes. I've tried just about every kind of rice you can find in a normal grocery store and it always comes out of the pan like a soft, gelatinous glob.

I prepared an oriental fried rice dish for dinner this evening with vegetables and pork. As usual, I had to break the glob into smaller globs and finally into individual grains as it cooked. Is there a way to cook rice or a type of rice that doesn't result in one big rice glob?

Ted

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microcollie
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If you're stirring the rice as it cooks, that may be the problem. I use 1-1/2 to 2 cups of water per 1 cup of rice 9depending on the variety. Rinse the rice first to remove any loose starch (or many rice manufacturers use talc when processing) and drain well. Put rice and water into a pot with a tight-fitting lid (or I do it in a 350 degree oven if I happen to be baking at the same time, so I use a baking dish with a tight lid). No oil or fat at this stage...Dress your rice after it's cooked. Bring to a boil, then turn to a very low simmer. Leave alone for 20 to 35 minutes (again, depending on the type of rice. If you think it's done, remove the lid and, without stirring, listen for water sizzling at the bottom of the pan. If you hear it, put the cover back on and continue cooking. All of the water should absorb into the rice. When it's done, leave covered for another 10 to 30 minutes while finishing the rest of the meal, then stir to fluff. The last step lets the moisture redistribute so the bottom isn't soggy.

All that said, it might take a few tries with your rice of choice to get the timing and amount of water down, but then you'll get good rice every time.

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1.5 to 2 times whatever amount of rice you're cooking.

Wash rice but not too much. The saying is you don't want to wash away the nutrients. I wash it mainly to remove excess starch and whatever impurities might be in there. But careful not to wash too much or under too strong rushing water.

Dump it in the water with a splash of olive oil (optional) then bring it all to a boil. Once boiling put a top on it and reduce to about position 2-3 on your stovetop. On my stovetop, at my altitude, with the cooking untensil I use, the optimal setting is 2. Yours may be different. Cook covered for 25 minutes.

At 25 minutes remove from heat and let sit for around ten or so minutes. Should be fine. If the bottom is brown then that means the heat was too high or there wasn't enough water, but I usually attribute it to too much heat and that works out. If the rice is too gelatinous then that means you put too much water.

Never, ever, remove the top while the rice is cooking.
Last edited by webmaster on Mon Jan 17, 2011 8:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

DoubleDogFarm
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Ted,

This is the rice I buy most of the time.
https://dealnay.com/1208770/niko-rice-calrose-10-pounds.html

I like my rice sticky, so I don't rinse.

2 cups rice to 3 cups water. No salt or oil. Cover, bring to a boil, then turn down to the lowest setting on your range top. I have a propane stove, so I place a cast iron skillet between the burner and rice pot during this stage. 20 minutes. Do not remove the lid during this 20 minutes. After stir and rest.

This is sticky so chopsticks can be used. Next day it is dry enough and will separate for fried rice.

Eric

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Sure, sneak in before me. :lol:

tedln
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Eric,

I love sticky rice in many dishes, but not always.

Microcollie,

Can you identify a few types of the rice you described and the appropriate use for each.

Roger,

You and I use the same basic method and our altitude is similar. I believe mine is 350 ft. I even purchased an automatic rice steamer/cooker once. It still came out like a glob. I tend to believe my biggest problem is in the type of rice I use. It seems the basic choices in most grocery stores is between short grain and long grain. I normally choose long grain.

Ted

gumbo2176
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Re: How to cook rice?

[quote="tedlnI've tried just about every kind of rice you can find in a normal grocery store and it always comes out of the pan like a soft, gelatinous glob.

I prepared an oriental fried rice dish for dinner this evening with vegetables and pork. As usual, I had to break the glob into smaller globs and finally into individual grains as it cooked. Is there a way to cook rice or a type of rice that doesn't result in one big rice glob?

Ted[/quote]


Ted, my rice of choice for jambalaya and fried rice dishes is, without question, Uncle Ben's Converted rice. It cooks up nicely and doesn't come close to globbing together. I'm not a fan of sticky rice with the exception of Sushi rice. I make a mean pot of Jambalaya and the rice never gums up and the grains stay moist and loose in the pot. I've gotten many questions from folks that make jambalaya as to how I keep the rice from sticking and Uncle Ben's is the key.

