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meganO
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Location: Kansas City MO

My patio herbs are losing my interest

As a first time gardener, maybe I need to learn patience as a virtue, especially when watching one's garden grow. :wink:

The rate at which my dill, chives, and oregano first sprouted, (about the 3rd week of May, within a week of starting the seeds).. I thought by mid summer I'd be bragging and sharing my homemade eats made with my own herbs from my patio!

Alas, the oregano i gave up on when it finally was blown off my balcony during a storm :roll: and the dill and chives, though they've continued to grow out and upward, still look puny and spindly to me.

How do I tell when I can use them, or might they be needing something more from me?? Thanks a bunch for any ideas!

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Gary350
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Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

I grow herbs but not every years. I grew some a few years ago. This year I have several. To me Chives seems like such a waste of time and effort for a bunch of very tiny onions like plants. Cut them off with sizzers and you barely get 1 meal. Oregano is extremely slow growing, I know mine has surely grown a little but it is hard to tell. I usually don't grow anything I don't eat but I grow dill because the butterflies like it and I love watching the butterflies. Dill grows like a weed, it comes back every year. Once you have dill you have to make a special effort to kill it. Basil grows the fastest and it will keep you busy picking off the tops that try to go to seed. I don't care much for eating basil but you pick a bunch and bring it into the house and in 30 minutes the whole house smells like basil. I don't eat sage either but it sure does smell good in the house, I would rather have western sage smell in the house than basil. If you want something that grows fast, plant mint. I planted mint 10 years ago and I have been trying to kill it but it keeps coming back. Mow the mint down with the lawn mower and you can smell it for 3 city blocks. Hysops is the BEST of all my herbs, wow it makes the best tea I every had and it grows pretty fast too. Next year I think I will grow only Hysops, about 30 plants. You have to find a reason why you want to grow herbs to stay interested in the hobby.
Last edited by Gary350 on Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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rainbowgardener
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herbs

I don't know how your weather has been, but if it's like ours, i.e. lots of rain and very little sun, that's exactly the opposite of what herbs want. So it hasn't been a great season for them (but wonderful for things that like lots of water!)

Herbs usually you can just pick and use when you need them, just don't over pick the plant so that you set it back too much. Try the oregano again next year... once it gets established it grows and grows and it is perennial comes back year after year. It can take over a bed if you don't cut it back enough (as will mints). Either one is great for containers.

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gixxerific
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Like rainbowgardener said be careful where you plant certain herbs, as they are basically tasty weeds that won't go away.

I remember a certain lemon basil I brought home on a plane from my cousin's in Ohio. I put it in my garden and it would come back every year even bigger, even after tilling it in several years and cutting it off at the base and trying to pull it out and other things as well.

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meganO
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Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2009 11:18 pm
Location: Kansas City MO

Thanks for the interest

I appreciate the responses! Again, I'm a first time gardener, so these are inexpensive attempts for now.
As gary360 (?) suggested, the chives (which I could use for a variety of purposes) seem a bit silly, in that so far there is so little produced, they really don't end up very useful. I happen to really like dill, in things such as tuna salad, potato salad, even chicken dishes, but what I have at this point seems puny and not very flavorful. I think what I've learned at this point is that I must start earlier next time, for sure.
It's ironic to me that my rosemary plant, of course, is so full and sturdy, for an herb that takes so little to flavor anything!

Thanks once again for taking time to read and reply to my posts!

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