Regular Al
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Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Hello there everybody,

I have about 4 -5 of these and lost the oh so important id tag ...

They are planted under large trees .
The pic is of one that gets 4-5 hours of afternoon sun only. The others get filtered sun through the day.
My questions:
This is their 3rd year since planting and they never get bigger .
SHOuld I move them to a sunnier place . My only option is the back yard which gets 5-6 hours of morning sun.
I was thinking of grouping them together for bigger impact.
When should I move them ? IN spring .
They have dead, leaf-less stems each year before new growth. Do I cut those stems off ?

NC Clay soil.

Thanks,
Al
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rainbowgardener
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Umm.... did you get the wrong picture?

The one you posted is clearly not a hydrangea. It is a pine tree and it is in a pot, not under a tree. So I'm thinking you just attached the wrong picture.

Try again?
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

Regular Al
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

ooops .
let's try that again.
I do know a dwarf alberta when I see one . :D
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luis_pr
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

The best way to identify it is by the blooms.

Here is a picture of Hydrangea macrophylla 'Mariesii Variegated' in bloom (the center of the bloom is pinkish in alkaline soil and blueish in acidic soil):

https://sp.yimg.com/ib/th?id=JN.vj0I3Ju ... d=15.1&P=0

Below is a picture of an European Variegated Dogwood bloom:

https://www.johansengreenhouse.com/asset ... wigged.jpg

Regular Al
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Location: Raleigh, N.C.

Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Hey Luis,
I think it is the first link but can't be sure because none of them have ever bloomed which makes me think I've planted them in the wrong spot. They do come back every year but this is the 3rd year and they don't bloom nor get bigger.

Thanks,
Al
Raleigh, N.C.

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skiingjeff
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Definitely cut off the dead branches of any plant. They don't provide any use is they are dead. We've moved hydrangea and all types of plants throughout the season with success.

I believe the best time is in the Spring which gives the plant the longest season to get re-established. The important thing is to keep a transplant well watered during the season of transplant to help reduce the stress caused by transplanting.

Good luck with your plant!

Regular Al
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Ok thanks.

Will replant next spring.
Al
Raleigh, N.C.

luis_pr
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Hydrangeas that return from the crown "on a regular basis" every year but do not bloom usually have a problem with winter and require winter protection. Hydrangeas whose stems do not die off and who do not bloom may have a problem anytime from the point that flower buds are created until the time that the blooms are about to open. The flower can get killed by early frosts if the plant does not go dormant due to high nitrogen levels in the soil. The flower buds can also get killed later on if it gets too cold. And the flower buds can be eaten in the Spring by deer/rabbits/squirrels.

This hydrangea develops flower buds starting in July 2015 down in the South and August 2015 in the North. The buds will remain invisible until they open in the Spring 2016.

Usually Mariessi Variegated starts to have problem in the northern regions (Zones 5 and 6). This not only kills the Fall flower buds but, sometimes, it can kill the stems too, which start to regrow from the crown in Spring but then do not produce bloomage until the following year.

I actually like Mariessi Variegated for its leaves only. It does not produce as many blooms as other lacecaps and the blooms are not as striking as the variegated leaves (at least, not to me). Maybe there is something weird going on when hydrangeas have unusual foliage because I also had the same feelings towards Sun Goddess, a lacecap hydrangea that has yellow leaves and had pink blooms in my alkaline soil.

By the way, what zone/state/city are you in?

In the meantime, you can take these steps... Fertilize in Spring. Your last fertilization of any type should be no later than the end of June yearly in order to make sure that the plant goes dormant at the proper time. But fertilize again in July-August-September if you are in Florida or South Texas). Keep the soil as evenly moist as you can. That is important to do from July thru Winter and Spring if you are having bloomage issues. If the plant starts to dry out a lot, the flower buds will be the first thing to get zapped by the shrub. Mulch 3-4" to protect the roots and to maintain the soil moist for longer periods of time. Re-check mulch levels in the Fall. Do not forget to water in dry winters if you winter is dry and the soil has not frozen where you live in winter. To winter protect as the plant goes dormant, you can make a cage of chicken wire around the shrubs or around each shrub if they are not beside each other. There should more than 2" between the end of the stems and the chicken wire (blooms develop usually near the end of the stems). Pile on dead Fall leaves or use mulch to provide protection from winter. Put a cardboard on top and use something to hold it in place (rocks, etc). Leftover leaves should be added during the middle of winter as leaves settle so, re-ck to see if you need to add more in 2016. Remove the winter protection approximately 2 weeks after your average date of last frost where you live (nurseries can tell you this if you do not know). When Spring 2016 arrives or before, get the soil checked for NPK Levels.

You can do a formal soil test or get a cheapo soil test kit usually sold at plant nurseries or available by mail. If nitrogen levels are high, use low nitrogen fertilizers. Examples of good Spring fertilizers for "new" hydrangeas are organic compost, compsted manure and cottonseed meal (about 1/2 to 1 cup of any of those three). That is for the whole year provided you are not located in the extreme South, where an extra dose may be useful in July-August-ish if the shrubs go dormant on or after December. If phosphorus level are low, try using a high phosphorus fertilizer. Phosphorus is good for roots and blooms. Bone meal would be a good choice for this.

If you are going to replant, look for a location that provides dappled sun or morning sun & after shade. Down here in Texas, I look for a place on the east side of trees and walls that, during the summer, gets shade starting at 11am to 12pm. Also, make sure you can provide water there as well. Dig the new hole first. Water the plant the night before. And move as much of the rootball as you can. If necessary, use help to transport the shrub such the root ball does not collapse. The root system should not be large. The roots near the top 4" are used mostly to absorb water so try not to step on them or damage them (much). Moving the plants once the shrub is dormant is the best time; if you are here in the South, do not even think of transplanting now.

Luis

Oh, I just saw where you said you were in NC... I thought NC was a typo. Ha! Never mind... :)

Regular Al
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Luis,
Thanks for the information. I'm going to move them next spring to the backyard where they'll get morning full sun for about half day. For mulch I use leaf mulch because I have so many trees.

I really wanted a hydrangea that gets the huge white balls for a bloom and it sounds like this type I bought doesn't do that.

Yes I'm in North Carolina and we've had quite a bit of regular rain this year so I haven't been watering.
Al
Raleigh, N.C.

luis_pr
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Yes, H. macrophylla has blooms that come in two flavors: mophead blooms and lacecap blooms. The ones that Mariessi produces are lacecap blooms.

Some forms of H. arborescens also produce mophead and lacecap blooms too so either ask when buying or look at the plant label but beware: those labels can be way off because that is how I ended with a Nikko Blue that "produces lacecap flowers"... Ha.

Shirley Pinchev
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

In the Pacific Northwest the best time to transplant is in fall. Our winter rains help the plant get established and the winters are rather mild so there is usually no winter damage. Sept - Oct are the best months for us and for Northern California. National Climate zones can be a bit deceptive - 8b in the south east is very different from 8b in Washington and Oregon. The Sunset zone calculator is more accurate and is not only rating the lowest winter temperature, but other considerations like humidity, rain fall - winter or summer, differences in temperature from day to night and even highest daytime temps. That is why it is important to use both the location and the zone.

Regular Al
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Re: Is this a Hydrangea and should I move it?

Well if you think I should transplant in the fall let me know....

I'm hoping these start to grow and get some blooms , never had one. Hopefully in the new spot with morning sun
will do the trick.

Thanks,
A
Raleigh, N.C.

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