wingdesigner
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Solveig wrote:I’m familiar with "House", it’s one of my favourite series. And yes, you are right; Koo isn’t much of a name.
Reminds me of that line from one of the Pirates of the Caribbean movies: "We pirates aren't very imaginative when it comes to naming things." Not that I'm implying the namers of birds are pirates...(ahem), just not as creative as we'd hoped. (Oh boy, am I gonna get in trouble for that remark!) Moving on...
I believe Koo has become the most famous Finnish osprey ever and the hunter who found him has got e-mails from all over the world thanking him for rescuing the bird.
Poor guy, just what he wanted--"instant fame".
They are trying to make the connection to the Seili nest better equipped against lightning for the future, but in case Aarni and Eliel haven´t migrated to Africa already, they probably have before the nestcam is fixed again. But for those moments you don’t find anything more productive to do, you can always watch this beautiful video showing happenings in the Seili nest January to August 2009:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O3LdUbENBOc

I hope the dentist didn’t torture you too much. It always feels good when it’s done, anyway.
Not too bad, only a couple of days of soreness. I think they sandblast my gums. I've been struggling with one cold-sensitive tooth for the better part of the year. We tried some sort of "caulk" this time to see how that goes. I'm also using a special toothpaste for sensitive teeth. Seems like a waste as it's more expensive than the regular stuff, and I only need it for one tooth. Haven't figured out how to brush just one tooth, yet. I'm grateful I still have most of mine, though. :lol: Contrary to popular opinion, I have a small mouth and had to have several teeth removed to make room for the rest.

The cats are tolerating "rehearsal" well, with copious amounts of treats, but a half-hour joy ride is a far cry from over three hours cooped up, and a strange venue for the next few days. We'll see.

Still picking cherry tomatoes by the handsful, the bigger ones have stuttered, thanks to our cool nights. The leaf lettuce has bolted and I don't know if I'll get around to planting a fall crop. The sweet peppers are still going, but something starts eating them before they colour up, so all I'm picking are green ones. The mosquitoes are fierce, even with some of the 40F nights we've had. I've also discovered yet another entrance to the woodchuck burrow in my yard. One of these days I'll probably get a nasty surprise when I reach in a bunch of vines to pick something. :o That's all for now. Thanks for the link.

Are you wrapping up your garden yet?
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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So, I found some other peaceful, time-wasting webcams in Lahaina, Hawaii; and Juneau, Alaska. Ahhh. No wildlife, except for the two-legged variety. But lots of nice, rolling, ocean waves.
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Wing

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Fun link, but I am spoiled. Just visited my local osprey nests again (vacated for the season) but we were really back to see what I have come to think of as MY eagles (I have visited these three fledges every week since they started moving out of the nest, and have a vested interest in their well-being now). They were no where near the nest but showed up as we got to the headwater, all three circling about as if to say "Looking for someone?" And what had been a lacklustre wildlife cruise suddenly sparked up. As we turned back downstream, a black duck exploded from the reeds with a near miss from a peregrine, who then made do with dragonflies; we watched as his mate joined in the to and fro of dragonfly hunting. Suddenly a marsh hawk joins in the eagles circling, like some wannabe eagle. He was mostly ignored. We passed the swan family on their way to the wildrice beds on the headwater oxbows; I give them much respect as there are few animals out here that can hurt me, but I have seen a swan hit a boat with a wing and dent it and it gives you a very healthy respect) Dad was suitably on guard, but not belligerent. Then I saw another raptor circling south; what I hoped was the triplets mom, turned out to be a red tail hawk. As we turned up the little side creek I saw a belted kingfisher and mate, chiding us from the banks, always looping just ahead to take up another position before finally leaving us in the creek as they flew back out to the river. Suddenly from the tight stream banks a great blue heron blasts off with a raucous croak; while he was startled I very nearly contributed to the bilgewater already in my kayak. The wildflowers were just lovely and I was pleased to see some not so common white turtleheads ([url=https://www.plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CHGL2]Chelone glabra[/url]) among the other wetland flowers. As we reemerged fromn the creek my companion spots a raptor flying across the cove; as I get the glasses on it the white tail and head make it immediately clear that Mom has come to visit the kids. She flares into a snag, and then settles in for a good preening; we watched her the better part of an hour before she finally lifted of in a graceful arc (her ungrateful brats had done no better than circle at a distance as Mom had come empty handed. I suspect the free ride is over, and the kids had better get skills quickly). Unlike the osprey, this family is likely going to be here the year round, so I am looking forward to keeping tabs for as long as weather allows, and even contemplating a wetsuit to make the season longer. I love the links, but show me a website that puts on a show like Mother Nature did for me the other day. I love my kayak!
Scott Reil

