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Ozark Lady
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Non-food uses for milk?

Well, the family has grown again. On May 4th a young buck kid was born, and his mama is giving a gallon per day.
Today, another Nanny kidded and we have twin nannies, I also purchased a newborn (yesterday) buck kid.
So, there is 4 little mouths to feed!

Problem is: on birthing day, the mama's are treated with one medicine that gets rid of worms, and external parasites.
In about a week, all goat vaccinations will also be done. So the milk will clear from all the above at about the same time.

So until abou the middle of June, the only use for goat milk that I have is feeding the babies. My freezer is getting so full of milk!
I save some in case there is not enough or problems in the future.
But, enough is enough. I will be getting about 2 gallons per day, and the 4 babies will likely not eat a full gallon for awhile. They will get up to eating more, when they grow some!

I milk twice per day, and I am already saving the water from rinsing out the milking bucket, all bottles, and jugs and saving the water as a fundicide.

But, I can't keep freezing milk, I could feed it to chickens, I guess, or to the dogs, but is there any other uses for milk, that can't be ingested due to pesticides used on the mama goats? Would it be safe in goat milk soap? I used Ivermectin. I hate using pesticides, but I don't know of any alternatives for internal and external parasites, and can't let the animals suffer.

And so, I now have oh my, 9 little manure machines! 2 boys, and 2 girls, and only one goat left to go, and all kids will be born! I will be vaccinating them for clostridium and Lepto. And the follow up will be another clostridium and tetanus vaccination.

These are annual vaccinations, and not something done without alot of forethought and vet recommendations.

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applestar
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I would've said soap, too. How do you feel about using the milk for the 10% Milk Solution? Keep them frozen until needed throughout the season. My garden is starting to need regular applications already, probably thanks to that heatwave that woke everything up followed by the cold wet days. Roses, Tomatoes, one of the Pears so rest of the fruit trees are getting sprayed too.

As for non-chemical vermicide -- have you looked into feeding DE or Bentonite Clay? The Clay proponents say clay is live and DE is dead so clay is better.

I wish we lived closer. You'd let me bring my kids for a visit wouldn't you? :wink:

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Ozark Lady
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Give the goat kids a week to grow a bit, and look out, human kids will have a blast with them.
Right now, they are cuddly and learning to balance well, while bouncing along.
One is light tan, one is dark brown, one is black and white, and one is snow white... alot of variety!
I haven't gotten any photos as of yet.

sciencegal
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Hi OL, I raise nubian dairy goats and have for about 15 years. Extra milk is always a problem if you can call it that. Try making cheese. Chevre is easy and you can freeze it. Chickens love milk. Right now I'm giving my small flock about a gallon every other day. That will end when I get another bottle calf in a few weeks.

I don't have to worm goats, living at high altitudes with little grazing, but you don't have to worry too much about ivermectin getting into the milk. It won't hurt the chickens.

What kind if goats do you have?

Green Mantis
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Oh I miss my goats. I had 2 as pets when I was about 10 yrs old. The dog, 2 goats and I wandered all over farmers fields. Where we were allowed. So much fun. Then raised them when Our kids were small. We used the milk regularly, and if anyone ever said Yuck I wouldn't drink goats milk ( while they were drinking their coffee) Guess what the Milk was. LOL!!! No one ever knew unless we told them. They are so much fun, such personality. Our children enjoyed playing with them so much, we never had to worry as they never ever hurt them. Maybe when our miniature horse ever passes away ( hopefully not for a long time) I will try and talk hubby into letting me have a milk goat again. :)

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Ozark Lady
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I have La Mancha goats. I do plan to also get a nubian doe, I miss ears!

That post seems so long ago! The babies are 8 weeks old, beginning to eat grain and grass, but still dependent on their milk.

The main reason that I have goats is that I love to make homemade cheese, and sometimes I even get really energetic and make some butter.
Butter is an issue, because goat milk doesn't freely separate out like cow's milk does. It wants to stay homogenized.

We are beginning to have some milk for the house. When guests are served a glass of ice cold goat milk, they want more, more, more!
But, I am still feeding, future milkers so nope, a sample is all I offer! ha ha

It is really helpful, to save the water from rinsing out milking containers, pitchers, and glasses, and then use that on the plants... plants love milk too! And milk knocks out fungus in a hurry!

