shaefins
Senior Member
Posts: 161
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:17 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, 6A

I've killed it, haven't I?

Bought a hydrangea last weekend from a local nursery. Haven't planted yet (no time). I missed one night of watering - too focused on getting them indoors due to a frost advisory. The next day, it went up to 80. That was yesterday. Plant was limp and falling over. I watered it...very well. Some leaves look better, but most of them are actualy crunchy. Green...but crunchy. And some have black spots in the middle.

Is there any hope for this plant? If not...any tips for getting a nursery to swap out a new plant due to stupidity on my part? :?

luis_pr
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Posts: 815
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Hurst, TX USA Zone 7b/8a

shaefins, can you clarify the statement about watering and frost the next day? Did the plant stay outside when there was frost? Another question, are you saying that you have to water every night?

shaefins
Senior Member
Posts: 161
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:17 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, 6A

I bought the plants on a Saturday, and checked them every evening. They were fairly light and dry every night, so I did water them...except for one. We had two nights w/ frost advisories Wed & Thurs and I brought them into my kitchen. But one of those nights I didn't water, and the temps went way up the next day.

Hope that clarifies the situation!

luis_pr
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Posts: 815
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Hurst, TX USA Zone 7b/8a

Hi, shaefins. If the leaves are crunchy, it sounds like they dried out but the plant will leaf out replacements after a while provided the plant remains healthy. Usually this happens during fall when cold winds and freezing temperatures damage the leaves. Late frosts can also do that. But if you are keeping the plant indoors when it is cold, I do not understand how the leaves were affected.

Lack of moisture can cause problems but that subject puzzles me. The amount of watering that you are having to do -daily- sounds like a lot. Let me ask you a few questions that may give all of us readers a clue.... Are the plants in the nursery's plastic pots or a pot that you purchased? How big of a pot are we talking about? How much water do you give the plants daily? Are the shrubs in a windy location that causes the soil to dry out quickly? Do the plants not have some mulch? Does the potting soil mix contain a lot of sand?

shaefins
Senior Member
Posts: 161
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:17 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, 6A

Plant was still in the pot it came in from the nursery (hadn't had time to plant it yet). I'd say the pot was maybe 6"-8" across and maybe 8"-10" high? Plant was maybe 8"-10" tall and well leafed, with flower buds already on it. When I watered, I did it until the water came out the bottom of the pot. No idea what the potting mix was. Area where is was does get some wind, depending on the weather. It was full sun.

Here's the kicker...I had to go back to the nursery last night to grab something. Didn't think to bring the plant w/ me, but I mentioned to the person there what happened, and I went over to where the plants were.....and lots of them had the same damage mine did! She was very quick to say it was frost damage, but then I told her that I had brought my plants indoors both nights we had frost. She had no answer for me then, and just told me to bring the plant back. Not sure I want one of the other ones though, given they have the same brown, crunchy leaf damage. Wonder what the heck it is. :?

ESMcLane
Cool Member
Posts: 70
Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2010 12:28 am
Location: Western Massachusetts

sun or partial sun?

I planted a hydrangea last year that was originally potted. The area I planted it in is partial sun I would say.

It's pretty small right now- & I believe hydrangeas take a few years (as a lot of plants do) to get established and grow in size.

So, my question is, do they require full sun or partial? Is my assumption correct in thinking they take a while to get larger?

We have another hydrangea in our yard that has been here for years- it's a good size and has beautiful flowers. Thats why I'm assuming it will take a few years to get established so to speak.

thanks :)

luis_pr
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Posts: 815
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Hurst, TX USA Zone 7b/8a

The further that one goes closer to Canada, the less intense the sun is. As a result, many hydrangeas can be grown in even full sun when one lives in the northern part of the country. In Texas and Florida, for example, they need to receive shade by 12pm. But in Mass, you get more flexibility. It definitely will not complain if you give it afternoon shade so enjoy.

Hydrangeas are not slow growers like camellias. A plant in a 1 gallon pot will grow "quickly" if it gets proper moisture, a little fertilizer and some sunlight. It is hard for me to guess how quickly because we have a longer growing period here. But it may reach 3' in 3-4 or so many years maybe?

For hydrangea care information, see this link:
https://www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/

Luis

shaefins
Senior Member
Posts: 161
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 11:17 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, 6A

Just wanted to post an update. The plant fully recovered, grew lots of new, healthy leaves and flowered beautifully! Glad I didn't give up on it! Now....to keep the deer that seem to have just found my house away from it, LOL!

luis_pr
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Posts: 815
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Hurst, TX USA Zone 7b/8a

I think that a 5 mile wide moat around the hydrangea will help against deer! Hee hee hee! :lol:

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