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Gary350
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Chili powder

It has been many years since I have grown my own chili peppers to make my own chili powder. Today I planted chili pepper seeds enough for 32 plants. I also planted seeds for 8 Green chili plants.

One chili plant will make about 1 lb of chili powder. About every 10 years I grow chili peppers then I am stocked up for the next 10 years.

The food processor or kitchen blender will grind the chili into powder. It is a bit slow and the longer you grind it the more RED it gets and the more it looks like real chili powder.

It is best if you do this outside on a windy day so you can stand up wind while you pick out seeds and grind into power. I think blender does a better faster job than the food processor. I have 1 bag is chili peppers that have not been ground into powder yet so today I picked out the seeds and made chili powder.

The one on the left was ground about 5 minutes in the food processor. The one of the right was ground about 5 minutes in the kitchen blender.

I have a lot of seeds.

[img]https://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e358/gary350/Chili-01.jpg[/img]

https://www.youtube.com/user/Lowracerman?feature=mhw4#p/u/6/66H5P75jpXE
Last edited by Gary350 on Mon Mar 29, 2010 7:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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tn_veggie_gardner
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Lookin good, Gary. I might need to drive to the 'Boro to borrow some! =)

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Ozark Lady
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Gary, do you then blend your ground red peppers and add other spices to come up with your very own chili powder?

I buy cumin to make mine, because there seems to be no consistency in store bought chili powder. This year, I ordered cumin seeds to grow. But, I am just playing mad scientist, not grinding up the veggies in the first place, and just adding a dab of this and that to whatever I am cooking.

Do you have a recipe that you could post for us to use as a guide?
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

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Gary350
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Come on over I will give you some seeds.

I don't add anything to the chili powder it is 100% ground up dry red chili peppers. I add other spices when I make chili, India food, chinese, mexican, etc. I use a lot of cumin seed the only place I can find that sells it in 1 lb containers is Sams Club. I have not thought about growing my own cumin I sorta figure it will take up too much space in my already too small garden.

I like to use the red chili's before they turn red to make green chili sauce for mexican food. I like green chili Enchilada sauce.

I make my own Enchilada sauce.

I have misplaced my taco sauce recipe.

The long green chili's make excellent pico de gallo sauce.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salsa_(sauce)

I think chili powder is like fine wine. Some years it is better than others. It might have something to do with the weather.

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tn_veggie_gardner
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Gary: Awesome, thanks! =) We'll have to meet up. Want to do a trade? I do have a few packs of seeds. Anything you're interested in?

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Gary350
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tn_veggie_gardner wrote:Gary: Awesome, thanks! =) We'll have to meet up. Want to do a trade? I do have a few packs of seeds. Anything you're interested in?
The only thing I can think of that I need is a dump truck load of composted manure. My garden space is limited. I am not going to plant potatoes this year so that gives me a whole row to plant red chili peppers.

What do you have to offer?

I can mail you some chili pepper seeds postage is only about 50 cents.

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tn_veggie_gardner
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Well, I don't think I have any poo! lol...I do have quite the handful of tomato seedlings though, if you're interested. Sungold, Sungold Select II, Black Cherry & Amish Paste. Other than that, just a bunch of seed. =)

jmoore
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Re: Chili powder

Gary350 wrote:One chili plant will make about 1 lb of chili powder. About every 10 years I grow chili peppers then I am stocked up for the next 10 years.

The food processor or kitchen blender will grind the chili into powder. It is a bit slow and the longer you grind it the more RED it gets and the more it looks like real chili powder.
Does the chili powder keep for 10 years? I've heard that most spices start to lose their essential oils within a few months, so it's always better to get fresh stuff once a year or so to make sure the flavor is maximized. Of course making your own, it's gonna be better than any store bought stuff, so it might keep longer.


Have you ever used a coffee grinder? I have used one on occassion and it worked great. The capacity is not that large but the consistency is perfect.

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Gary350
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Re: Chili powder

jmoore wrote:
Gary350 wrote:One chili plant will make about 1 lb of chili powder. About every 10 years I grow chili peppers then I am stocked up for the next 10 years.

The food processor or kitchen blender will grind the chili into powder. It is a bit slow and the longer you grind it the more RED it gets and the more it looks like real chili powder.
Does the chili powder keep for 10 years? I've heard that most spices start to lose their essential oils within a few months, so it's always better to get fresh stuff once a year or so to make sure the flavor is maximized. Of course making your own, it's gonna be better than any store bought stuff, so it might keep longer.


Have you ever used a coffee grinder? I have used one on occassion and it worked great. The capacity is not that large but the consistency is perfect.
NO way can oils or anything else escape from a glass mason jar with a lid on top sealed up air tight. After many many years its just as good as the day it was made.

I make my own Taco Sauce, Enchilada Sauce too. It keeps in mason jars for many years. Did you know Enchilada Sauce is 95% water. It makes me mad to pay $1.00 for a can of water. Throw some onion, garlic, herbs, and water in a blender and make several gallons of sauce then put it all in pint size mason jars. I can make $100 worth of sauce for only a couple of dollars and the best part I made it to my own taste and it is all garden fresh with no toxic poisons added.

jmoore
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Re: Chili powder

I didn't think about Mason jars. I'm sure that adds plenty of shelf life to spices. I've also never actually gone to the effort to taste test spices of different ages. I just use whatever is in the cabinet and there is no way I could tell you how old they are. It just seemed like 10 years was a long time.

I've got a couple of pepper plants this year that I'll have to try this with. My family doesn't like extra spicy stuff, so a powder is a good alternative. I make a lot of spice rubs that we use a bunch so a fresh pepper will be a nice addition.

Gary350 wrote: NO way can oils or anything else escape from a glass mason jar with a lid on top sealed up air tight. After many many years its just as good as the day it was made.

I make my own Taco Sauce, Enchilada Sauce too. It keeps in mason jars for many years. Did you know Enchilada Sauce is 95% water. It makes me mad to pay $1.00 for a can of water. Throw some onion, garlic, herbs, and water in a blender and make several gallons of sauce then put it all in pint size mason jars. I can make $100 worth of sauce for only a couple of dollars and the best part I made it to my own taste and it is all garden fresh with no toxic poisons added.

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Gary350
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Re: Chili powder

jmoore wrote:I didn't think about Mason jars. I'm sure that adds plenty of shelf life to spices. I've also never actually gone to the effort to taste test spices of different ages. I just use whatever is in the cabinet and there is no way I could tell you how old they are. It just seemed like 10 years was a long time.

I've got a couple of pepper plants this year that I'll have to try this with. My family doesn't like extra spicy stuff, so a powder is a good alternative. I make a lot of spice rubs that we use a bunch so a fresh pepper will be a nice addition.

Gary350 wrote: NO way can oils or anything else escape from a glass mason jar with a lid on top sealed up air tight. After many many years its just as good as the day it was made.

I make my own Taco Sauce, Enchilada Sauce too. It keeps in mason jars for many years. Did you know Enchilada Sauce is 95% water. It makes me mad to pay $1.00 for a can of water. Throw some onion, garlic, herbs, and water in a blender and make several gallons of sauce then put it all in pint size mason jars. I can make $100 worth of sauce for only a couple of dollars and the best part I made it to my own taste and it is all garden fresh with no toxic poisons added.
Make sure it is dry before you seal it in a mason jar other wise it will mold. I put my spices on a paper plate on a shelf in the garage for a month then I grind it in the spice grinder or kitchen blender.

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