hlouie
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:51 pm

Mushrooms in my indoor pots

I have several medium to large size container plants in my bay window in Brooklyn, NY. About 6 weeks ago, I discovered a bright yellow mushroom growing from the soil of one kalanchoe plant. The cap of the mushroom was 1.5 to 2 inches in diameter with lots of spores on top and a bright yellow stalk. There was a greyish powder over the soil around where the mushroom was growing (I supposed more spores?). My husband took the pot outside and dug out the mushroom as well as all the soil that we saw the grey powder on.
After a few days, 3 more mushrooms grew in the pot. We finally gave up and just left the plant in the corner of the backyard. The day we took it outside, the mushrooms wilted in the bright hot sun. About 10 days later, when I checked on the plant again, I saw 3 mushrooms growing there again.
Just yesterday, I saw a mushroom growing in the soil of the giant aloe pot that I have in the bay window next to where the kalanchoe was. I only water these plants about once a week but it does get very hot in the summer in the window since we have the vertical blinds mostly closed during the day when we are at work. Help! What are these things? How can I get rid of them without losing all my plants? I would appreciate any help you can offer me. Thanks.

femlow
Senior Member
Posts: 127
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2006 1:37 am
Location: 5a - Maine

I'm not sure what kind you have, there are quite a few yellow varieties, but I've never heard of mushroms killing houseplants. I suppose it could happen? But it seems unlikely. Mushrooms are also very difficult to get rid of. If you can find out what species they are in particular (maybe post a picture if you can?), then you might be able to find a poison specifically for that species, but I'm not sure what affect that would have on your plants or if you really want it in your house. Personally, I'd suggest telling people you are growing them on purpose, and maybe try them in a nice vegetable soup. Keep the population down atleast...

grandpasrose
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1651
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:21 pm
Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

Hi Hlouie! Welcome to the Forum!
Mushrooms are a type of fungus, and are spread by spores. Those spores may have been in your soil all along, and conditions have just gotten right for them to grow, or they blew in an open window, came in with something else, etc.
There are a couple of ways you can go about eliminating this. The first way is to remove all sign of the mushrooms and spores (even the tiniest speck) from the soil. Depending on how big the pot is, you may want to just remove the top couple of inches of soil, and replace it with new STERILE soil. One thing that mushrooms and fungus need is dampness. Make sure that your plants are not sitting with damp soil for long, and let the surface of the soil dry out before watering again. They probably loved sitting in your nicely shaded window as well, as they usually prefer shade.
Once you have removed the soil containing the fungus, etc. and replaced it with new sterile soil, spray the plant and soil with a mixture of 5-10 garlic cloves with a pint of water, blended and strained. You may also add 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and a few drops of liquid dish soap to this mixture and then spray as a preventative. Spray every 2-3 days for a couple of weeks.

The other way you could go about eliminating them may be easier. Remove your plants from their pots, sterilize the pots, and replace the soil with STERILE potting soil. Carefully remove as much of the soil from the plant as possible, even rinsing the roots if you feel brave (kolanchoe and aloe are both very hardy plants). Replant them in the new soil, and spray with the plant and soil with the above mixture as prevention.
I hope this has helped you. The mushrooms will not kill your plants so not to worry. But if you don't like them or they're an eyesore, then by all means get rid of them. All they are going to do is produce more spores and then you know what happens then.....more mushrooms!!
Let us know how it goes, and feel free to stop in any time if you have problems, or just to have a chat! :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

hlouie
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:51 pm

Thanks, femlow and Val for your input. I did not mean to imply that the mushrooms were killing my plants...just that since we don't want mushrooms in the house, we would have to move my indoor plants outside and they will die come winter time.
Val, I would love to follow your garlic concoction but I'm pregnant and don't want to be breathing in spores, esp since the mushrooms are unidentified. Maybe I can get my husband to do it. Do you think they sell fungus pesticide at Home Depot or something? I will let you know what happens. Thanks again.

grandpasrose
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1651
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 4:21 pm
Location: Quesnel, BC, Canada - Zone 4a

You're welcome for the help hlouie, anytime.
Just a note though, if you are concerned about being around things that may harm your baby, a pesticide should be right up there on your list!
I would suggest that you ask your husband nicely if he would mind trying to do what I have advised. It is much more eco-friendly, and baby friendly!
For sure stop in and let us know how it goes, and feel free to stop in anytime you have questions, advice, or just want to chat. :wink:

Val
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Here's info on the yellow houseplant mushroom.
https://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/feb2002.html

Newt

hlouie
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 5:51 pm

Thanks everyone!

