orgoveg
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Posts: 468
Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: Ohio

evening primrose help

I collected seeds from the plant in the first photo, which I believed I had identified as evening primrose. I understood the evening primrose to be a biennial plant which formed a basal rosette in the first year (second photo) and produced a stalk the second year with flowers. The third and fourth photos show what I have growing from the seeds. The plants do resemble the original plant in the first photo, but if they are, indeed evening primrose, they seemed to have skipped the basal rosette stage.

Can anyone clear any of the confusion up? Maybe I have mis-identified or there are different species of evening primrose.

[img]https://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh194/abaction/wildprimroserszd.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh194/abaction/basalroserszd.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh194/abaction/primrose1rszd.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh194/abaction/primrose2rszd.jpg[/img]

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applestar
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Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Yeah. The second photo is the only one that I recognize as Evening Primrose.... :|

BTW, another way to ID Evening Primrose at this time of the year, especially 2nd year stalks, is that the Japanese Beetles will be all over them. :x

orgoveg
Green Thumb
Posts: 468
Joined: Sat Jun 06, 2009 5:06 pm
Location: Ohio

Okay, I did some research and much more is needed. It looks like the common evening primrose we know is oenothera biennis. The genus oenothera has about 125 species within it and all are referred to as "evening primrose" of one kind or another. It will take me some time to identify this one, if I can ID it at all. I really think it is one of them in that genus.

I just went back to a place where I had found the right basal rosettes before and they seem to have been crowded out by poison ivy. :x

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