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Several years ago, I got lazy and bought Zojirushi Neurofuzzy electronic rice cooker with fuzzy logic as a birthday present for myself. When I was still working for a scientific research institute, there was a very intelligent scientist working on fuzzy logic theory so I knew about the concept. I'm sure there have been advances in the technology since my rice cooker model would be considered older now.

I prefer Japanese style rice and this is a Japanese manufacturer so it may or may not produce the kind of rice you are looking for, but it IS a very good rice cooker. One reason I didn't reply right away was that I have forgotten the proper rice to water ratio since I now rely on the measuring cup that came with the unit and the internal water measure printed inside the inner pot. :oops:

I ONLY cook organic brown rice unless I'm desperate. Brown rice never turns out as sticky as white rice. I recently made a made-from-scratch curry stew for a pot luck and made organic Brown Basmati rice using the same rice:water as the short-grain. it turned out very unsticky -- could not pick up a clump with chopsticks -- but delicious. I believe prior to cooking, I added a lump of butter and a pinch of my saffron from the garden as well as a piece of Konbu.

tedln
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Gumbo,

Yes, we also enjoy uncle bens brown rice. Our favorite is any dish with "wild rice" which I don't believe is truly a rice. I've never thought Uncle Ben's seemed quite right with Cajun gumbo or red beans and rice. Other Cajun dishes seem okay with Uncle Ben's.

Applestar, you amaze me! "I used a pinch of saffron from the garden"? Out of curiosity, is there anything you haven't tried? I thought saffron blossoms grew in South Asia. Do you pull the stamens and dry them?

I didn't even know anyone made a rice cooker with built in fuzzy logic though it does seem perfectly logical since cooking rice seems to have so many variables.

I will ask my question a different way. What difference does it make in the final dish by using long grain or short grain rice or Basmati or some other type of white rice?

I grew up with two families of Chinese who spoke no English. I learned their culture by observation and picked up some of the Chinese language in the process. They cooked their rice by starting it in a double boiler in the morning. It would steam in the double boiler all day and we would eat it in the evening. The best part was the hard crust of rice that would form on the inside of the pot. The kids, including me; would fight for the crust. That was the best rice I've ever eaten and I've never been able to duplicate it. (the potatoes as a starch came later)

Ted

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Hi Guys,

I'm Chinese and rice is our staple diet.

The easiest way to cook rice is to use a rice cooker , available from most oriental stores.

Rinse your rice ( about twice ) to remove excess starch. Then, put just enough water to cover a flat hand placed on the surface of the rice in the vessel containing the rice. Cook in the rice cooker by just pressing the"ON" button. It will cook for about 20=25 mins and then stand for 10 minutes before it switches off automatically.

That's modern day rice cooking.

Now, back to the old days.

Wash rice in a heat proof vessel that will fit into a large pot.
Place enough water with washed rice to cover a flat hand placed on the surface of the rice.

Place the rice vessel onto a steaming rack in the pot/saucepan containing enough water for the steaming process .

Bring the water in the steaming pot to boil, turn down to medium heat and steam for 20-25 mins. ( Ensure that there is sufficient water in the steaming pot) .This serves as a double boiler.

Turn off heat and allow to stand for 10 minutes for the rice to " settle".



You should have rice cooked to perfection.!
Very Happy

I find brown rice takes a wee bit more water.

Another tip.

Don't discard leftover rice. It can be resteamed and even be used for Chinese Fried Rice by adding stir fried veg and even bits of cooked sausage or meat and egg.!

Bon appetito folks.!

Lotsa love,

Farmer Bob

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froggy
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I've always used the 1 cup rice 2 cups water method. 1/2 tsp of salt, no oil. I boil it with initial stirring, until the water is just above the rice surface, then I turn the heat down/off. It is done when you look at the rice and it has 'holes' in the surface.
If I am cooking without a lid I usually add 1/2 cup of water to compensate (no matter how much rice I am cooking).

While I was living in Europe (Switzerland and Germany) I never had a problem with rice sticking, I actually had to buy special rice (Arborio or Vialone - short grain rice) to get it to stick.
No washing it or anything.