Hi Newt, thanks for the information on the identity of the mushrooms. My husband did get a slight rash on his forearm after he removed the mushrooms for me (the gloves only went up to his wrist). We were thinking maybe he came in contact with some spores?

Hi Grandpasrose. I followed your garlic recipe a few weeks ago and have not seen any mushrooms since. We took out the aloe from the pot, scraped off all the soil and sprayed the plant and roots with the mixture. We dumped out all the old soil, washed the pot, sprayed down the pot, refilled with new soil. and planted the aloe back in. Everything's been ok ever since. Thank you so much for your advice! Take care.

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hlouie, I remove them with my bare hands and don't have a problem. Wonder if the rash might have been from one of the plants. Aloe, ivy, Philodendron and more can cause contact dermititis. Here's a list of some common houseplants that can cause problems. Oh, and kalanchoe is toxic if ingested.
https://www.gwenshealinggarden.ca/Article.Poisonous_Plants_Indoors.htm

I searched with the common name of the mushrooms as well as both botanical names for contact dermititis and found nothing, so I suspect it was your aloe or another plant that caused it.

Newt

gardeninggoon
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2006 11:44 am

Ha! Thank goodness. I thought I was the only one with mushrooms in my houseplants! I even looked after a friends recently in my house and that grew mushrooms - so I thought I was doing something wrong! Glad to have found all this info. Thanks peeps. x

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 4659
Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

Well first of all, sorry that I found this thread so late in the game.

But, mushrooms are just the fruiting bodies of soil fungi, so, if you have mushrooms in any soil, it means that you have fungi in your soil. This is almost always a very good thing because the more organisms in your soil, the more resistant the soil is to disease.

This is why compost is so good.

Anyway, not to worry.

Aristotle
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 8:17 am
Location: Canberra, Inland South Eastern Australia

got the same thing

Hi I have the same thing going on. I found this site and discussion after an extensive search on Google, fantastic! I have some photos I would like to upload or email to someone if they can take a look though. I would still like this to be looked at.[/img]

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hi Aristotle,

Welcome to The Helpful Gardener. Sorry you had such a long search to find us, but glad you did! :)

You can't load pictures directly from your computer to this site, but you can post them at a free site and either load them on here, or post a link to here. Photobucket has a free site.

Newt

Aristotle
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 8:17 am
Location: Canberra, Inland South Eastern Australia

Photos (large - 1MB!)

Hi,

Here are some picture files - large - 1MB - as I figure people would appreciate some detail for those with good connections to the Net.

[img]https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1372.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1371.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1370.jpg[/img]

Cheers,

Ian

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Aristotle, they look like some type of fungi, maybe not the particular species mentioned above. The spores usually come with the potting soil. This site has quite a bit of info on fungi.
https://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/feb2002.html

Newt

Aristotle
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 8:17 am
Location: Canberra, Inland South Eastern Australia

could it be harmful or dangerous or unhealthy in any way?

according to this article it is likely to be beneficial!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycorrhiza

Aristotle
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 8:17 am
Location: Canberra, Inland South Eastern Australia

I have uploaded smaller file sizes this time :-) Only 500KB or so.

Soil pictures. I have noticed this white fuzzy stuff in my soil for a long time. It appears it was the mushroom fungus all along?

https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1375.jpg
https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1371-1.jpg
https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1379.jpg
https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1381.jpg
https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1382.jpg

And the plants where I took the pictures from - any general observations are welcome! There is some browning and so on, I presume because it is summer here in Australia that they copped a little harsh sun which they don't any more, but views are welcome.

https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1383.jpg
https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1384.jpg
https://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p30/Aristotlespics/DSCF1385.jpg

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Aristotle, in answer to your general questions about your houseplants, here's the link to my reply for anyone following this.
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=4026&highlight=

In answer to your question about the benefit of the mushrooms, I can't see how it would hurt anything, as long as no one gets hungry and decides to eat them.

As to the white fungus, you could scrape that off. You may be keeping your plants just a bit too moist.

Newt

Aristotle
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 8:17 am
Location: Canberra, Inland South Eastern Australia

That's really weird, I never thought I could be keeping them too moist. Average humidity during the day is around 15%, it has been very hot and dry except for today which is an exception. The potting mix has moisture retaining beads in them which may be keeping it moist.