I got my very first milk goat... in 1986! So, I have milked for several years. Occasionally, I don't breed the goats, so that I get a year off of milking.

Green Mantis
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Have you ever tried not breeding, and milking through the year? Some people can seem to manage that and don't get swamped with milk EVER year.? Just a thought. :idea:

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Ozark Lady
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That is my goal for 2010, to just milk through.

In earlier years I had a buck with the herd. So they bred at will.

Then I just borrowed a buck last time, and haven't kept my own.
But, the does dried up before the kids were even weaned so the babies had to go on formula. I am not sure what happened with that, my son had them, since I was at work all the time. And they kidded just weeks after my house burned (2008) so I was not in a position to take care of them. I chose not to breed them at all for 2009 kids.

This year, I figure, I will just raise the new buck (not related), and not keep him with the girls at all. Then I will decide about breeding, only once the lactation stops or slows badly.

I am planning on leash training the buck and teach him to pull a small cart or even a garden plow. So, I am raising him as a very big pet.

The does I think I might consider training them to pack.
My idea is: They can help me to grow their food, and help deliver it to the barn to be stored for them later. Also, it is spending more time with some very friendly animals.
And with more training, I could actually take them into the main garden and let them weed the edges and help with keeping the power line cleared, without getting loose and out on the highway.

Only problem is: They are strong! And with 4 feet, they can be more sure footed than I am, and training could be difficult, on full sized goats, so I think I need to start with a baby goat.

I actually like goats more than dogs or cats. I spend alot more time in grooming them, and just petting and enjoying them than I do with the dogs, except for my chihuahua.

sciencegal
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I've been milking through the year -- only breeding a doe every other year, if she holds out well -- ever since I started out with goats 15 or so years ago. This way I don't have so many kids to deal with and I have milk all winter. Because of this practice in selecting only those does who hold up through winter I have a good line of long term milkers. Sometimes in the middle of December when they are only giving about 2 cups of milk a day (in one milking a day) I kind question the whole idea but then in spring they come right back up again.

Even still, some does do not hold up and completely dry off around November. These I sell to people who want a milk goat but do not want to milk year-round.

Green Mantis
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Well at least you can give bucks a bath anyway! LOL!!! Train HIM to pack, they are so strong, you might as well. With the does either get a collar on them that you can pull right up under their throat with the lead to make them smarten up. Don't give them much lead at all. Actually choke chains work with them too. You don't have to be rough, it just gives you more control. They can and are strong, but it's a good way to start working with them. Hope you have a special set of cover-alls to use when you work with him. They smell so SWEET :wink: Or if that doesn't work, you can get goat Halters, then they really don't have the leverage to pull you around. Just some thoughts anyway. I understand, why you want to spend so much time with them, they have such super temperments.----Oh I do miss them!!! Good Luck. Sounds like you have some good ideas going anyway. :)

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Ozark Lady
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Some bucks smell worse than others.

Seems to me that Toggenburgs smell the worst of all, maybe due to the hair?

They actually don't smell all that terrible outside of mating season, just a bit musty.

Hey, a neighbor gave me sick baby pig. She had a navel cord infection, and with some penicillin, and alot of care she grew up. She lived in the house and wore diapers, until she learned to walk. Then she had a doghouse right in the yard, she was the 'watchpig' and would really intimidate people. Finally, at about 250 pounds she got moved to the pasture! And even pot bellied pigs stink, but folks still love them.

We have had boxers and pit bulls and they both had 'gas' issues and could clear a room very quickly!

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microcollie
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I volunteer at a couple local animal shelters, and they often feed orphaned animals goat or sheep milk. Perhaps you could call a few and see if they would like a donation. I would think that the Ivermectin might even be a good thing for most stray pups.

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microcollie
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Forgot to mention...Be sure to alert them to the Ivermectin. It's toxic to a small number of dog breeds.

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Ozark Lady
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Fresh raw goat milk is a very good health food. You should google raw milk and see all the health benefits. Also milk is divided into types: With type A1 being not good for man nor beast, and type A2 being healthy, it is back in their DNA that the change happens.
Nations with A1 milk have higher incidences of certain diseases.
Type A2 is: human breast milk, and goat milk, and probably other milks.
A few cows give A2, but holsteins, the major milker of dairy farms gives A1.
Learn about your milk, and you will want a dairy goat, a guernsey cow, or to find a place to buy raw milk from someone who has A2 milk.