Now I am in Canada and all rice has this powder on it. I was surprised when told I had to wash it :o - it helps, but I find it being wet makes it sticky also. The best results I am getting is with parboiled rice, it's not quite as clingy.

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lorax
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I eat rice quite frequently as well - both "whole" (brown), and "gold" (partially hulled, my absolute fave - not the GMO with extra beta-carotene :shock:) When I can get it, I eat copious amounts of red cargo rice - that was my rice of choice in Canada, but it's difficult to find here. If I could get seed, I'd so be growing that.

Brown rice is best for fried-rice things, since it will never sticky up no matter how long you cook it. At my altitude, it's one cup of brown rice to 2.5 cups water. I rinse the rice gently, then pop it in the pot with the water and whatever flavouring I want (I'm very fond of dried Suellius luteus mushrooms, a pinch of cumin, and a pinch of saffron), NO OIL OR FAT AT ALL, and then bring this to a slow boil without stirring. Once it's on slow boil, I reduce the heat and let it simmer until all of the water has been taken up (about 1 hour). This then gets dumped into the frypan with a bit of sunflower oil or butter and the veggies, and tossed until it's all nice and the veggies are that emerald green colour.

Gold rice, which is probably what I eat most, is a no-rinsing rice because I get it either straight from the peladora (the hulling station where domestic rice is processed here) or it's rice that I've hulled myself. It's moderately sticky, and although on its own it's delicious, I usually cook it chicken stock. 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of stock is the usual, but I cheat it a bit for my altitude and use a generous 2 cups, and then the same process used for brown rice. I've also had great luck soaking this type of rice in coconut milk with crushed peanuts, overnight, then popping it in my mini rice cooker with whatever liquid is left over. That produces very fluffy rice.

This said, I rarely eat just rice as my grain/starch side dish. I normally throw in at least a handful of washed Quinoa as well - it imparts a nutty flavour.

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microcollie
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tedln wrote: Microcollie,
Can you identify a few types of the rice you described and the appropriate use for each.
My staples are brown rice and wild rice (not really a rice when you get down to it, but a grass). These almost never get sticky, but are heartier than some dishes want.

Basmati and Jasmine are two of my favorites, but with a sweet, nutty flavor. Basmati is best boiled like pasta then drained and put back on the stove to dry. Jasmine has a slightly more firm texture, but by nature is a little more sticky.

Arborio rice is the one to use for risotto...I've never really tried cooking it any other way.

Sushi rice (not sure of the real name there) is shorter=grained and highly starchy and sticky to make it hold together. It's also great for rice-based fritters and burgers because of its stickiness.

My first post was in reference to Carolina rice, my go-to white rice with mild flavor and delicate texture,

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Applestar, you amaze me! "I used a pinch of saffron from the garden"? Out of curiosity, is there anything you haven't tried? I thought saffron blossoms grew in South Asia. Do you pull the stamens and dry them?
:() I can't help it, If the descriptions give me reasonable confidence that I should be able to grow it, I'm bound to try at least once, especially if it's something that has good to excellent chance of tasting good
:-()... Easily -- Uh -- INSPIRED!! That's the word I'm sticking with :>

Saffron crocus is pretty easy to grow, actually, though winter hardiness is somewhat borderline for me. Just pluck out the stamens and dry --no special trick to it at all. :wink: Just be sure to get the corms from a reliable source as other autumn crocuses are toxic.

Now, I have a question for Lorax: How do you thresh your rice?

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lorax
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applestar wrote:Now, I have a question for Lorax: How do you thresh your rice?
Thresh? Nah, I'm old-school. I go out into the field with a flat basket and a machete, and cut the stuff by handfuls just below the fruiting head, then lay the cut heads into the basket. Then I winnow and whatnot on a cement patio with a large cheese mold thingie I found at the market (sort of a really fine mesh strainer-basket-thingie) on a windy day. I lose a few grains this way, but since they generally land back in the rice paddie area and resprout, I'm really not too concerned by it.

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The best way to cook rice is the same as cooking dandelions, okra and Brussel's Sprouts ....... DON'T

Go find something edible instead. IMO

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jal_ut wrote:The best way to cook rice is the same as cooking dandelions, okra and Brussel's Sprouts ....... DON'T

Go find something edible instead. IMO

I always say, anyone who doesn't like Brussel Sprouts just hasn't found anyone who knows how to prepare them right. :wink:

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Brussels Sprouts

The aphids like them. They can have them!

