Jacey
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Container growing Globe Artichoke?

Have tried this in the ground, but didn't like the heat, would like to have a whiskey barrel grown globe artichoke if possible so I can move it if I have to. I planted one yesterday in some really high quality potting soil, Vortex, and it was already in a 2 gal pot. Will this work does anyone know?

native
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Wish I knew , mine failed, would love to grow them.

opabinia51
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I'm thinking that it should work. A lady that was a member or my organic gardening club moved her artichoke up from California and it survived the 3000 Km trip so, I would think that moving your plant to a pot would be good.

Just watch the soil, don't keep it to wet or to dry. And use quality organic fertilizer. Artichokes are thistles so, you don't need to give it to much care. They are lovely though and very good for you.

Good luck!

Jacey
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opabinia51 wrote:I'm thinking that it should work. A lady that was a member or my organic gardening club moved her artichoke up from California and it survived the 3000 Km trip so, I would think that moving your plant to a pot would be good.

Just watch the soil, don't keep it to wet or to dry. And use quality organic fertilizer. Artichokes are thistles so, you don't need to give it to much care. They are lovely though and very good for you.

Good luck!
I am just concerned that they have enough root zone for the pot I put it in, which is a whiskey barrel. I know they can get 5 feet or better, will that be an adequate size for the plant to produce in? I have mentioned the potting soil I am using is the best I know of, but I have heard they are heavy feeders, so the thistle thing doesn't seem to totally apply here. I wonder what the recommended rates of fert would be. Does anyone here have hands on knowledge of successful production of this plant grown in a whiskey barrel sized container?

opabinia51
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Well, I had mine in some extremely rocky soil last year and it did really well and the roots barely penetrated. I don't know what size your barrel is but, if you have a large enough barrel it should do fine.

Anyone else have experience growing artichokes in barrels?

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Jess
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Not in barrels but I moved mine in the garden. They were still quite young but even so had very long taproots. The taproot can grow to 2metres in length but whether this would happen in a barrel I can't say.

There are different cultivars that might be better suited to growing in containers. 'Plein Blanc Inerme' is smaller so one would presume the main root would be shorter.
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Jacey
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Jess wrote:Not in barrels but I moved mine in the garden. They were still quite young but even so had very long taproots. The taproot can grow to 2metres in length but whether this would happen in a barrel I can't say.

There are different cultivars that might be better suited to growing in containers. 'Plein Blanc Inerme' is smaller so one would presume the main root would be shorter.
Have you ever seen a bonsai? Have you ever seen an oak tree growing out of a crevice..I am more interested in how heavy a feeder they are. Huge trees are grown in containers to a point..it's all in the experience..and I am looking for someone who has this experience. Maybe it will be me next time someone is looking. Thank you for you input..

anon
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Hi, hope this is timely enough to be of help: I am trying to do the same a ran across a book about self-watering containers--can't recall the name. Anyway, the authors said a 30L pot should do the trick (about 1 cu ft of soil I think). He said 30L is enough to get production while smaller tends to dwarf them some. 40L is a bit of a bigger producer, but he claimed the size of the pot at this point helps little. Hope this helps.

Jacey
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anon wrote:Hi, hope this is timely enough to be of help: I am trying to do the same a ran across a book about self-watering containers--can't recall the name. Anyway, the authors said a 30L pot should do the trick (about 1 cu ft of soil I think). He said 30L is enough to get production while smaller tends to dwarf them some. 40L is a bit of a bigger producer, but he claimed the size of the pot at this point helps little. Hope this helps.
Well...my main question remains unanswered..how heavy a feeder is it? I decided to let the first bud go to bloom...just to see what it would look like..the secondary bud started and then turned dark and fell off..not sure how long their season to produce is, but at least it hasn't completely withered in the whiskey barrel..in full morning sun at 101 degrees here in Texas. More of a novelty than a real vegetable crop, from the looks of it.

anon
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From what I gather, they are heavy feeders---high nitrogen fert. about once a month. Rich, well draining soil. To the dry artich. it may be to hot for them---they grow in cooler foggy weather so partial shade out there is probably a good idea. More important, I believe, is root temperature---need to add mulch to keep the roots cool. Need fair amount of water to keep moist otherwise the artich. will become stringy and dry, and well draining soil should help from drowing the roots. After the spring harvest you can cut the plant back and will bloom again. Hope this helps some.

Jacey
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anon wrote:From what I gather, they are heavy feeders---high nitrogen fert. about once a month. Rich, well draining soil. To the dry artich. it may be to hot for them---they grow in cooler foggy weather so partial shade out there is probably a good idea. More important, I believe, is root temperature---need to add mulch to keep the roots cool. Need fair amount of water to keep moist otherwise the artich. will become stringy and dry, and well draining soil should help from drowing the roots. After the spring harvest you can cut the plant back and will bloom again. Hope this helps some.
Thanx..so do you just cut the spent flower, or go back to the base of the stalk? It really was a beautiful color of blue..I think I'd enjoy looking at the flower longer than I'd enjoy eating one measly choke that probably wasn't as happy as if it was growin in the fog somewhere. I'll try the mulch..good tip!

anon
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To cut the artic. you typically cut a few inches of the stock with it---should get multiple flowers per stock. After it stops fruiting in summer you can cut the plant way back and it will come back again. The roots are shallow and I recall if the soil gets much over 85F it can stunt the plant some---the mulch cools them and keeps in the moisture.

SusanHof
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Container Artichokes

Since this is my first trial with container chokes it will be an experiment. I have a large wine barrel and a cutting I got from Providence Farm here in BC. We live on a floathome so everyhing grown is RIGHT close to salt water. Does salt water air hurt the growing process?

wolfie
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Hey There,

Any updates on these artichokes? I am in Virginia, would love to grow them as they are my fave, but I always thought they grew in Monterey Calif because of that climate, which where I am is no where near it lol

Let's get some updates on the containers, I'm getting excited!
Shan -
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Jacey
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As for mine..it had one awesome blue flower, since it didn't set more and we have had the hottest summer on record for this time of year, I remained content. In VA you may have better luck...not so Texas! It is still alive, with silvery bottom leaves..but not happy as if in the fog in California..of course California seems to be mostly on fire right now! I'm stickin to pomegranites and passionvine..they love it here!!

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