I have saved: newborn colts with dead mares (no colostrum even), newborn deer (almost dead of starvation), and dogs that were abandoned and starved down to skin and bones with goat milk.

https://www.gardenharvest.org/milkbenefits.htm

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/04/27/does-drinking-milk-cause-upperrespiratory-congestion.aspx

Green Mantis
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OZARK LADY------ Had to laugh when you said toggenburgs stunk the worst, That's exactly what we had, as a breed of goat. The milk we got was only ever bad in one doe, it didn't taste good. She never had mastitis, but just off flavoured milk. Everybody told us, that toggs milk tasted awful, but it was only that one doe, that had an off taste. Strange. I always wanted a couple of Nubians too. They are so beautiful, with those ears and all the lovely colours they come in. I always like the black and white spotted ones. :D I do miss them! :(

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Ozark Lady
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I wouldn't be without a goat!
Even little pygmies or nigerian dwarfs give milk. Just difficult to get hold of anything to milk.

Ivermectin is dangerous for all collie type dogs, for sure, I haven't heard of other breeds that have issues with it. But the quantity excreted in milk would likely be so little as to be no problem. Ivermectin is used in humans, and it is often used in dogs, and other animals.

The main issue for me in the milk was... sulmet, a coccidiostat. Coccidiosis is a devastating illness of animals... even tropical fish get it. It is breed specific, so I can't catch goat coccidiosis. But, I have a major allergy to sulphur, as we found out, when we rented a house that had sulphur water.. yuck, and it threw me into major allergy attacks, just by the smell.

My book, Herbal handbook for farm and stable is now in. So, I will be using herbs alot. As soon as, I get a microscope and can do my own fecals, bye bye chemicals, unless herbs are not getting the parasite.

But for 30 days I get the milk again, it is only once a month that they need to be dosed for parasites, and then only for about 3 days that I don't keep the milk.

Green Mantis
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Been awhile since I have been on, but you know, I am sorely tempted to try sneaking a goat in here! Maybe a pygmy x milk type doe would work better than a larger sized goat for us? But I want to make sure it's cae free too, so possibly need to find a good breeder of goats around here. I love nubians, but theyr'e too noisy ( darn!) saanens are kind of boring, we liked the toggs when we had them, but their milk can be off flavoured, so not sure what breed to try, the pygmy's are so small that a lot need c-sections when they give birth. Decisions, decisions?????? Any ideas???

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Ozark Lady
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I found a very fun way to spend a cold snowy day.

I found an online virtual show, it is miniature goats!

You can see the current winners and even go back a few years.

These are the beautiful goals that most of us are still striving for, not the run-of-the-mill dairy mini goat.

I do not have mini-goats, but it sure is tempting. The average weight of them is about 100-150 pounds, compared to my girls 250-300 pounds still better than a cow at thousands of pounds.

But what I want you to see is that they are all breeds, not just one!
Nothing is sold on this site, it is just showing off some cute goats...

Oh and the teats are bared... oops...

I also found some articles where the goat justice league is trying to get cities to allow miniature milk goats for sustainability, but that was on another forum.

Here is the goat show:
https://www.miniaturedairygoats.com/V-Show/Past%20V-Shows.htm

This blog is basically one person's fight and victory in legallizing goats for urban area. It is food for thought for some of you.
I didn't see anything sold on the site, if it is I missed it, just info is all I saw.
https://www.goatjusticeleague.org/Site/Legalizing_Goats.html
She makes a great point, if folks can have huge dogs, and often dangerous dogs, why can't a person have a small milk goat?

Lehcar
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Take.

A.

Milk.

Bath.

You'll feel like heaven afterward. I could gush about the feeling for paragraph after paragraph but I won't except to say that you'll start to take one weekly (I did it daily for a while but it got expensive and then I began to smell like slightly spoiled milk... hmm... was it worth it? Maybe!).

Just add a gallon or two to your bathwater (this would be good to use up that milk that is soon to go bad) and enjoy!

You could take a few cups of oatmeal, tie it together in a cheesecloth or other porous cloth and hang it just under the running bathwater to infuse the water. Try this with any dried flower petals or herbs. I'd suggest keep it to a single cup of dried herbs, however.

