JoAngel32
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First Herb Garden

I planted my very first herb garden about a month or so ago, and my question is....do herbs do better indoors or outdoors? I currently have them on our back deck in pots, and they get pretty much full sun all day. My cilantro seems to be turning yellow, and I'm wondering if it's because it's too hot out there for them. The thyme and basil are looking good, but the lavender, oregano, parsely, and mint are either tiny or haven't come up at all. Should I bring them inside? I don't have any windows that get alot of sun, plus I have 2 cats and 2 dogs that would probably eat them. :-( What do I do?? Oh, and we're renting our house so I don't really want to plant them in the ground.

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Kisal
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Cilantro does tend to bolt when warm weather arrives. I've never been able to grow it through the summer. I don't have a light garden yet, so I haven't tried growing it indoors.

I don't know what to tell you about the problems you're having with the other plants.

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rainbowgardener
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herb garden

Most herbs either need or definitely prefer full sun. Definitely better outside. Some herbs do well in containers, which might be a good solution for you. Oregano, mint, parsley, basil are all examples of plants that are easy to grow in containers. Oregano and mint are best grown that way, because they are pretty aggressive spreaders and can take over a bed they are planted in. Lavender unfortunately, while it can be grown in containers (and I have some that way) doesn't thrive as well as in the ground.

The lavender is slow to sprout and slow to grow. By the end of the season you will just have a little plant a few inches tall. But it is perennial. Give it a lot of protection to get through the winter (it can be sensitive and things in pots freeze a lot easier than in the ground) and next year you will have a nice bushy plant over a foot tall. (Ohio gardening-- I forgot to look where you are). The other things are a lot quicker. If they didn't come up you may need to start over.

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applestar
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I've never tried growing mint from seed. If you can find some fresh and perky mint at the grocery store, it's pretty easy to get them to root in water or in a pot of moist soil with a humidity dome made of a soda bottle with the bottom cut off. Leave the cap off and keep out of direct sunlight until new growth starts (North or East window).

I've heard that you can do the same with oregano but haven't tried. Oregano will prefer less humidity and well draining soil. I HAVE rooted cuttings of thyme from my own plants in 1/2 sand 1/2 potting soil, but you said your thyme is doing well. I grew some thyme from seeds this year too and was surprised how easy that was. Tough plants. Parsley is slow to start but takes off once the roots are established -- give it a decent sized pot. If you let basil get pot-bound, it's liable to bolt and go to flower, which changes the flavor.

cynthia_h
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My experience with both mint and lavender is that they grow much better from cuttings than from seed.

If you take a cutting in (for example) April, that cutting will have seven or so months to grow and develop a root system. But if you plant a seed of a perennial in April, the root system will have much less time to develop. This is the underlying reason that most sources recommend cuttings.

If you don't know anyone with mint or lavender plants, purchasing starts works well, too.

The annuals--basil, parsley, and cilantro--should grow from seed but, as you discovered, cilantro doesn't like full heat/sun when it's living in a container.

Your first question was, Do herbs do better indoors or outdoors? => They need lots of light, so outdoors is the way to go. My own basil, mint, oregano, thyme, parsley, etc. are in containers. My lavender is in the ground (I'm fortunate in my climate zone). I don't grow cilantro, because DH hates it. :(

What kind of soil are the herbs in? And what size are their containers? Maybe we can work something out for you from that angle. And does your back deck face south or some other direction?

Best wishes...

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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supagirl277
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Location: Utah Hardiness Zone: 6b

cynthia_h wrote:My experience with both mint and lavender is that they grow much better from cuttings than from seed.

If you take a cutting in (for example) April, that cutting will have seven or so months to grow and develop a root system. But if you plant a seed of a perennial in April, the root system will have much less time to develop. This is the underlying reason that most sources recommend cuttings.

If you don't know anyone with mint or lavender plants, purchasing starts works well, too.

The annuals--basil, parsley, and cilantro--should grow from seed but, as you discovered, cilantro doesn't like full heat/sun when it's living in a container.

Your first question was, Do herbs do better indoors or outdoors? => They need lots of light, so outdoors is the way to go. My own basil, mint, oregano, thyme, parsley, etc. are in containers. My lavender is in the ground (I'm fortunate in my climate zone). I don't grow cilantro, because DH hates it. :(

What kind of soil are the herbs in? And what size are their containers? Maybe we can work something out for you from that angle. And does your back deck face south or some other direction?

Best wishes...

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9
My deck goes out southward and I'm planning on potting some herbs too. Would that be a good place for them while they are starting out? It isn't too warm here yet.

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