TheLorax
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Just for fun-

I love this plant.

Can anyone guess what I have?

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2522146950103590453pjiFNm][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/69/469/1/46/95/2522146950103590453pjiFNm_th.jpg[/img][/url]

Newjerseytea? NEWisc? ahughes?
Last edited by TheLorax on Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.

NewjerseyTea
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Must be a very interesting site you sent me to Lorax because it pops up with large letters FORBIDDEN.

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JennyC
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When I click on it, it says I'm not authorized to view the page. Now, that only makes guessing a little bit harder for me, since I can't ID much of anything, but I bet it'll make things much harder for our resident experts :D
Jenny C

TheLorax
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Oh I get so mad that I can't insert photos into threads!

Let's try this-
https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2522146950103590453pjiFNm

If that doesn't work, you may have to cut and paste the links into IE.

Andy JennyC, it's a native plant to where all three of us garden so you might know exactly what it is!

Hint, it's a threatened and endangered species.

Editing to add I was just taught how to insert a photo from a site my computer lets me use! Image that you can click on is now in the first post!

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NEWisc
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OK, now this is just a wild guess, but does it have anything to do with the caption above the photo?! :lol:
.
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I will age, but I refuse to get old.

TheLorax
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It is Arisaema draconitium (Green Dragon).

Fun police!
Fun police!
Fun police!

Hey, at least I finally found a website that could host photos for me that I wasn't blocked from accessing! And, I did finally figure out how to get that photo in a thread... thanks to a benevolent soul. So I missed a minor detail, like leaving the whole binomial in the caption... oops!

Yes, it is indeed Arisaema draconitium (Green Dragon).

Next time I go outside I'm going to take a few photos of fun (and maybe not so fun) plants. I'll leave out the binomial from the captions this time (slaps self up side of head)!

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NEWisc
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Here's one from the other end of the habitat spectrum - full sun, dry sandy soil. It's rarely seen offered by nurseries because it is very difficult to propagate, and it doesn't like to be transplanted. Another hint: the seed is a nutlet.

.[img]https://www.thegardengalleries.org/d/6014-2/Lithospermum_1.jpg[/img]

Although rare in the plant trade, it's not that uncommon in it's natural dry sandy habitat.
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.

TheLorax
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Ewwwwwwwwww, that's a real hard one. Not too many people get a chance to walk a dune system or sand prairie.

A Lithospermum? Is this croceum (L. caroliniense)? How about canescens? If it is, I think Swink and Wilhelm have this down as a 10. Occurs at the Illinois Beach State Park.

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NEWisc
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Ding! Ding! ding! We have a winner!! :D Lithospermun canescens (Hoary Puccoon) it is. It's a great little plant that I always enjoy seeing in it's dry sandy habitat. Some other plants that I often see with this plant are Asclepias tuberosa (ButterflyMilkweed), Campanula rotundifolia (Harebells) and some of the native Liatris spp.
.
Age is a biological fact.
Old is a state of mind.
I will age, but I refuse to get old.

TheLorax
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A garden foe

Sort of a winner. Read my post again. My first guess was L. croceum.

I'm getting the hang of posting photos everybody.

Here goes for anyone interested in trying to ID a few plants. I went outside and took a few photos. Although I didn't screw up and add captions, I did screw up when I photographed this invasive species right after I had ripped it out of the ground. Hint for this one is that it is foe not friend. And this plant has naturalized in quite a few regions.

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2962764050103590453puncqm][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/69/469/7/64/5/2962764050103590453puncqm_th.jpg[/img][/url]

The below is a horrible image but it does five people an idea of the leaf margins.

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2930966710103590453EwacuP][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/66/666/9/66/71/2930966710103590453EwacuP_th.jpg[/img][/url]

If anyone needs better close up photos, I can go out and try to get them tomorrow. I'm sure that thing will still be alive in the middle of the driveway.

TheLorax
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Plant #4

I bought 3 plants of this species to try out somewhere around four years ago. As of today, it has reproduced and I count a total of seven plants out there.

Hint- it is a woodland species and has finished blooming and will begin to die back until next year.

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2107270760103590453VUxRar][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/69/469/2/70/76/2107270760103590453VUxRar_th.jpg[/img][/url]

TheLorax
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Plant #5

Not the greatest photo but I can try to take a better photo tomorrow.

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2041483930103590453ocVCMM][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/66/666/4/83/93/2041483930103590453ocVCMM_th.jpg[/img][/url]

TheLorax
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Plant #6

Could be a fun plant but maybe it's not so fun of a plant. You decide-

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2650930760103590453fXaFzC][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/66/666/9/30/76/2650930760103590453fXaFzC_th.jpg[/img][/url]

Another view of the same species-

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2295302390103590453kRipap][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/66/666/3/2/39/2295302390103590453kRipap_th.jpg[/img][/url]

TheLorax
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Plant #7

This is a hard one. Hint, it's a vine. That should narrow down the search considerably.

[url=https://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2916028870103590453jLWlfS][img]https://thumb13.webshots.net/t/69/469/0/28/87/2916028870103590453jLWlfS_th.jpg[/img][/url]

editing to add that if you click on my little photos they enlarge. Just discovered that! How cool is this!

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JennyC
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You have all the nice plants. Pretty little vine that might grow up a tree; I can't ID that. Now, give me a shot of poison oak growing 50 feet up, I'm your girl.