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jal_ut wrote:The best way to cook rice is the same as cooking dandelions, okra and Brussel's Sprouts ....... DON'T

Go find something edible instead. IMO
I totally agree with this, jal_ut! :lol:

tedln
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I love everything Jal mentioned with the exception of the dandelions. I think I may like them, but I'm never sure which part of the yard the dogs visited last when they performed their required bodily functions. I remember a former President who didn't like broccoli. He actually detested it. I never could understand that because I think it tastes great when prepared properly.

Ted

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some peoples genetics make them taste green veggies as very bitter I'm glad I don't...mmm brussel sprouts ,simmer 20 min in 1/4 cup water, finish cooking 5min with REAL butter and choped haselnuts :wink: fantastic

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manofthetrees wrote:some peoples genetics make them taste green veggies as very bitter I'm glad I don't...mmm brussel sprouts ,simmer 20 min in 1/4 cup water, finish cooking 5min with REAL butter and choped haselnuts :wink: fantastic
That's almost like I make my brussel sprouts, only I first cook them and then I sautée them in butter in the end together with the nuts.

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Re: How to cook rice?

gumbo2176 wrote:[quote="tedlnI've tried just about every kind of rice you can find in a normal grocery store and it always comes out of the pan like a soft, gelatinous glob.

I prepared an oriental fried rice dish for dinner this evening with vegetables and pork. As usual, I had to break the glob into smaller globs and finally into individual grains as it cooked. Is there a way to cook rice or a type of rice that doesn't result in one big rice glob?

Ted
ted, I am south korean and I usually eat a lot of rice and its hard to fine one that is a good cooker that doesn't get blobby like that lol, but unless I specifically buy short grain sushi type rice, for that express purpose...I only buy jasmine long grain....perfect for cooking and does not get globby as long as u don't lift ur lid or anything....for every cup of rice 1 and 1/3 C water and in every pot (not per cup of rice) throw in a pinch of white sugar (yes I said sugar LOL) boil your water and sugar first then add the rice and boil for one minute, whether you rinse the rice or not before cooking is up to you, personally I don't feel its worth the time or effort....lower your heat to low, slap on a lid and let cook until rice grains are soft enough to eat...usually 15-20 mins depending on a persons preference...the rice grains stay sticky enough to hold together with a fork or chip stick, but you don't get a blob of rice thats either soupy or mushy...:)

Ted, my rice of choice for jambalaya and fried rice dishes is, without question, Uncle Ben's Converted rice. It cooks up nicely and doesn't come close to globbing together. I'm not a fan of sticky rice with the exception of Sushi rice. I make a mean pot of Jambalaya and the rice never gums up and the grains stay moist and loose in the pot. I've gotten many questions from folks that make jambalaya as to how I keep the rice from sticking and Uncle Ben's is the key.[/quote]

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oh and also if you can find it, hard to find unless at an asian market usually, red thai rice is a long grain rice that cooks similar to jasmine, but takes longer, think a brown rice type, its a bit nuttier in flavor but even better for you, more fiber and it does the most amazing thing when it cooks, the water turns purple! very interesting and neat to look at...but this type of rice takes about the same water to rice ratio as jasmine and yes if I can find it I still add the pinch of sugar to the pot...but it takes about 25 mins to cook to the right level of doneness, but so worth the effort and time!

also something I learned from my mother (I was adopted and she was not asian) take your leftover rice the next day and have breakfast with it! pour milk over it to just cover and throw in a few spoonfuls of white sugar and break it up, makes a great filling breakfast cereal and lots of carb energy to start your day, deff not for carb concious eater though LOL I find for the making it into breakfast cereal though white rice is better, my mom used to do this as she didnt like rice, but I love it this way also....can be warmed up I guess but I like it cold with cold milk :)

tedln
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Another "don't eat" that jal_ut mentioned is okra. I love okra just about anyway it is cooked so long as it is fresh okra. The frozen okra simply doesn't work for me. One of my favorite dishes is fresh okra with the stem ends removed (to tough to eat the stems), boiled with stewed tomatoes. I usually drain off the mucus like broth from the okra before adding the tomatoes. It is for me the perfect balance of acidic and sweet flavors. I haven't tried it, but I bet some jasmine rice cooked as winglessangel suggests would be a good side dish with the okra. I totally understand why people do not like okra. The cooking broth is really gross and unappetizing. I also prefer okra slices in a cornmeal batter, fried crisp, over popcorn if we are watching a movie on television on a cold winter night.

