merylmz
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Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:37 pm
Location: Washington, DC

Seeking Recommendations: Organic Herb Seed Collections

hi!

I am looking for info on a good place online to purchase organic herb seeds, in a collection or sampler. This seems like it would be a lot cheaper than buying individual packets of seeds, especially since I am just looking for the basics. Basil, parsley, oregano, dill, mint, lemon balm, etc.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

thanks

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I just recently came across Southern Exposure Seed Exchange and ordered some seeds. I thought I might mention it since they're located in VA. I've no other experience with them, but they have an informative website and have many organic seeds. Don't know if they have "collections" either, but here's their page with a list of retail stores that presumably carry their seeds.
https://www.southernexposure.com/stores.p.html

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JustPeachy
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Location: Eastern NC

Seeds of Change is a good site as well....

https://www.seedsofchange.com/garden_center/browse_category.asp?category_id=104

I have used these seeds with great results.

~Emily
;)

cynthia_h
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Location: El Cerrito, CA

Take a look at www.horizonherbs.com for a good, long list of traditional medicinal and culinary herbs.

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

The Helpful Gardener
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[url]https://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/category.aspx?category=205[/url]

Always liked Johnny's although I'm not sure about the herbs all being organic. I do know they do a lot of organic seeds, just not sure about the herbs, so check. But wonderful company, Rob's a lovely man and doing good work...

I wonder, if you take a non-organic seed, and raise the plant organically, then is the resultant plant and fruit organic? To me the small part of germ plasm that was the seed has been well diluted in the mix and the higher nutrient densities from the organic sourcing would be present...of course we know that our organic seed sourcing has stepped lightly on the planet and isn't that part of the reason for organics in the first place? And how can one be sure? Seed saving seems the best tack...

HG
Scott Reil

cynthia_h
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I have *no earthly idea* whether the germ plasm is affected.

But I want to support as much organic horti/agriculture as I can, so I buy organic seeds when available and not TOO much more than conventional seeds.

Seed saving is also good, but where potatoes, carrots, and the like are concerned, I'm really not that into it. OTOH, I have absolute boatloads of rapini, komatsuna, lettuce (can't remember ATM the variety, but it was Seed Savers Exchange), and bok choy seeds.

2009 has been so physically difficult for me that we'll probably have to use plant starts all the way around for our first planting, and then seeds for the later plantings.

We still have a lot of seed from last year, due to our very small cultivated area (96 sq. ft.).

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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I don't start a lot from seed myself cynthia; some tomatoes and some peppers. Get a lot of starts from friends (a whole package of seed is more than most people can use and second year seed is hit or miss). And I like to support my local green industry, especially the ones getting it right, so I buy from people I trust, local growers who's hands I actually shake. Not everybody is going to go deep into seed starting, especially when they are starting out, and these are the businesses that support beginners and casual hobbyists, the mass of our fellow gardeners. Plus they are the backstop for that flat of starts that damped off, or a new variety you want to try first.

Plus you can do some good purchasing; I buy a lot of my herbs from a program called Sara's Superb Herbs; a local wholesale grower raises big chunky herbs in one gallon containers and donates a portion of each sale directly to Camp Hemlocks, the local Easter Seal camp for disabled kids. I get a great plant I won't have to worry about (it's grown up already) and I feel good about my purchase. They have great selections and are pesticide free and I know I'm supporting two local businesses (wholesale and retail) and a charity...

HG
Scott Reil

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