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xoxo
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Do you know what kind of stone this is?

I got this rock last year at the mountains, and I don't remember what it's called.

Some of the rocks I got could be cut, and I need to know if this one can.
If I knew the name, it would be easier to know if it could.

Not the best picture. It's a greenish, blue... almost clear.

[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/bestestbuddy412/DSCF6345.jpg[/img]

Thanks a ton!

Ashley

DoubleDogFarm
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Here is a list of green gemstones.

https://www.gemologyonline.com/green.html


Eric

tedln
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If it is almost clear, it could be obsidian, but it should have some sharp edges. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsidian

It may also be agate, but agate is not usually very clear. With agate, it seems like you can see into it, but not through it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agate

The gemstone emerald is deep green and clear, but is usually found as a crystal embedded in another mineral. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emerald

Ted

Charlie MV
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It looks like a petrified Hershey Kiss.

tedln
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Charlie MV wrote:It looks like a petrified Hershey Kiss.
NNNooooooo Charlie! :shock: Petrified Hershey kisses are very, very, rare. They are worth their weight in petrified donkey doo.

Ted

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lorax
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Looks like Jadeite, but I have no sense of scale on it. It could also be Peridot or a number of other stones....

tedln
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Lorax is right. I forgot about Jadeite. I don't know which "mountains" you found the stone in, but they are common in the mountains of Colorado.

I'm not very familiar with Peridot. I think it is a gemstone and in the United States is found mostly in Arizona.

Ted

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lorax
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Location: Ecuador, USDA Zone 13, at 10,000' of altitude

Ted, Peridot is generally found as a gemstone in places with a prehistory of volcanic activity, alongside Olivine and Serpentine, which are related to it. I have no idea about the US, but down here I can pick chunks of any of the three I just mentioned out of rivers coming from Chimborazo, Rucu Pichincha, Imbabura, or any of a number of currently inactive volcanoes. I've never found it in the drainage of Tungurahua, though, which would suggest that it's present in complex with Andesite or Dacite and is only exposed after a period of erosion.

EDIT: xoxo, that could also be Nephrite, which is very common in the US and Canadian rockies. Jadeite is generally darker green and a bit cloudy, while Nephrite is a clearer, paler green.

The other super-longshot is Aquamarine or one of the beryl-class stones, but if that's the case it's lacking some of the telltale crystalline structures I'd associate with those.

Ted's absolutely right - knowing which mountains you got that from would help us ID it more closely....

tedln
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Choose the least attractive side of the stone and rub it lightly against the concrete of your patio or a brick on your house. If it leaves a white powdery residue, it is some form of a soft mineral deposit like quartz. If it doesn't leave a deposit, it may be a harder mineral type gemstone. It doesn't appear crystalline in structure.

Ted

lily51
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I'm not sure what type it is...as others have said, location of find would be helpful
As far as hardness goes, quartz is one of the harder minerals (7 on Moh's hardness scale of 10) and it doesn't powder easily, but it would powder the cement. It really doesn't look like quartz, though from the photo.
There are tests to do for mineral ID, in key form where you make selections based on simple tests. Try local library, it may have mineral books to help. :)



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