andywph
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Noted your suggestions. Will try them out.

Thanks. :)

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applestar
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I agree that the plant looks like it wants a bit more light. Also, somewhat yellowed leaf with the brown tip in the 3rd picture looks indicative of drought shock -- i.e. it got dried out at one point -- mint does prefer not to dry out. What looks like mummified leaf in th 2nd picture concerns me though. Is it covered with white fungus? It could be powdery mildew.

Also, you mentioned small flies? Are they tiny and have pointed abdomen? I'm thinking fungus gnats. One way to tell is to take a yellow or white piece of plastic, either cut a spike or attach it to a spike/stick/chopstick so the plastic is just above the foliage or sticking out to the side next to the soil level and smear it with petrolium jelly. Fungus gnats will stick to it. Another way is to unpot your plant and examine the soil. You'll see tiny squirmy maggots. They suck the roots, so you want to get rid of them. I usually do one of three things -- flood the soil with soapy water, sprinkle the soil with Food grade or horticultural Diatomaceous Earth powder, OR use Bt for Fungus Gnats when I have it. If you flood with soapy water you'll want to use coconut oil, vegetable glycerin or other soap without any chemical additives or fragrances. Don't make the solution too strong, though I've used thoroughly bubbly, soapy water which seems to kill the adults instantly in the bubbles -- in which case, I follow with plain water to rinse out the excess soap, which I believe can have drying effects on the plant and burn it.

If you decide to unpot your plant, check to see if the pot is full of roots or if the roots are mushy and decaying. If either, as long as you have the plant out of the pot, trim off about 1/4 of the decaying or healthy pot-bound roots and put some fresh potting soil, preferably containing compost, in the bottom and around the roots when re-potting. You could also try mixing in some used coffee grounds, tea leaves, or ground up seaweed. In the ground, mint hardly needs fertilizing, in fact, they're supposed to lose flavor if you do so go easy with the fertilizer, whatever you use, but try to use an organic fertilizer since you're presumably growing this mint for culinary purpose.

Your trap may also reveal whiteflies, which often results in progressively yellowing leaves in houseplants. They are also easily discovered by gently stroking the tops of your plant with your hand -- whiteflies will immediately fly around and then settle back down. You can CAREFULLY vacuum up the ones that fly up. I also like using plain or slightly warm weak soapy water shower for this one -- cover the soil with foil or plastic wrap so it doen't all fall out, lay the pot on the side and thoroughly drench.

If that mummified leaf is due to powdery mildew (I don't really see evidence of it in the whole-plant photo) you might try the 1 part skim milk:10 part water spray.

Mostly, try to give your plant more light -- even moving it a few inches closer to the window or raising the pot a few inches will help -- which way does the window face anyway? North, East, West, South? Do you have a desk lamp you can shine on it? Setting the pot on white surface, aluminum foil, or a mirror helps too. You can harvest the top 1/3 to 1/2 of the mint so it'll get bushier. (You don't have to do this all at once.)

That's all I can think of at the moment.
Good luck! :wink:

andywph
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Well I am living in the east.

The window is facing the southwest though.

Seems like whiteflies by your description.

But the flies looks black?

Or are they meant to be black in colour? :?

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applestar
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Hmph. You really ought to do your own Googling, but I'll let it pass this time... :wink:

Fungus gnats are black with a pointy abdomen like I said: https://www.hort.uconn.edu/IPM/greenhs/htms/fngnatser.htm
[img]https://www.hort.uconn.edu/IPM/greenhs/pics/fgsfpics1.JPG[/img]
With mint, you don't really want to dry out the soil although that's the simplest and effective way to get rid of them (This method works well for me with African violets and Orchids) That's why I suggested the other methods above.

Whiteflies are white: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitefly
[img]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/Weisse-Fliege.jpg/250px-Weisse-Fliege.jpg[/img]

Southwest window should be bright enough, in fact, if the mint is in direct sunlight, I would think it would be too bright and too hot. It would account for the soil drying out fairly quickly. But by the looks of your photo, it DOES seem like the stems are elongated and reaching for more light. May be you're not turning the pot 1/4 turn every few days?

andywph
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I did google the two pests.