I imagine I should make more use a moisture meter or only water when the top part of the soil is dry?

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

For most of my plants I water when the top inch or two is dry. You can poke your finger into the soil up to your first or second knuckle. After a while you will know when to water which plants. I do this with my spaths (peace lilies), dracaenas, ficus, etc. You could also do that with your diffenbachia. They don't need to be thoroughly moist all the time. Most container plants suffer from being overwatered. Your maidenhair fern would be the exception as they will grow in the rocks of a waterfall.

Newt

Aristotle
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 8:17 am
Location: Canberra, Inland South Eastern Australia

thanks... so I would be wise to get a indoor water fountain or waterfall or a mister and keep the maiden hair fern near that?

The peace lillies are very thirsty plants - they wilt if they are dry and this is how I know when to water them, it's incredible to watch, as they come back up almost as I watch after watering.

Are moisture meters any help? I have one, and a PH meter (not that I can get it to work).

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Having your maidenhair ferns near a mister or indoor fountain would probably make them very happy.

I tend to water my peace lilies when they wilt too and they seem to thrive and bloom happily.

I've never tried a moisture meter and don't really know much about them. Maybe someone else will come along that uses them. I do the finger to the knuckle trick if it's a new plant for me. If it's a plant I've have for a while I can usually tell by looking at the soil or the plant if it needs water.

Newt

emilyfaithcook
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2008 3:52 am
Location: Chicago

Hi, I too recently found a cluster of yellow mushrooms that I imagine are the same as above. I think they're pretty and from the research I've done there doesn't seem to be anything unhealthy about having them in my home. Does anyone know if I should worry about breathing in the spores? We don't have any children, but do have a cat-- I'm keeping the plant on top of my china cabinet so she can't get to it.

Here are some photos.

https://i324.photobucket.com/albums/k343/emilyfaithcook111/IMG_1476.jpg
https://i324.photobucket.com/albums/k343/emilyfaithcook111/IMG_1475.jpg

Thanks!

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Emily, those are great pics! I don't think it's a good idea to breathe in any type of spores. I get the mushrooms from time to time but I've never had a problem from them.

Newt

clumsykitten
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:53 pm

I know this thread is way old but I've suddenly had a mushroom problem myself!!

Last summer I noticed small round neon green dots in the soil of my jade plant. Worried about what they were, I Google-ed for hours and found no solution. So I re-potted the jade, rinsing off all of the soil from the roots and using completely new soil. Everything seemed fine.

A few weeks ago (a YEAR after re-potting) I noticed the little dots came back! I took it to a garden center and they said that my jade looked completely healthy and the only other thing to do would be to maybe watter it a little more. So I did.

2 days after watering I came home to find 2 HUGE mushrooms growing in the soil!! I freaked out and since I have a cat and didn't know if they were harmful I put the jade out on my porch. The mushrooms withered in the heat and I thought I was done with the problem!

I left my jade outside because he seems to love it out there, but today I went to water and MORE MUSHROOMS are growing!! I live in an apartment now (no yard) so re-potting anything is a big hassle on my tiny porch. I'm going to try the water/garlic/baking soda/dish soap mixture now... but did anyone get those mushrooms back or are they gone for good?

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

Mushroom spores are very small and float around in the air. It's possible they were in the first soil your jade was planted in, before it was ever planted. It's possible the spores were present in the new soil you used. It's possible that more spores drifted onto the soil after you repotted the plant.

Fungi like warm, moist, rich soil. They can be a sign that a container plant is being overwatered. They're easy to remove. If you don't want to touch them, just wear gloves. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Vespa
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:50 pm

Hello everyone!

I'm so glad I found this forum! And I would soo very appreciate for some feedback.

I have a plant in my small sized office and in this plant, just yesterday i realized mushrooms growing in it! It looked like this yesterday:

https://i842.photobucket.com/albums/zz344/8Vespa8/mushroomsclosed.jpg

And then today, to my surprise (I don't know much about plants let alone mushrooms except for them tasting good), it looked like this:

https://i842.photobucket.com/albums/zz344/8Vespa8/mushroomsopened.jpg

I've read many of the comments that was written and got concern once I saw that it was mentioned they can be harmful to once health by breathing it in (again, my office is kinda small, locked-shut window with air conditioner). Should I continue on being scared?