Ted

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ted, have u ever tried pickled okra? LOL sounds strange and unappetizing but to me I love it, I wont eat okra any other way...but it has to be crisp okra pickles, the soft ones are gross and mushy, ick! lol...but that and not to get off topic but pickled green beans and pickled garlic is awesome! ok I'm done ranting about food, now I'm hungry LOL

tedln
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I love pickled okra and pickled asparagus. I'm trying to think of something I don't like pickled. Maybe pickled pigs feet, I haven't tried them and probably wont.

Ted

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LOL u can have it all u want, I'm staying away from pickled pig's feet, but if u already like pickled asparagus and okra, u will prob like picked green beans and garlic, oh and I forgot some people even pickle watermelon, never had it though, sounds interesting enough :)

tedln
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Pickled watermelon rind is really good as is pickled green tomatoes. I love Kim Chee though it is fermented rather than pickled. It is sour and has a pickled taste. I've eaten the watermelon rind pickled with a lot of sugar and it tastes like sweet and sour candy.

Ted

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sounds good then to me lol and what asian style kimchi have you had? as just every asian style of cuisine has their own, my own fav is the one of my own heritage, makes sense right? lol, but traditional Korean kimchi is made similarly but it is served cold and should be bright bright blood red, and I mean red! reason being is that it is a very very spicy kimchi and its one of my fav snacks, if I can find an asian market and then if I find one, if they have Korean kimchi and not the other types lol....seeing as I am NE Ohio kinda hard to find lol

tedln
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I love the Korean style with a lot of spicy pepper in it. I really didn't know there were different styles. I like it made with big chunks of Bok Choi or Asian cabbage.

Ted

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yes there are many diff styles and some can be made at home, but I don't suggest trying it, it takes a lot of time and effort and unless you have a large enough barrel or clay pot for it, which is hard to find, its not worth the effort easier to buy from a store lol

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Bah, making Kim Chee is only as difficult as making Saurkraut! The process is very similar.

Then again, I can just go to the market and buy large clay vessels for not much money (they're used for making Chicha, a sort of mild corn beer), so I've got the advantage of easily available fermentation chambers. I've got one dug into the soil behind my washhouse with a batch of Napa cabbage souring in it at the moment - then I'll aji pepper the living snot out of it, hot-can it, and sell it to my spicy-toothed Ecuadorian friends and clients.

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thats great lorax, I don't have that luxery nor do most of us lol but to find a great recipe for traditional korean kimchi to actually make it even if I was or anyone else for that matter able to find the pots needed (and u need a special type of clay pot for making kimchi) most of us are pretty well out of luck unless we have a great great korean grandmother stashed somewhere lol

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lorax
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Well, I do have the advantage of my Korean-Ecuadorian friend Anita, whose great-great grannie from North Korea handed down the recipe to her....

tedln
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Lorax,

I always enjoy your comments. keep it up.

Ted

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LOL I was adopted so I don't have that luxery, I'm jealous! ive always wanted a recipe for homemade kimchi and none of the one's I have found even stack up to traditionally made :(

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lorax
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WE, PM me. I'll gladly share Anita's great-great-gran's.

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aww thanks message sent!

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Diamond Pearl Food Basmati Rice

I ate the best long grain basmati rice today and I would be glad to share this with the world. Diamond Pearl Long Grain Basmat is the best rice.

I give you the instructions in order to cook this rice.



1 cup of diamond pearl basmati rice

2 cup of water

1 table spoon oil and a pinch of salt.



For best results soak rice in cold water for 2-30 minutes before cooking.



* Rinse measured rice 1 to 2 times to remove extra starch and drain.

* Place the drained rice,water, salt and oil in an open pan and bring to boil on hight flame. Stir occasionally

* As water reduces below rice leve, lower the flame, place a tight lid over the pan and let the rice cook in the steam for 18 minutes. Fluff with fork and serve.



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