A friend of mine kept trying to foist off cuttings from her Frankenstein rosemary bush (this thing was like... 8 feet tall and as wide as her car!) so finally I just went to her house and stripped that thing down as far as I had energy to and got 4 gallon-sized bags out of it. So now I'm staring at all this rosemary I have NO clue what to do with and no heart to toss so I dried it and began using it cosmetically. My husband calls this the "year of the rosemary Rachel" haha. So anyway, I began taking weekly milk and rosemary baths. I wish I could afford the extra expense again because my skin was b-e-a-utiful and soft as a baby's.

Milk is also great to sooth sunburns. While I live close to the beach I don't get there often (to my dismay!) so when I do go to the beach it turns into an all-day affair. We get there early, leave late and wake up in pain from the sunburn because no matter how many times I set my watch to reapply sunblock I always seem to walk away like a lobster.

Soak cheesecloth in milk and apply to sunburned areas. Re-wet often. One year it was so bad, I just set up shop on the living room floor with a blow-up mattress and my husband used a 4-inch paintbrush to apply milk directly to the cheesecloth across my back and shoulders, haha! Oh... memories!

Here's a couple of recipes--make big batches and foist it off on friends and family... after all, what else are they for?! Hehehe!

Milk and Oatmeal Cleanser
1 c. milk
1/2 c. oatmeal
1 heaping tbsp. honey

Blend ingredients until smooth in a blender. Store in a clean jar with a lid. Keep refrigerated up to 3 weeks. To use: wet face with warm water, massage cleanser into face and neck, rinse then pat dry.

Mild Cleanser for Sensitive Skin
1 c. water
1/2 c. milk
1/4 c. baking soda
2 egg whites (save the yolks for a great hair treatment)

Stir ingredients together. Store in a clean jar with a lid. Keep refrigerated up to 3 weeks. To use: shake ingredients (as they may separate) and apply to a cloth (as it may be too water to apply by hand). Massage into face and neck, rinse then pat dry.

Leftover Coffee Face and Body Scrub

This can be a one- or two-part beauty treatment depending on how industrious you're feeling. The one-part consists of simply taking the coffee or tea grounds leftover from breakfast and adding just enough milk to make a smooth paste and then scrub away at your body being gentle with your face and neck area. Rinse with extra milk if you'd like or just water. The two-part consists of soaking your leftover coffee or tea grounds (usually about a cup if you're a serious coffee drinker) with 4 cups of milk over the course of the entire day (or around 8-12 hours). Strain the coffee grounds, reserving the liquid. Don't squeeze all the milk out. Now scrub away as before but this time rinse face, body and hair with the coffee-infused milk.

Milk works on your skin in several ways, it has an acid in it that acts as a gentle exfoliant, it also has fats and proteins that help soften your skin. Not only does coffee act as an abrasive exfoliant but the oils help soften your skin and even offer a tiny bit of sun-blocking power.

Gentle Body Scrub

1/2 c. sugar
3 tbsp. oil of choice (olive, vegetable, coconut...)
3 tbsp. milk

This is a single-use recipe so increase ingredients accordingly if making a large batch to give away or to keep in your refrigerator (up to 3 weeks).

Happy milking!

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Ozark Lady
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Cool ideas, and recipes. Thanks!

I am planning to learn to make soap, and goat milk soap is very popular, this gives me ideas of oatmeal and rosemary added to it.

I have used water kefir to prevent infection in a large open wound, where the flesh actually curled under itself. Just soaking it once a day, and it healed on its own, and shows not even a scar. I can imagine what milk kefir would have done for injuries. Knowing that, I think that even spoiled milk especially raw, could have many healing attributes.

As antibiotics become less successful, we will really need to know how to use some of these natural processes.

I got a "windburn" or sort of sunburn once, it was terrible. I really feel sorry for folks that have this issue. It is dangerous, and I think the best preventative is: get a tan, and keep it year round. It will lighten somewhat in winter, but still, if you (on purpose) sit in front of a sunny window for a while each day, it will help you at least have a "farmer's tan" and that will help. Just as you keep soil covered to keep it fertile, keep a bit of tan going. Take your lunch outside every opportunity that you have!

Green Mantis
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:D Thanks so much for the link, that was really interesting. Definitely 2 finger milking though, lol. They didn't look that small until one picture, then it really brought the size to light. Boy a lot has happened in the goat world since we used to raise them. These are top quality goats in miniature! Very nice. Thanks again Ozark Lady!!! :wink:



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