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tomf
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Physiological Effect of color Green

Taken from a web site, I feel green is the color of growing things and ties us to nature.

https://library.thinkquest.org/27066/psychology/nlcolorpsych.html

Green
Physiological Effect: Green is said to be good for you heart. On a physical and emotional, green helps your heart bring you physical equilibrium and relaxation. Green relaxes our muscles and helps us breathe deeper and slower.

Psychological Effect: Green creates feelings of comfort, laziness, relaxation, calmness. It helps us balance and soothe our emotions. Some attribute this to its connection with nature and our natural feelings of affiliation with the natural world when experiencing the color green. Yet, darker and grayer greens can have the opposite effect. These olive green colors remind us of decay and death and can actually have a detrimental effect on physical and emotional health. Note that sickened cartoon characters always turned green.

shadowsmom
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This explains why I have green walls in my bedroom, dining room, kitchen and family room. I tend to gravitate to green for my surroundings.

tedln
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Tom,

Not many replies on this one.

I will take a chance and post a tiny fragment of my belief system specific to your question.

"He maketh me to lie down in green pastures. He restoreth my soul."

Yep, the color green has a psychological effect on me.

I won't mind if the post is deleted.

Ted

cynthia_h
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All of the desert-inspired religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) find great restorative value in green surroundings. This makes all kinds of sense, because if you're in a water-deprived environment, the very presence of plants is refreshing: they provide shade, the ground beneath them has (relatively) soft groundcover as opposed to scratchy desert plants or even bare sand, and plants provide food.

No more dried rations with carefully measured out water! There's an oasis ahead!

Or, in the Levant, whose climate is similar to that of California (rainy season/dry season), the commencement of the rains promises another season of planting and hoped-for plenty.

Even before the rise of the monotheistic religions, the weather was the domain of the mightiest of gods: Zeus/Jupiter. Everything rested on his happiness or unhappiness: drought? flood? just enough rain? terrible lightning? Greece and Italy, the lands where Zeus/Jupiter originated (at least by these two names), also have climates like that of the Levant. Not for nothing is it referred to as the "Mediterranean climate." Green...the entire landscape changes, at first subtly, then seemingly all at once There It Is!

Green = plants = food is probably hard-wired into our brains from long ago, when we searched for food, before we grew it. Different shades of green and different shapes of leaf meant different kinds of food were ready for gathering. Deep satisfaction (dare I say soul-deep satisfaction?) could develop from such sustained knowledge, passed down and repeated through generation after generation after generation until...

We no longer live or die from the ability or inability to apply this knowledge, but the soul-stirring satisfaction remains.

Thus my thoughts.

Cynthia H.

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applestar
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But isn't the color green considered UNLUCKY by some cultures? I seem to remember reading that somewhere....

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Please let me know when you remember, because I don't know of one. OTOH, I'm not a cultural anthropologist, nor have I done extensive reading in that field, so it's entirely possible that there are many and I just don't know of them.

Green is revered to the extent of being "the color of the Prophet" in Islam; I don't think it has any special status in either Judaism or Christianity except in the liturgical calendar, which dictates specific vestment colors.

White is a bad-luck/death color in Chinese culture, or at least it was in traditional Chinese culture.

Even the English language preserves some feeling of white as negative vs. black as positive and a color of fecund life: "the dead, white sand" or "bleeding someone white as a turnip" (I.e., no more blood so that the skin turned as pale as possible) or even "whitewashing" one's deeds to cover up evil. OTOH, "the black, living earth" and "the skies, black with birds" convey the image of vast amounts of life and living beings.

The pre-industrial Steppe was often referred to as the Ocean of Grass or the Sea of Grass. A vast expanse of green, waving in the wind.

Cynthia

tedln
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There are always the negative connotations such as "green with envy", "give me the green" symbolizing money and greed, and others.