In other words, I don't know, though I have seen the vine and the 5-branching-leaves thing.

And I've figured out who I can get to teach me the natives: my friend the herbalist (duh)! If she has time...
Jenny C

TheLorax
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Here JennyC-
https://www.gnps.org/
Consider starting there. There may be a chapter close to you. The really neat thing about native plant people is that they share all those "nice" plants and in the fall they normally have a seed swap which is a phenomenal way to get a jump start on adding some natives to your landscape. Native plant societies normally meet once a month for a few hours. They frequently have some sort of a guest speaker and take-home easy read materials are generally available. It's a nice way to get your feet wet.

Also check these sites for information on native plants for you-
https://www.gabotsoc.org/
https://www.uga.edu/gpca/
https://georgiawildlife.dnr.state.ga.us/content/specialconcernplants.asp
https://www.serpin.org/index1.html

Plug your State in here and watch what comes up-
https://www.centerforplantconservation.org/ASP/CPC_NCList_Find.asp

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JennyC
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Hey, thanks for the Georgia Botanical Society! I didn't know about them. And they have a fern workshop Saturday which I wish I could go to, but I'm already registered for a sustainability workshop (rainwater gatehring, earth sheltered homes, and composting tiolets!). Besides, the fern thing is over a hundred miles off. I'll keep an eye out for something in the northwest part of the state, though.

I wish the native plant society was closer, but they're in Atlanta (which adds hours to a trip with the traffic). I don't think the Georgia group has branches.

I should look for groups in Chattanooga or northeast AL, too -- not far from here.

Going through the rest of your links now. Thanks again!
Jenny C

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JennyC
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Found something for you on the endangered plant list. You were asking in another topic about spicebush, and here's an endangered one:

Lindera melissifolia
Jenny C

TheLorax
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You know, I go out of state to go to my native plant group. It's about 10 miles across the border to their meetings. The native plant chapter meetings in my state are considerably farther away. If Chattanooga and Northeast Alabama are closer to you, chances are actually better you'll be able to work with more locally native plants than if you joined a native plant society in your state. Most native plant people are very familiar with the importance of locally native species so they'll take in anyone who is in their local area even if that gardener is across a state border. We people may respect borders but plants and animals certainly don't so I think joining any native plant chapter available in either of those areas you mentioned is ideal.

The Spicebush you mentioned isn't one I'm familiar with. It's not native to where I garden but appears to be native to where you garden. Great looking plant that probably isn't going to be able to be found for sale. That's the exact type of species that makes being a member of a native plant group worth while as it's via the other members that you would probably be able to add that to your home landscape. In fact, this is exactly how many gardeners bulk their own properties with natives.
https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LIME7

In that other thread I was actually asking about what a Spicy Bush was. First thing that came to mind for me was the Lindera benzoin (Spicebush) which didn't make sense in the context in which she had posted. The Spicy Bush she was referring to was a basil.

ahughes798
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Lorax...pictures one and two are Vinca minor and Euonymus, respectively.

ahughes798
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Picture 3 is cut-leaf toothwort, cardamine concatenata.

ahughes798
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The vine is a wild Yam of some sort.

TheLorax
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The images in the post dated Sun Jun 08, 2008 7:02 pm are actually both the same plant. The images aren’t the greatest because you can’t really see that the leaf margins aren’t entire in the first image but you picked up on that in the second image and nailed it. I believe both of those images are Euonymus fortunei var. radicans.

The image in the “Post subject: Plant #4â€

ahughes798
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I would swear plant one is vinca minor

And plant two is euonymus fortunei. I.E, I think these are two different plants, but it could be the photos, as you said.

The crinkleroot is a plant I know as toothwort, LOL! April

TheLorax
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Had to take a second look at both of the photos in that one post and it does look an awful lot like Vinca but I hand pulled that and one photo was more of the whole plant and the other was a close up. I did have the benefit of having the plant in my hand when I laid it out on the driveway to take photos. One thing they both have in common is that they're both invasive. They are both opposite leaved plants and that prominent vein appears on both. If the photo in the first image had been better, you would have been able to see the leaf margins.

The plant I think of when I hear Toothwort is Cardamine maxima. I don't have that but I'd like to.

editing to add, very appreciative of the plants you shared with me. I have a used Dirr's Manual set aside for you. It's seen better days and is well worn complete with a worn binding, dog eared pages, and some hi-lighting but there are no pages missing.

praying mantis
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I just now joined my local native plant society. I have nothing to do, yet, but I am kinda excited.
thanks, lorax.

TheLorax
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Oh yay for you!

Start small. Please don't go bonkers and start wasting plants just because they're not native. I've seen more than my fair share of people do that once they catch the bug and I always scratch my head because there are so many mild mannered non-natives out there.

I'm really excited for you. I remember when I went to my first native plant society meeting. Met a lot of really fun people the very first night. Some of whom are still local and gardening even more with natives. They truly are beautiful in their own right and we all grow together as gardeners when we get together.

The one book you might want to pick up from the library would be-
https://www.amazon.com/Bringing-Nature-Home-Sustain-Wildlife/dp/0881928542
It's an easy but thoroughly enjoyable read.

raptor
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#5 Smilax illinoensis

TheLorax
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Correct.

I should probably go out and take some updated photos of #6. Current photos might help.

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