User avatar
PunkRotten
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1989
Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2011 8:48 pm
Location: Monterey, CA.

Growing Chamomile, Oregano, and sweet Marjoram

Hi,

I ahve an area that is about 7 foot long and 16 inches wide. I was thinking about planting some chamomile, oregano, sweet marjoram, and a few flowers like marigolds and nasturtiums. Would these all be good planting together?


Can they all tolerate the same type of soil, or do they have way different needs? I have cactus mix and also regular garden soil.

CharlieBear
Green Thumb
Posts: 588
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2011 5:19 pm
Location: Pacific NW

I am assuming this is box garden thing. Use general potting soil. You can plant them all together, just remember that herbs once established will be less potent if you water too often. Warning nasturiums can be a real problem, they self sow very readily. I have some coming back up this summer where I had some growing 4 years ago, so be careful. The same problem occurs often with some types of chamomile and they can become real weeds. Also overtime things could get a little crowded in the box if you let them all just do their thing

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25279
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Sounds nice. And even if the herbs start multiplying, they aren't bad as "weeds" easy to pull and then you have more herbs! :)
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

Susan W
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1858
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:46 pm
Location: Memphis, TN

Try it, and give each group space. Oregano can spread, but easily contained in its alloted space pulling out non wanted. Nasturtiums don't like hot weather. I had a few in the spring, and just started 2 pots for fall. For some reason, I can't do much with chamomile. Marjoram is slow to get going, also grows very low to ground. It can easily get lost in the in ground garden. Chives would add a nice contrast in texture. This could be a good place for a couple of sage plants .Also consider a couple of perennial flowers (coneflower, blanket flower, coreopsis, yarrow, daisies, salvia)
Have fun!
Susan

User avatar
PunkRotten
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1989
Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2011 8:48 pm
Location: Monterey, CA.

Susan W wrote:Try it, and give each group space. Oregano can spread, but easily contained in its alloted space pulling out non wanted. Nasturtiums don't like hot weather. I had a few in the spring, and just started 2 pots for fall. For some reason, I can't do much with chamomile. Marjoram is slow to get going, also grows very low to ground. It can easily get lost in the in ground garden. Chives would add a nice contrast in texture. This could be a good place for a couple of sage plants .Also consider a couple of perennial flowers (coneflower, blanket flower, coreopsis, yarrow, daisies, salvia)
I have some Yarrow now about a foot tall. I want to divide it and plant some there. But would it take over the whole area? Also, would nasturtiums prefer part sun/part shade? How about 2 hours sun only?

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25279
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 6:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

I have some yarrow in one of my front flower beds, along with a whole bunch of other stuff crammed in there-- over the years, it's gotten very crowded. Given the competition, the yarrow doesn't take over at all. It held its own for a long time, currently might be in danger of getting choked out if I don't help it a bit.

The nasturtium does better with part shade than full sun. I grow mine under the tomatoes, where it gets considerably shaded by them and it does great.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

User avatar
PunkRotten
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1989
Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2011 8:48 pm
Location: Monterey, CA.

Ok that is good to hear. I may even add some lavender to the section.

Susan W
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1858
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:46 pm
Location: Memphis, TN

PR, I hope you have patience and challenge!
Sometimes we have a plan, in head and sketched, plant, it may or may not work. There are no guarantees in this business! As I have implied before, try some things. Some may take off, some just sit, and some just don't do.

Another factor not mentioned is how much of any herb/veg/flower used or not used. This takes a year or two or many to figure out. I am in the many category.

An added note, you have things going along, then some fungus or bug thing has other plans. I am realizing the white fly is happy on my tarragon. I had been thinking that when inside, NO, those buggers are outside!
Have fun!
Susan

User avatar
PunkRotten
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1989
Joined: Sat Apr 16, 2011 8:48 pm
Location: Monterey, CA.

I am trying to pretty up our walkway to out door. Its like a flower bed and it is bald. There is 2 gardenias ( I think that is what they are) there from a few years back that still live, the others died. I just wanna add a bunch of flowers and herbs to make it look and smell nice. Thanks for the tips everyone.