But the description is more like whiteflies just that they are black in colour.

I've checked the roots of my plant, there isnt any squirmy maggots.

When I stroke the plant, the flies fly around and then disappear almost immediately. I normally see them when I water the plant or when I happen to be trimming some of the leaves.

The roots of my plant seems ok though. Not mushy or decaying yet. I do not really see the roots at the bottom of the root ball. Just a few around the sides of it.

With regards to sunlight, they are not in direct sunlight. They are like 20cm below the windowstill.

I never turn my pot every few days thus I guess thats why the stems look elongated though. :oops:

andywph
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Thanks for the information though. :D

andywph
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[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_081.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_0810.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_082.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_083.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_084.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_085.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_086.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_087.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_088.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_089.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/30_7_08.jpg[/img]

andywph
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Any idea what causes this?

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Jess
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Could be any number of things. To me it looks like overwatering but it could also be hot/cold damage underwatering or just bruising from being brushed past or touched.

Having looked at the first picture you posted I have to ask if you are eating it? It looks far too leggy and sprawling. If you harvest some and make use of it the whole plant will thicken up and stand tall. Cutting the top inch or two off the whole plant will make it produce sideshoots and send up new growth from the base giving you a lush full looking plant.
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

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applestar
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Poor Andy - too dry, too wet. So which is it? Right?

I have to say, the mints in these latest pics are similar to what I find in my damp, shady mint patch or, in a sunny plot, near the base of mints that are growing too closely together -- i.e. tops are healthy but the lower leaves start to look like these. I always thought it was due to high humidity and lack of air circulation -- leaves/stems staying too damp, resulting in mildew damage, but this just my opinion.

Good luck. :wink:

andywph
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Well I don't think it's too wet or too dry cause i place the water at the bottom and let the plant absorb what it requires. I don't exactly water the plant, just refill the bottom part when it's low.

I guess it can be due to mildew cause it has been raining the past few days.

I'll harvest more in the next few days. I'm still trying out various dishes with mint.

Thanks. :)

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Jess
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andywph wrote:Well I don't think it's too wet or too dry cause i place the water at the bottom and let the plant absorb what it requires. I don't exactly water the plant, just refill the bottom part when it's low.
If by "when it's low" you mean you never leave it to dry out then it is too wet.
Mint likes a moist soil but not a wet one. If you let the saucer remain dry for a few days then the soil will still stay moist. By letting the plant constantly sit in water it will eventually start to rot.
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

andywph
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Oh. That means my mint is rotting? No wonder all the black flies. :oops:

What can I do now?

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Jess
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Don't panic Andy. It is still a very healthy looking plant. I don't think you have done any major damage yet. Just leave it dry for a week and see how it looks. After a week stick you finger in the soil up to your first knuckle (about an inch or 2.5 cm if you think in metric :lol: ) If the soil feels dry at that depth water it, if not leave it another few days. Few plants die quickly from being underwatered. Most are killed from too much.

To use more mint why not make tea. Either with ordinary tea add some mint leaves to flavour it or just add a whole bunch of leaves to some boiling water and add sugar to taste...I always add a strawberry or two in season...yum! Serve hot or cold.
Mint also goes well with new potatoes. (not sure if you eat them in Singapore) Once cooked chop some mint and sprinkle over potatoes with a small nob of butter...delicious!
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

andywph
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Ok. I'll follow your suggestions.

Hope it doesnt die.

andywph
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I've recently repotted my mint.

Here are the latest photos.

[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/07_08_08.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/07_08_082.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/07_08_081.jpg[/img]

The black spots on the leaves are still appearing everyday.

The flies have gone though. Thanks for all your help.