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HG. you braggart. :P Is there a webcam out there that hasn't gotten struck by lightning, or knocked askew by something landing on it?
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Wing

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No bragging Wing, just pointing out that while the Web is fun, there is no substitute for going out and doing. Familiarity breeds contempt, but even the smallest patch of Nature offers myriad experience to anyone who would go observe, even in the most unlikely of places... also I was just a mile above where the raptor studies that Rachel Carson alludes to in Silent Spring took place, so it's also an osprey success story (much as they weren't there last week, I did watch the family of four (Ma, Pa, and two young uns) oprey fledge and grow (and even interact peaceably with the eagles). Up close and personal just can't be recreated by the Web...

DW and I went to James Goodwin State Conservation area two weeks back. She said "Why there?" to which I replied "Because we haven't yet, and it will be a different type of paddle that we haven't done yet." "What does that mean?" I explained that the going would be slow because of the lack of open water, myriad stumps, floating islands, etc. She reads the description in our paddle book and balks hard. "No way." I convince her to go look, with a back up plan not far away. We get there and even I was daunted by the view; 75 acres of stumps and snags, broken by lily pads and tussock sedge. DW is shooting looks like I have really screwed up this time, but finally agrees to paddle. We are not ten minutes in when the mood changes perceptibly. This is no dismal swamp, it is brimming with frogs, turtles, fish and waterfowl. Soon DW is leading the charge enthusiastically, winding through tussocks, pathfinding around floating islands, stumps and snags, and spotting ducks and geese left and right. We saw an old squaw, a duck I have never encountered in my life except this instance, and DW commments as we close on the ramp at the end of the paddle that she has had her eyes opened. Take Nature beyond your set of values and assessments, let her show you what she is willing to offer, but most importantly, just go and do. You wil NEVER be dissappointed by Mother's work if you are open to it.

HG
Scott Reil

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RIP, Crookshank!

My favourite underdog, well, underbird, actually, had to be euthanized earlier this month. He was "no. 3" in the Hailuoto nest (aerie?) and had been found in a ditch at the end of August. The website posted pictures of him at the Rauna Zoo and it was apparent he'd suffered additional injuries, possibly spinal, from the photos. It is apparent from the keepers' faces when it was determined that euthanasia was the best course of action for the bird. However, I am grateful that the site posted the pictures and update for us to follow his progress. If (Solveig or) someone can pass along my regards to the originators of the site or the appropriate agency, and my thanks as well, I would appreciate it.

So, HG, you narrowly missed a marital spat on that one, eh? Thanks to Nature.
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Wing

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Sorry to hear about the Finnish bird, Wing. I have a soft spot for raptors and wish them all well and feel the loss of every one. Thanks to Ms. Carson we have a homegrown lot around here I can scope out, so I have become jaded ("Ho hum, another osprey.") but I remember Mom jamming on the brakes in the mid-70's to show us kids one because she wasn't sure we would get a chance to see another. Now familiarity breeds indifference and I was suprised by the folks that paddled by while I was eagle viewing, pausing just a moment and letting me know they see eagles all the time now. This is the greatest danger these birds face; apathy on our part. I try and remember that every bird I see.

Right now my holy grail is [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Kestrel]kestrels (sparrow hawks)[/url]; it has been years since I have seen one, and while peregrines seem to have made a comeback, the smallest falcon is conspicuously absent. Prettiest of the bunch too...

As to the marital discord narrowly avoided, it was DW's realization that Nature offers goodies EVERYWHERE that saved the day; knew I married her for something. Even a puddle is a teeming jungle, let alone the ecotonal wonder that is late stage eutrophication. It's a lot more than just a swamp... appreciate the Nature in your region, your town, even your backyard, because it is all big N Nature... :mrgreen:

HG
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I have not paid lots of attention, but within the past two years have seen a sparrow hawk numerous times on my little three mile walk/job route. I assume the birds are still fairly common here in central South Carolina. Will pay more attention in the future.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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Good to hear Alex; I have long suspected it is habitat loss here that is the issue (while Connecticut remains one of the few places on the planet that is in afforestation, these are really creatures of the open country and farmland, both mostly endangered ecotypes here in CT).

