rosequartz
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Hydrangea Dropping Under Leaves

hello
about a week ago i bought a hydrangea it was full and beautiful. 2 days ago i noticed that its dropping the under leaves everyday. but on top its still full and green .could it be because i live in a hot climate the room temperature is about 27/30 degrees . i spray mist on it about 4 times a days because the room is dry . the other plants seems to be thriving well .

please help

thanks in advance x

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Lindsaylew82
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Location: Upstate, SC

Re: what im doing wrong :/

Welcome to the forum!

What size pot are you using? These like roomy abodes, and appreciate REALLY large pots.

Also, how much are you WATERING your plant?
Lindsay
Upstate, SC
USDA Zone 7b/ Sunset Zone 31

luis_pr
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Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Hurst, TX USA Zone 7b/8a

Re: what im doing wrong :/

You probably have a mix of things going on. First, be aware that, except for limited periods of time, hydrangeas do not do well inside the house. The inside of the house during winter and summer tends to get dry and they do not like that.

Planting them outside in the summer is another example of stress for these water loving plants too. But similar stress can happen inside the home in the Summer. Transplant shock is another issue with all plants when you bring them home from a coddled nursery location. The plants probably do well in Spring (or for a few weeks in Summer) but then they get stressed in the summer as soil moisture goes down and the sun is stronger. This stress can make some old leaves turn all yellow -including the leaf veins- and then drop. Stress from insufficient soil moisture can make the leaves brown out from the edges inwards. They can also suffer from a sun exposure that is longer than they had before at the plant nursery/grocery store/etc and turn all yellow, including the leaf veins. You can also see leaf wilting if the area is windy (think: air conditioner blowing air at them all day long) and they do not have sufficient water.

I would not spray mist hydrangea leaves because that can encourage development of fungal issues like powdery mildew.

If the number of affected leaves is not large in proprotion to the size of the bush, I would just monitor the sun exposure (a few hours fo morning sun), monitor the soil moisture, check air from a/c vents (move the shrub if it gets direct air) and make sure that you have some mulch to make the potting mix stay moist longer in the potted environment. If a finger inserted into the potting mix to a depth of 3" (2.5 cm) feels dry, water it again. Probably best to water until you see water seeping out; stop watering; when the water stops coming out, add the remaining water. On a shrub that is planted on the ground, 1 gallon of water (about 3.8 liters) per watering is sufficient.

Many hydrangeas sold at grocery stores or florists are meant for short term use. Basically, the companies want you to enjoy the blooms and then dispose of the plants. Some of them are not winter hardy varieties but some are. Unfortunately, they do not advertise the variety's name so one is left at a loss as to 'can I plant it outside?' and 'will it survive my winters?' In my climate zone 8, they can probably grow well outdoors but in cooler zones, they may struggle. A Hydrangea macrophylla like yours can withstand winters as cold as Zone 6 or 7.

Shirley Pinchev
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Location: Shoreline wa

Re: Hydrangea Dropping Under Leaves

I bought a hydrangea on impulse at the grocery store and wound up with a weird named plant that turned out to be Fuji Falls. It is almost 7 years old and over 6 ft tall and absolutely a stunner! It took several years to get comfortable in the garden (languished would be a good description) but for the last three years has bloomed its head off. Will post some photos tomorrow. I am in Shoreline WA - just north of Seattle and we have the perfect climate for most hydrangeas. Easy to grow and yet most gardens are full of Rhodies and Azaleas and really exciting Hydrangeas are hard to find. The Rhodies bloom for a few weeks as do the Azaleas and the Hydrangeas bloom for months and I even let most of the blossoms - those that do not go into bouquets - dry on the plants so we have changing color and texture from spring till frost. In December the dried blossoms are used in holiday decorations. They are truly the plants that keep on giving.

luis_pr
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Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Hurst, TX USA Zone 7b/8a

Re: Hydrangea Dropping Under Leaves

Great minds have the same taste. I got my Fuji Waterfall as a present and it came from Kroger's! Ha! Unfortunately, mine has bloomed poorly. The last two winters here have been rough on it and also on other macs and oakleafs. While temps have gotten cold in winter, the temp fluctuations have been the problem as they cause the plant to break dormancy. And since winters are mild, I never winter protect so I that is the price I pay on these strange winters. Oh well. But I do like its blooms too! Just miss them. Enjoy your shrub Shirley!

Shirley Pinchev
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Location: Shoreline wa

Re: Hydrangea Dropping Under Leaves

Here are some shots of Fuji Falls - the grocery store buy. It is very friendly with one of the Endless Summers! lol As you can see I don't do a lot of pruning because I love the tall rambling bushes. The top of the chain link fence is 5 ft. high. I will cut the Endless tomorrow and start to dry them for a Holiday project for our garden club. We use them for decorations for a local women's shelter.
best BBB_0121 (1) fuji falls 1a.jpg
best BBB_0121 (1) fuji falls 1a.jpg (31.1 KiB) Viewed 2979 times
BBB_0141 Fuji falls and Endless Summer.jpg
The purple and pink blossoms are Purple Passion - usually know for the wonderful red and maroon leaves. All website say that the blossoms are just so-so, but a closer look reveals beautiful blossoms in many colors and they are alive with bees and other critters all summer. I think PP is one of the most wonderful in the garden. It also does not get pruned very much. So, it flops a bit - but who cares.
BBB_0026 1Plum Passion 2.jpg
BBB_0026 1Plum Passion 2.jpg (45.99 KiB) Viewed 2979 times
BBB_0102 Plum Passion Blossoms.jpg
BBB_0124 bee 2 a.jpg
Attachments
BBB_0126 (1) fuji 2 2.jpg

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Hydrangea Dropping Under Leaves

Wow these are gorgeous!

I might have to re-think hydrangea and give them a few spots in the garden.... I need to find the ideal micro-climate in my garden for them.....

Thank you for sharing these photos!

...also... Please share what you do with them. Sounds very interesting 8)
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

Shirley Pinchev
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Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 9:22 pm
Location: Shoreline wa

Re: Hydrangea Dropping Under Leaves

What do I do with them? Interesting question to a collector! lol I propagate many for me and my friends. the hydrangeas are constant and willing subjects for photographs and for the hydrangea poster that was created this year. We also use many for Christmas decorations. I dry different ones and bring them to our garden club workshop. Some are spray painted silver, gold and white - I will try red this year. We found that you don't have to cover the blossoms completely with paint - especially the gold or silver. A light brush with the spray highlights them without looking super fake. We use lots of greens - for swags, and door hangings, wire in the dried blossoms and other holiday ornaments and some cute and silly stuff. Small bunches are wired into wreaths with bells, pine cones of many sizes and what ever seems to work. Table arrangement are also done and the ladies are very creative and use lots of stuff along with the greens and other dried stuff. Because there are children at the shelter, we do not use berries or anything that can not be safely wired into the decorations. I am hopeless when it comes to the wreaths and most of the decorations so I provide lots of greens and blossoms. If anyone is interested, I will take photos at the workshop and of some of the finished products. In one evening we create 20 - 30 different pieces and this way we are able to share our bounty.

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