Choggy
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Location: London, UK

Need to move some lavender and need advice

Hello all, you've been very helpful in the past when I was looking forward to having a garden. Now that I've moved in and am trying to sort out the (very neglected) garden and get it how I want, I'm hoping you can help again :)

There are a couple of lavendar plants in a shaded spot (I read elsewhere on this forum that they need sun, but they seem to be good and healthy... more so than anything else in this garden other than brambles right now!). I want to move them to pots or perhaps troughs (eventually I may have to give them away - my partner doesn't like bees ;) ). They're kind of big, though - is it possible to split the roots and if so how would I do that without damaging them?

I know it's probably the wrong time of year to be doing this, but I'm keen to get the garden sorted (which will involve a lot of work - I want to build raised beds this winter so that I can grow vegetables at a height which won't kill my already weak back).

I'm in London in the UK and the temperature is dropping at the moment. It's also quite wet (and has been for a lot of the later summer).

Should I cut the lavender back before moving the plants? I've heard that lavendar needs to be cut well back, but I don't really know how far back I can go without damaging the plants.

I've also read that they prefer poor, well drained soil so I figure that planting them into compost isn't a great idea.

I guess this post has been a bit rambly, but it's because I really haven't a clue where to start with this job! Some general advice about moving these plants would be great, please!

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Grey
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Well, I am new to lavender too - but I should think that before it gets cold it would be a good time to move it. Depends on how cold things are for you there right now - our days here are perfect for moving many plants this time of year.

As for cutting back - I'd love to know that too! Anybody?

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Jess
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Hi Choggy :D

I don't know about you but the weather here today has just been downright miserable :(

Back to the lavender. Not splittable (is that a word?) I'm afraid. You will have to move the whole thing. Cut back now but NOT hard. You want to cut to about an inch or so below the flowering stalk or easier still grab it together like a ponytail and just chop straight across. Pot it up in ordinary compost that has plenty of gritsand added to it or use John Innes no 3. Make sure you crock the bottom of the pot well too.
Next year when it is starting to grow (usually around April) cut it hard back but never below fresh new growth. If you go into old wood it will just curl up its toes and die.
Grey you only need to do this to Lavender plants that have not be pruned for a while. Regularly prune in the Spring by about a half if they have been pruned before but look a bit straggly.
[img]https://i196.photobucket.com/albums/aa291/growit/tobesorted155.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i196.photobucket.com/albums/aa291/growit/DSC01550.jpg[/img]
My lavender in this picture is getting on for 10 years old and by pruning twice a year you get a nice big fat plant full of flowers. :D

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Grey
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Jess, your lavender is so much greener than mine!

So far the only lavender I have been able to grow reliably here in N. GA is called Provence Lavender, the foliage is almost grey. Very pretty. So far it's plenty clumpy not straggly, good to know on the trimming though!

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Jess
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Grey I grow lavender hidcote. It doesn't grow too tall as out the front of my house, where the hedge is planted, is extremely windy. Almost like a funnel of wind that tears through my herb garden. Anything too spindly or brittle just gets broken. Hidcote is very green when the new growth starts. I like the grey coloured form that you grow but I don't think it would last very long in the conditions I have. :(

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Grey
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It's really pretty. It prolly wouldn't grow here though. Many lavenders seem to picky about where they want to be, I've tried many kinds said to grow well here. Such a lovely plant though - on some mornings I can smell it halfway across the yard. :)

Anonymous

Choggy,

Im new here and after reading this thread I am curious as to what you did and what the results are so far.

I grow several Lavenders and none are green all are picky and I only prune in spring after new growth,I did move 2 of my 2 year old ones in Sept and so far they are still alive. I did however take several cuttings and root them just in case they didnt make it; so now I have more lavenders to enjoywhich lessens the price that I paid for the two older ones. :D

Lovely Lavenders
:D

Kale

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Location: Elko, NV

Rooting Lavender

How does one "root" lavender? Do I just take a "cutting" off of a normal lavender plant and place it in water or soil?

I have done this with roses and it has worked wonderfully. I tried it with a peony and it did not work, (with water anyway).

Anyone?

Thanks in advance

Glo in NE NV
...I used to have special powers but my therapist took them away....

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Jess
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I have found the best way is in soil not water. Just cut a length of a few inches from semi-ripe wood and put about 5 cuttings around the edge of a pot filled with free draining potting compost. Do not use peat based as it is too soggy.
Place in a warm area that is not too sunny but gets lots of indirect sunlight and water just enough to keep the soil moist as these are mediterannean herbs and hate wet!
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

Rosie51
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We have lots of thriving lavendar plants at our place and it is because it is hot here, dryer and the soil has lots of sand in it. It drains well.

I'm so thankful to find this informatin on how to propagate it since I've wanted more plants here. We have a long driveway up the hill and I would like to plant lavendar plants going all the way up the hill. You don't have to water them much at all and they look so pretty. I love the scent too!

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Jess
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Rosie mine sow themselves in my soil. Like you I have free draining soil in lots of sun so I have little need to propagate as they do it for me. Shame I can't pop round with some seedlings. :D
Have a check around your existing plants and see if you have any babies hiding.
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

Rosie51
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Thanks Jess for the idea--I will do that tomorrow!! Do you think it is okay to transplant them now? I live in the pacific northwest area, on the east side of the State of Washington--the dry side. It will frost here in October, probably towards the end of October so we have another 4-6 weeks before frost. I don't want to transplant these babies only to have them die, if I can avoid it.

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Jess
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No I wouldn't move them yet.
Better to do them once your weather is warming up next year.
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

Rosie51
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Thanks Jess---I already decided to wait and to read your post gave me assurance my decision was the right one. It is getting cooler here already.

Oh but I can hardly wait for Spring to come and see what I can transplant!! :)

chio88
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Jess,
Love your lavenders. :D

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Jess
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Rosie I just weeded out the front between some bricks on a raised plinth and found five babies!! I hope you are equally lucky.

Chio...thanks :D and nice to meet you.
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

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