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Jess
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Looking pretty good Andy. I would pinch out the tops now to help it thicken up.
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

andywph
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Noted. Will do that as soon as I get another pot to place all the rest in. Thanks. :)

Bebop
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not sure if this was posted, but dividing your mint plant will also help it out.
I bought an ungodly amount of chocolate mint that was doing very poorly in the sun at a nursery I'm a regular out. They sold me about 9 plants at $1.50 each.
I divided each and every one and put them in the shade. I got a bunch of rooted cuttings and they're so much more bushier than before.
Hope this helps!
>^.^<
Jess and James White
+ Queen Isabella AKA Kittybutts

What I have growing?
Mints: Chocolate, pineapple, orange
Lemon Verbena, French Tarragon, Catnip
>^.^<

andywph
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Noted. I'll try, thanks. :)

andywph
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Bad news.

The fungus gnats are back in greater numbers than before.

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=10036

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applestar
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Did you try the sticky trap?
Another trap that seems to work (at least for American fungus gnats) is a shallow container (bowl, plate, etc. -- think maximum surface area) of soapy water (use a flowery scented soap or shampoo -- I use my kids' shampoo which smells like violets) under a light source (I use a night light but I imagine a desk lamp or even a flashlight will work) Leave it on overnight and see what happens.
Good luck. :twisted:

andywph
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Tried the sticky trap. Not effective.

Will try the soap water.

Keep you updated in a few days.

Thanks. :)

andywph
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applestar wrote:Did you try the sticky trap?
Another trap that seems to work (at least for American fungus gnats) is a shallow container (bowl, plate, etc. -- think maximum surface area) of soapy water (use a flowery scented soap or shampoo -- I use my kids' shampoo which smells like violets) under a light source (I use a night light but I imagine a desk lamp or even a flashlight will work) Leave it on overnight and see what happens.
Good luck. :twisted:
Seems like a bit of oil in the water helps with attracting the adults.

I made the neem mixture, around 1 tsp to 1 litre of water with 1/4 tsp of dish detergent. Got some leftovers and left them in a bowl. Caught quite a few dead adults in 1 day. :)

andywph
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Here are the latest pictures.

[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/21_08_081.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/21_08_082.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/andywph/mint/21_08_08.jpg[/img]

damethod
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Looking good! I can see that your soil is pretty moist. If your mint is indoors 100% of the time, you shouldn't need more than two waterings per week.

Ria
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Hello to all herb growers,

I mentioned my interest in herb gardening earlier this summer. Sorry I miised out on previous discussions on growing herbs. I was unavailable for a while, then my computer died.

Currently have a collction of 5 different mints. They make great herbal teas. I used my orange mint for the first time this summer to add a nice flavor to my water .(Bruising it and adding to a jug of water). I gave some to a friend for tea and she loved it. Mint does well in partial sun and has average water needs, does not necessarily need fertilizer. Some of my other herbs did not do well this summer Maybe beacue we had alot of rian?? Seems my basils did not apprecate that I know they love the sun.. I am about to start a new set for the fall but have not yet planted then out because we are still getting some rain. The thyme also did not like the rain, I had four differnt types. My sage plants of 3 years, which were doing so well suddenly died .I am not sure what happened. Any suggestions?? I was looking forward to stuffing fresh home grown sage in my turkey this thanksgiving . I bought 2 new plants last week so will be using some of those.

I use different herbs in just about every dish I prepare. Others, like the mints, and lemon grass I use for tea. I steep my lavender leaves for a foot bath or full bath, others are grown for ornamental purposes or for their fragrance . I dry a lot of the edible herbs and give to my friends and relatives who are now getting excited about experimenting with new herbs in their dishes. They add so much to a meal or give such a lift to your mood when you walk by and pinch a piece off and sniff.

Happy gardening.
Ria

herchelle
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taming the mints

Years ago my gardening mentor told me about planting mints and other evasive plants in the garden using pots with the bottom cut out. I plant my mint right into the garden and the pot acts as a barrier so the mint stays where I want it to be, nice and contained
[img]https://i410.photobucket.com/albums/pp186/herchelle_photo/ChocolateMint.jpg[/img]

mintjp
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Strange curly patterns on my Apple Mint leaves

Moved my post to Herb Gardening Forum
[url]https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=10555[/url]
Please help :(

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