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OROZCONLECHE
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Herb ID

I found this growing outside its very strong in scent and flavor, I only tried a little bit sense im not sure what it is and its now flowering so does anyone know what this is?
[img]https://i1228.photobucket.com/albums/ee442/OROZCOVICTOR/2012-06-17T01-08-11_0.jpg[/img]
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rainbowgardener
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I think maybe feverfew...

[img]https://findmeacure.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/feverfew-bsp.jpg[/img]


the name comes because it was used medicinally.

Here's the website the picture came from with more info

https://findmeacure.com/2008/12/16/feverfew-2/
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lorax
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Definitely Feverfew - I've got the single-bloom cultivar in my garden.

Apart from its uses in people, a tea made from the leaves (and then cooled, obviously) is an excellent aphid spray.

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OROZCONLECHE
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Oh wow thanks i guess ama be making some aphid repelent now :D
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PunkRotten
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You can make tea with it too. I thought it was chamomile at first but saw the petals and the middle of the flower is different.

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rainbowgardener
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Feverfew has a bunch of common names but one of them is wild chamomile.
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OROZCONLECHE
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I made about 16onces of Tea im going to use it as repellent for the bugs, should i dilute it, it came out pretty yellow, will this hurt my plants? should I spray at the bed of the ground or directly at the plant? and what is it good for human consumption ?
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rainbowgardener
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Use it where your bugs are. I don't think it could hurt your plants, but I never recommend spraying your whole garden with anything without testing it on a couple plants first. Incidentally, like regular chamomile, feverfew is a pretty good anti-fungal. You have probably read where I have said I keep chamomile in the water I water my indoor seedlings with to keep them from getting damping off fungus or the fungus in the soil that attracts fungus gnats. Your feverfew tea should work like that too. You could try spraying it on your plants if they are starting to get powdery mildew or something.

I don't have it in my garden and haven't used it. The article I linked to the first time talks about medicinal uses in people. In general it could be used for anything you might use aspirin for. HOWEVER, you should always remember that using herbal remedies is not like using our concentrated modern medicine. Feverfew tea taken on a regular basis might be very helpful if you have chronic headaches, arthritis pain etc. But you can't think if you have a migraine right now, drinking a cup of feverfew tea is going to do much for it. Most herbal remedies are pretty mild and have to be used regularly over a period of time to really make a difference.
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lorax
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"Pretty yellow" is about the concentration I brew it as an aphid spray. RBG - I wasn't aware it also had antifungal action - I'll have to start using it on my tomatoes when the powdery mildew rears its ugly, spotty head. Them and my Dahlias.

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OROZCONLECHE
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Ive been getting headaches but im actually kinna scare to take teas from the gardens idk why
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PunkRotten
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I'd rather take teas made from my garden than manufactured stuff. Lots of stuff that grows is free medicine. I know what you mean though about being scared. I was that way when eating edible weeds. But if many people have been using a plant/weed/herb for many years and can confirm their uses with no bad effects then I trust it for the most part.

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OROZCONLECHE
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Yea im tryingto eat as much from my garden and lear its medicinal properties, they can be a cheap and effective way to cure or get better if ill
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rainbowgardener
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Yes, in general I would rather take something from my garden than be a guinea pig for testing out new medicines.

The herbs that have their medicinal properties built into their names, feverfew, boneset, all-heal, and all the ones with officinalis in their scientific name, have been used medicinally for probably 1000 years. That doesn't mean it will be effective for all the things the traditional medicine might claim (cure cancer etc). Back in the traditional medicine days they didn't have any OTHER medicines, so they tried all kinds of herbal stuff for serious illnesses. But it does pretty much mean it won't hurt you. For medicinal purposes I look for the ones that have traditional history AND modern science to back it up. EG:

In 1985, it was reported that extracts of feverfew inhibited the release of 2 inflammatory substances; serotonin from platelets and prostaglandin from white blood cells. Both are thought to contribute to the onset of migraine attacks and perhaps even to play a role in rheumatoid arthritis.

Migraine sufferers may have to wait several months to notice improvement, but the wait is well worth it. Some 80% of all cases have found feverfew a preventive in migraine headaches.
https://medicinalherbinfo.org/herbs/Feverfew.html

The active compound in Feverfew called parthenolide occurs in a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine. It seems to block substances in the body that widen and constrict blood vessels and cause inflammation leading to migraines

Feverfew has also been used for centuries for arthritis. It is thought to hinder the production of prostaglandins. These are hormone-like substances that cause pain and inflammation

https://www.naturalnews.com/028426_Feverfew_herbs.html#ixzz1yKOp3Qmo

But NOTE: Feverfew can be taken as a tea but the medicinal compounds make it extremely bitter. It may be more palatable if mixed with some honey or taken with food.

AND Feverfew [like aspirin and other OTC pain relievers] may increase the tendency to bleed (prevent blood-clotting) so check with your health care practitioner if you are taking anticoagulants before embarking on a Feverfew treatment.

And because I love the stories behind names, I thought it was cool when I found this: Feverfew has one of the longest histories of any herb. The legend is that it was used to save the life of a ancient Greek construction worker who fell off the roof of the Parthenon. This explains the derivation of its scientific name Tanacetum parthenium.

So more than you ever wanted to know, sorry, but just using this as an example...
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Interesting thread. I've read that willow tree bark is good for headaches, and a systemic for plants. The current sythnesized product is in aspirin.
I don't recall the key ingredient name- ah got it : salicylic acid
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