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Gary350
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I picked a ton of Basil this year it makes good Soup.

I picked a lot of Basil this year from 2 plants. I noticed that if I pinch off the tops of my plants it will grow 2 tops where it had 1 top before. If the plant has 20 tops and I pinch them all off in about 3 weeks it has 40 tops that are ready to pinch again. If I pinch them again they double again to 80 tops, then 160 tops then 320 tops. It turns the plant into a 3 foot diameter bush. I saved all the tops. Then in the fall I picked all the tops. I dried the basil for about 4 weeks then ground it in the food processor and filled an large empty Quaker Oat container with ground basil.

I have been wondering how to use all this basil. These cold winter days I have been making some great tomato basil soup. I can of Campbells Tomato soup, 1 tablespoon dried ground basil, 1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper, salt and pepper to taste.

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Sage Hermit
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:)))))))))))))))))) m m good.

Thank you for your info on the pinching method.
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rainbowgardener
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Being in cold weather climate, in the fall I pull all my basil plants and collect all the basil. Turn a lot of the fresh basil into pesto (here's one recipe, but I would leave the parsley out and use all basil: https://allrecipes.com/Recipe/The-Best-Pesto-Ever/Detail.aspx )

It uses up tons of fresh basil. I freeze the pesto in baggies. Then in the winter I just have to pull a pesto bag out, defrost in warm water and instant yummy dinner! Then I only dry a couple spice jars full for use in the winter.

But I think the pesto has to be made with fresh leaves.

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applestar
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What do you mean can of Cambell's Tomato Soup!!! What happened to all your canned tomatoes, Gary350?! :shock:

Just kidding :wink: Sounds really yummy, especially with this cold winter with tons of snow.

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Sage Hermit
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Tomato soup from Campbells is so rich. I did something to it too once last fall but I forgot what I did. prolly what I had on hand. garlic or something and peper.

So much ground Up Basil. I'd definately save a a few ounces of it on shaker jars. You have to experiment with your own taste buds :) Wish I could help you with that btw.
You can solve all your problems in a garden/laboratory.

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Gary350
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applestar wrote:What do you mean can of Cambell's Tomato Soup!!! What happened to all your canned tomatoes, Gary350?! :shock:

Just kidding :wink: Sounds really yummy, especially with this cold winter with tons of snow.
I don't know how to make GOOD homemade tomato soup so I cheat and use Campbells soup in a can. I have tried many recipes but only end up wasting a lot of good tomatoes. I eat it anyway but I don't make that recipe again.

I use most of those canned tomatoes for soup, chili, TX Mex, Vegatable.

My grandmother use to make maccroni and tomatoes, wow that is good. I don't know anyone else that makes this and the recipe is not is any book. Put a pint of garden tomatoes in a pan bring it to a boil add some honey or sugar then pour in the maccroni and cook until the macconi is tender then serve. Very simple. Add some herbs if you like.

RosieRenee
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Last year I picked my last few basil "crops", chopped them up (not fine, but still coarse), added just enough olive oil to coat them all, stirred them up, froze them on cookie sheets and then put in zip lock bags for freezing. They still have their color (I think the olive oil prevents them from going brown) and they taste great. I use them just like I do fresh basil. Yum in February!
Rosie Renee

bigdoug
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I'm totally with you on the pesto, rainbowgardener. I just can't get enough. I use it on everything. I try to tell other people about pesto and they look at me like I'm an alien. Then I tell them what's in it and they really look at me like I'm an alien. But I just love it.

emerald7
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Pesto!

rainbowgardener wrote:Being in cold weather climate, in the fall I pull all my basil plants and collect all the basil. Turn a lot of the fresh basil into pesto.
Yep, pesto uses huge amounts of basil. (I am hoping 4 basil plants will be enough for me to make some pesto.)

A recipe I like:
• 2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
• 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan-Reggiano or Romano cheese
• 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
• 1/3 cup pine nuts or walnuts
• 3 medium-sized garlic cloves, minced
• Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
• Special equipment needed: A food processor

1 Combine the basil in with the pine nuts, pulse a few times in a food processor. (If you are using walnuts instead of pine nuts and they are not already chopped, pulse them a few times first, before adding the basil.) Add the garlic, pulse a few times more.
2 Slowly add the olive oil in a constant stream while the food processor is on. Stop to scrape down the sides of the food processor with a rubber spatula. Add the grated cheese and pulse again until blended. Add a pinch of salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.
Makes 1 cup.
Serve with pasta or spread over toasted baguette slices. Also tasty on raw tomatoes.
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