Thank you in advance!!

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

I think you should just reach out with your hand and pick the mushrooms, then toss them in the wastebasket. If it makes you feel better, dispose of them outdoors. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Vespa
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:50 pm

Guess the freak out was for nothing :oops:

Thanx :)

Nightshade
Full Member
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Jul 25, 2010 2:09 am
Location: Seattle, WA

This happens in my plants too. If you look in the pot of the wandering jew I got from a friend, the soil is laced with yellow fungi, and occasionally full fledged yellow mushrooms pop up, only to be shriveled up again by the next day.

I've done some research and as far as I can tell they are not harmful to the plants. Not much you can do to get rid of them, other than discarding the plants, but it is likely that by the time you have noticed it there are already spores in the soil of all your other plants and in your home in general, so this probably won't help and you'll just be dissapointed to find them popping up again by themselves.

mariana
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:09 pm
Location: Florida

Grey Mushroom problem

Hi everyone!

I've also come across this post through an extensive search on Google and I'm so glad!! :)

I have a Songs of India and overnight lots of small grey, not yellow, mushrooms appeared on its soil floor. This is planted in a clay pot by the way. I may have overwatered it a little, automatically every 5 days without checking if the soil is dry. My mistake there. Here's a photo:

[img]https://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y271/gandriollo/IMG00282-20110216-0810.jpg[/img]

I am just concerned about this mushroom. I'm afraid they may contaminate the air and become harmful just breathing the air around. Also, do you think they can spread to other plants in different pots?

Sorry if they are very silly questions. I know little to nothing about house plants!!! :X

Should I follow the same instructions as with the other color mushrooms?

I'll really appreciate some help.

Thank you so much!!!

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

Yes, just pick or pull them and dispose of them. The presence of mushrooms means only that the soil is very rich and moist. If you keep the soil just a little bit drier, it should prevent the growth of mushrooms.

Welcome to the forum! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

mariana
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:09 pm
Location: Florida

Thanks for the reply!

I did that and they haven't appeared since then :)

rosemadder
Newly Registered
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2014 9:58 pm

Re:

grandpasrose wrote:Hi Hlouie! Welcome to the Forum!
Mushrooms are a type of fungus, and are spread by spores. Those spores may have been in your soil all along, and conditions have just gotten right for them to grow, or they blew in an open window, came in with something else, etc.
There are a couple of ways you can go about eliminating this. The first way is to remove all sign of the mushrooms and spores (even the tiniest speck) from the soil. Depending on how big the pot is, you may want to just remove the top couple of inches of soil, and replace it with new STERILE soil. One thing that mushrooms and fungus need is dampness. Make sure that your plants are not sitting with damp soil for long, and let the surface of the soil dry out before watering again. They probably loved sitting in your nicely shaded window as well, as they usually prefer shade.
Once you have removed the soil containing the fungus, etc. and replaced it with new sterile soil, spray the plant and soil with a mixture of 5-10 garlic cloves with a pint of water, blended and strained. You may also add 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda and a few drops of liquid dish soap to this mixture and then spray as a preventative. Spray every 2-3 days for a couple of weeks.

The other way you could go about eliminating them may be easier. Remove your plants from their pots, sterilize the pots, and replace the soil with STERILE potting soil. Carefully remove as much of the soil from the plant as possible, even rinsing the roots if you feel brave (kolanchoe and aloe are both very hardy plants). Replant them in the new soil, and spray with the plant and soil with the above mixture as prevention.
I hope this has helped you. The mushrooms will not kill your plants so not to worry. But if you don't like them or they're an eyesore, then by all means get rid of them. All they are going to do is produce more spores and then you know what happens then.....more mushrooms!!
Let us know how it goes, and feel free to stop in any time if you have problems, or just to have a chat! :wink:

Val

I followed Val's advice today after discovering lots of grey-ish little mushrooms sprouting up in one of our indoor plant pots recently. I removed the mushrooms along with top few inches of soil and replaced it with new potting soil, and sprayed down the soil and plant afterward with the garlic-water spray. We water our plants once a week, so my question for everyone is, would I be spraying the soil and plant every 3 days with the garlic spray AND watering the plant once a week? Or just spray every few days and assess how damp the soil is, to see if it requires additional watering? Thanks everyone :D

Return to “Container Gardening Forum”