User avatar
Gary350
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5479
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 1:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Growing Chamomile, Oregano, and sweet Marjoram

I bought some herbs yesterday and spent most of this morning reading about how to grow them. Most herbs like desert type soil with a lot of sand, they like full sun and they like hot weather. Marjoram grows about 3 feet tall like a bush, oregano and thyme are ground cover about 10" tall. Not sure about Chamomile. Herbs like sandy well drained soil with a ph of about 6.5 to 7. Rosemary makes a 5 ft tall bush.

I tried many times to grow herbs when I lived in TN but they always died. We had 300 days of rain every year, 100% humidity most of the time, and no sandy soil. TN has hot weather 105 degrees F, not as hot as AZ 115 degree F weather. I knew a chinese lady that grew herbs in a stack of 3 car tires filled with dirt. The dry well drained soil in the raised bed must have been what the herbs needed to grow in TN 30 miles south of Nashville.

Online information says. Greek Oregano grows better in hot weather than other Oregano. Greek oregano is often used in place of Italian oregano. Silver Thyme is slightly hot & spicy, it goes good on pizza and italian food and is not as strong as English Oregano,

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11684
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:32 am
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: Growing Chamomile, Oregano, and sweet Marjoram

Herbs encompasses a lot of different plants with many different growing requirements

The Mediterranean herbs like oregano, thyme, sage, rosemay, marjoram, lavender, do like to be in the sun and in well drained soil and do not need a lot of fertilizer or a lot of water once they are established. Gray leafed herbs in general like these conditions.

Then there are the mints and their relatives, basil, perilla, lemon balm. They prefer a richer soil and to be kept evenly moist.

There are also the herbs that require special conditions cilantro does not like heat, dill does not like rain (neither does lavender, the leaves will turn black), borage, nasturtiums, cammomile, caraway, fenugreek, like it cool but not so wet. Culantro can handle wet soil, but likes to be in the shade.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

Susan W
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1858
Joined: Mon Jul 06, 2009 2:46 pm
Location: Memphis, TN

Re: Growing Chamomile, Oregano, and sweet Marjoram

Gary, you will be doing some trial and error, lots of both!
I have found rosemary likes well drained, but also likes to be watered. The leaves are better if watered some. I have both in ground and large containers.
Chamomile may do better for you in the cooler winter months as it isn't much for heat.
Marjoram does well in a container, at least 12". For you I would set it with afternoon shade.
Oregano, about the same as marjoram, and put in large container. It has a fairly large root system and does need water. I have noticed it's one of the 1st herbs on my deck that show stress from lack of water. Some shade will help.
Cilantro doesn't do heat.
Thyme can be tried in ground and container, and see what works. I have been battling the caterpillars from H and seeing what is pulling through this season.

A side note, we can grow herbs even with lots of rain fall (Memphis beats Nashville for that honor!!).
Have fun!
Susan

User avatar
Gary350
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5479
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 1:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Re: Growing Chamomile, Oregano, and sweet Marjoram

This is my rosemary in the front yard. I trimmed it about a month ago. I cut 2 feet off the back side so I can walk between the bush and the house. I cut 3 feet off the front so it does not look so shabby. It is till about 5 foot diameter and 5 foot tall. I use it to cook with sometimes. It is on the north side of the house and only gets sun early morning until about 10 am then shade the rest of the day. It has an irrigation system that gives it about 1 quart of water every day.

Click the photo it gets larger. I think I posted this in the wrong place. Oh well.

Image

Mr green
Green Thumb
Posts: 372
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2015 6:08 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: Growing Chamomile, Oregano, and sweet Marjoram

Nice rosemary, wish i could have them planted in the ground like that!
Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished - Lao Tzu

lily51
Greener Thumb
Posts: 735
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:40 am
Location: Ohio, Zone 5

Re: Growing Chamomile, Oregano, and sweet Marjoram

Wow! we in Ohio envy those who can have Rosemary like this! Lucky you....beautiful plant.



Return to “Herb Gardening Forum”