Ted

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gixxerific
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Here is your answer Apple from [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green]Wikipedia[/url]
Death, decay, and evil

Green is also known to have signified witchcraft, devilry and evil for its association with faeries and spirits of early English folklore. It also had an association with decay and toxicity.[35] Actor Bela Lugosi wore green-hued makeup for the role of Dracula in the 1927–28 Broadway stage production.[36] A green tinge in the skin is sometimes associated with nausea and sickness.[37] A physically ill person is said to look green around the gills.[2] The color, when combined with gold, is seen as representing the fading of youth.[38] In the Celtic tradition, green was avoided in clothing for its superstitious association with misfortune and death.[39][40] Green is thought to be an unlucky color in British and British-derived cultures,[41] where green cars, wedding dresses, and theater costumes are all the objects of superstition.[42] Spider-Man villains were often colored green to represent a contrast to the hero's red.[43] In some Far East cultures the color green is often used as a symbol of sickness and/or nausea;[44]
But don't worry the majority of the article say's that green is good. :D [/url]

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Darwin’s theory suggested that organisms evolved to fit their environment based on natural selection. If a mutation was good, the organism lived and contributed the mutation to the gene pool of its offspring. If the mutation was bad, the organism was more likely to die before contributing to the gene pool. Over billions of years, these mutations slowly produced the world we know today.

Eric

gumbo2176
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applestar wrote:But isn't the color green considered UNLUCKY by some cultures? I seem to remember reading that somewhere....
In the biker/motorcycle rider culture of which I am comfortable, the color green is considered bad luck. One of the more credible reasons is if you are riding solo and you happen to have an accident to puts you off the road in a ditch, pasture, trees next to a cliff etc. the color green is harder to spot by passersby or if someone does come looking for you.

The bike I now own is black and chrome but my last one was a two tone green one. I have no room in my life for superstitions. I'd still have it if it didn't get destroyed in the flood of Hurricane Katrina when 4 1/2' of water swallowed it.

cynthia_h
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tedln wrote:There are always the negative connotations such as "green with envy", "give me the green" symbolizing money and greed, and others.

Ted
"Give me the green" only works in the United States--and I'm not sure how much longer it will work here. Since the Civil War, U.S. paper money has been green regardless of its denomination. Paper money in other countries varies in color, depending on its denomination, which is very helpful to people with impaired vision.

But with recent changes to our printed bills, it's hard to say--at least with a straight face--that U.S. paper money is still "green." The $5 bill has at least one large purple 5 on it, and other bills have changed in the last couple of years, too. The Treasury Dept. says it hasn't finished changing the printing specs yet, so who knows? Maybe we'll end up with different colors for each denomination, like Canada, Britain, and other countries. :?:

As for the green-eyed monster, jealousy, it may have been William Shakespeare who first coined this phrase, using it first in "The Merchant of Venice" (1596) and then in "Othello" (1604):

Portia:
How all the other passions fleet to air,
As doubtful thoughts, and rash-embraced despair,
And shuddering fear, and green-eyed jealousy! O love,
Be moderate; allay thy ecstasy,
In measure rein thy joy; scant this excess.
I feel too much thy blessing: make it less,
For fear I surfeit.

And in Othello, as Iago plants baseless thoughts of jealousy in Othello's mind:

Iago:
O, beware, my lord, of jealousy;
It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock
The meat it feeds on; that cuckold lives in bliss
Who, certain of his fate, loves not his wronger;
But, O, what damned minutes tells he o'er
Who dotes, yet doubts, suspects, yet strongly loves!

https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/166600.html

At least one (online, therefore not peer-reviewed) exponent of this theory seems to think that Shakespeare based the description of a "monster which doth mock the meat it feeds on" on cats, who seem to play with mice before killing them to eat. Since many cats have green eyes, Shakespeare may have used the cat metaphor, giving us this memorable phrase.

Give me green plants, shade, fruitful harvests, and the like any day. Ahhhh... :)

Cynthia

tedln
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Cynthia,

I really appreciate your intellectual approach to some of the subjects discussed on this forum. I don't believe you and I would ever reach much philosophical agreement, but I totally appreciate and enjoy the fact that you don't enter the discussions unarmed.

Stella sliced and diced me in another thread in a good way and I loved it.

Keep it up.

Ted :D

cynthia_h
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Aw, shucks. :oops: Thank you very much.

Cynthia



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