HG
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We live in a very rural area. But I may have only seen the night hawk as the small hawklike bird that I've noted is generally active in the evening. I'll be more aware whenever I see a small hawk or falcon like bird and perhaps get an i.d. We have lots of mixed forest and lots of pasture land in our area so would not be surprised to see both species here.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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Yeah, we have lots of stuff teeming in puddles around here--mosquito larvae! It's a shame that everything leaves or hibernates before the last batches hatch, making fall and Indian Summers miserable. Now the yellowjackets and other assorted hornets are trying to store up for winter so they're everywhere, too. Seems like we got rid of the chipmunks in the walls only to have everything else try and move in. :evil:
I'm a peregrine fan, ever since that research paper back in jr. high (no comments about how long ago THAT was). Saw one in AK at the Raptor Center--lil' goldbricker. He'd flunked flight school three times, even though he was perfectly capable of hunting flight. So now he gets his three squares handed to him for the rest of his life. No dummy, there. The staff said it was like he knew when it was the "final exam" and would start acting up. So now he just flies merrily around his enclosure and vogues for the tourists.
Anyway, our peregrine cam around here shuts down fairly early, so I'll settle for the osprey cams in Finland/Norway, and the great background scenery! Thank goodness they have an English translation!
I haven't successfully found any raptor webcams in either their winter locations or in Aus/NZ--anybody else have some they'd share?
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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Thank you, HG, for the nice wildlife story. I fully agree that Mother Nature puts on the best show. However, the webcams are also nice, and I hope they will get a live video connection also to the nest in Seili next year, there are plans for one anyway. But of course there will still be risk of lightning.

I will pass along your regards, wing, if I get the chance. I also felt sad for Crookshanks, but I’m sure the vet based the decision on what was best for the bird. The vet told that Crookshanks´s both legs were very brittle, not only the deformed one. This brittle bones condition might be a birth defect or due to little exercise or both. We will probably never know exactly the reason to the leg deformity. It might even be due to the fact that the Baltic Sea becomes more and more polluted. As the ospreys eat only fish, it is a danger for them, if the food starts to contain too much unhealthy stuff. But to cheer you up a little, I can tell that Bubi the eagle-owl is doing fine and has been seen at different places in Helsinki, however, not at the Olympic stadium where he used to be earlier. He was at the stadium in spring, but left when they started to make arrangements for a music concert. Bubi seems to like football more than music, at least he didn’t like AC/DC.

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:lol: :lol: Yeah, I agree with him on the music choices. Although, judging by what I've seen on tv during those football matches, I don't know which is louder... It was probably the feedback screeches from the mic tests that drove him away. Glad to hear he's doing well and getting out more... :wink:
Thank you for your kind offer to pass along my wishes and condolences. No, Crookshanks didn't look too good in those zoo pictures, one could see he was suffering.

I noticed from the slideshows both sites presented that apparently the ospreys are the last to arrive in Spring; therefore they have to evict whatever has claimed the nest before they get there; is that a correct assumption? Being the smaller bird, they must really get into some "dust-ups" with the eagles. I'm impressed. I know how it feels to arrive late and miss all the prime spots for parking or viewing. Not quite the same, but...
(shrugs shoulders)
Our martins and swallows have all headed south, and we now have a bumper crop of mosquitoes, along with yellowjackets (hornets) to pester any decent outdoor time. Ugh. Well that's all for now. Thanks again.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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Bubi shows remarkably good taste for a fish eagle. I wonder what concert might bring him back? I suspect he's a classical fan, although jazz cannot be entirely ruled out...

Crookshanks was an apex predator and as one, subject to the continued concentration of toxins in the food chain. Each bacteria gets a little dose, the amobae that eats them gets all theirs, as the cilliate chows amobae he gets all theirs, then the krill eats a bunch of ciliates, the fish eats a bunch of krill and by the time it got to Crookshank, it was the concentrated doses of billions of bacteria into his diet. As the highest apical feeder on the planet you'd think we'd wise up faster to this phenomenon.

Coincidentally, the studies that Rachel Carson notes in Silent Spring about just this accumulation of DDT being the causal agent for loss of osprey and eagles took place just a mile south of my eagles and ospreys nests, so actually doing something about this has profound and tangible benefit; my birds are likely the decendants of the few survivors of "better living through chemicals". I hope that we do not need to relearn this lesson again and again like recalcitrant schoolkids; we will lose too many species along the way. We are no more or less important than any other species in Nature's eyes, but we tend to think only in human interest. May we soon see the error of our ways and change for good (in more ways than one).

HG
Scott Reil



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