newbyplantlover
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syngomium drooping

I bought two syngonium plants from a store and a nursery, respectively. Both of them looked upright and healthy when I bought them. One looked a bit more mature, the other was definitely smaller. Same varietal, different variegation, as far as I can tell. I brought them home and after a bit of time repotted them. Both of them now have outer leaves that are drooping. I have no idea what's causing this. I suspect that the likely culprit has to do with the water level--either too low or too high--but I really don't know. I've tried both thoroughly saturating them and letting them dry out and nothing seems to be affecting the droop. I don't really think it's a disease, but again, I can't tell.

Does anyone have experience with syngonium that can help me identify this problem? Thanks.
Plants are just so happy.

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Kisal
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I would suggest that you check to see if the plants are root bound. Just gently remove the plants from their pots and see what the roots look like. If they're wrapping around the root ball, then it's time to move the plants to the next size larger pot. If the pot is plastic, gently squeeze the sides and tap on the bottom, until the plant slides out. It sounds harder to do than it actually is. :)

When a plant's roots are too tight in the pot, the top growth will look the same as if it isn't getting enough water. That's because the crowded roots can't absorb enough water from the soil. The water will also run right through the pot and out the drainage holes, making you think you've provided plenty of water, but in reality, the soil hasn't actually absorbed much at all. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

newbyplantlover
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Posts: 85
Joined: Fri Apr 17, 2009 9:11 pm
Location: LA area

Kisal wrote:I would suggest that you check to see if the plants are root bound. Just gently remove the plants from their pots and see what the roots look like. If they're wrapping around the root ball, then it's time to move the plants to the next size larger pot. If the pot is plastic, gently squeeze the sides and tap on the bottom, until the plant slides out. It sounds harder to do than it actually is. :)

When a plant's roots are too tight in the pot, the top growth will look the same as if it isn't getting enough water. That's because the crowded roots can't absorb enough water from the soil. The water will also run right through the pot and out the drainage holes, making you think you've provided plenty of water, but in reality, the soil hasn't actually absorbed much at all. :)
Thanks, Kisal, but that couldn't possibly be it. I repotted the plants, and just after repotting they started to droop. Any other options?
Plants are just so happy.

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Kisal
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Location: Oregon

It's difficult to know without seeing a picture. Could you post one? Syngonium, as a rule, aren't subject to a lot of pests, but are sometimes infested with spider mites or mealy bugs.

Arrowhead vine, the common name for Syngonium podophyllum, isn't a particularly demanding plant. It is a vine, and as it matures, needs some support. They like bright light, but will do well in low light situations, as well. Some varieties seem able to do well with less light than others, but none of them likes direct sun.

They need high humidity, so you can either mist the plant several times a day, or place it on a humidity tray. (Another option is to place the plant in the bathroom, where it can enjoy the humidity while family members shower.)

They require a pot with good drainage, and any good potting mix should work fine. Water when the surface of the soil is dry down to about a half-inch deep. In the winter, they prefer to be even a bit drier. Don't allow the pot to stand in water. These plant tend to be subject to root rot, so it's very important not to overwater them. If you repotted into too large a pot, the excess soil around the roots could cause the roots to stay too wet, leading to root rot. Root rot produces all the same symptoms as underwatering, i.e. droopiness, wilting, drying tips on the leaves, etc., because there aren't enough healthy roots to absorb sufficient moisture to support the top growth.

They like to be fed regularly. I use a liquid plant food, mixed to half-strength or weaker, and feed every time I water.

They are tropical plants and don't like temperatures under about 60º F, but they sometimes wilt a bit in very warm temperatures.

That's about all I can think of to suggest. A picture really would be helpful. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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