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hendi_alex
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Planters with annuals much better than usual this year.

I'm no florist but my planters look more balanced and pleasant than in years past. Am including a short film clip as gives a more realistic experience than a static photo. Please post photos or film clips of your favorite planter grown plants. Here is one grouping of mine from around the front door steps.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/15582147@N04/3593228969/
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

bullthistle
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Your plants look great but the wood looks uncared for.

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hendi_alex
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That floor and the siding board underneath are two upcoming projects. The flooring was put down in 1979 and has seen too much weather for too many years. I'm debating what to use this next time. These boards were called oil penetrated or such, probably very un-environmentally friendly. I'll likely replace the worn piece of siding with concrete board. May check into cypress for the replacement flooring, but will need to see what products are available. I do have some reservations concerning the use of cypress. Any suggestions for alternatives would be appreciated. Am sure that we will be using some kind of solid wood for the porch floor however.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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Have heard good things about locust if you can find it Alex, and not the pressures on it like there is on cypress. Likely cheaper too. My friend Anita used locust planks on her raised beds ten tears back and they are still great; that's in direct soil contact. so I know it will last as decking. Heavy wood though...

The planters look great; you underestimate your abilities sir... and the Coleus is lovely, perhaps "Black Prince" although the green border seems more pronounced... but also a nice compliment to the baskets...

HG
Scott Reil

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rainbowgardener
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alex- you are inspiring me to get out with my camera and take a few pictures... maybe this weekend. Video is out of my scope of practice though.

wingdesigner
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There are composite products out there that require no maintenance, include recycled materials, and look great. The only thing is some of them require 12 or 14" floor joists instead of 16" on center, because they flex more than wood. That doesn't mean they won't last as long, on the contrary; but most folks won't like the flexing that occurs with Trex or some of the other composites out there. The big box stores (Lowe's, Home Depot, etc.) often carry ads for materials in weekly circulars; I bet if you went to their websites they would have what they carry and some info about each, or at least the mfr. name so you could look it up. They come in lots of colours nowadays, too. If I had my druthers, I would have recommended it to my friend up north, he has a huge deck that goes 3/4 around his house, plus stairs.
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Wing

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vintagejuls
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Wing has a great suggestion with the use of 'composite'. There are sooooo many new products that are supposed to be green or recycled. I watch alot of HGTV and some days the entire day is dedicated to building a home 'earth friendly' in and out. 8)

Aside from the big box stores, check with the local lumbar yard or building supplies yard. I'm sure they would have some info or be able to get you in touch with a local contractor.

Your planters are beautiful. I can see your green thumb all the way over here on the West Coast! :o :lol:
~ Julie

Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it well... Emerson

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I hesitate on the composites...

I like the recycling angle a lot, just not sure how great a decking material it is. It wears forever, and I have used Trex as edging before with great effect, but I have seen it as decking in full sun; knew a landscaper who put it in at this house and had to install irrigation to cool the surface down after the sun baked it; it would nearly remove skin it got so hot... :shock:

In a shady spot I would think it would be great; certainly rot resistant...

HG
Scott Reil

wingdesigner
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Doesn't wood do that too? We who have wood veneers on our bikes have to cover them if they're in the sun. (Another good reason to wear leather...)
I suppose a darker shade would absorb more energy than a lighter shade? Besides, (HG) any real gardener would have most of the deck covered in containers stuffed with plants, and a narrow path leading to a patio set. So, deck stays cool, no problem! Deck too hot? Just add more plants--problem solved. :-()
Last edited by wingdesigner on Fri Jun 05, 2009 4:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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hendi_alex
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The decking under consideration is a covered porch with a fairly wide overhang. So only a few plants go there. On the other hand, the deck is literally covered with plants in containers, though there is still a little room for more.

An evening stroll on the deck:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/15582147@N04/3596912470/
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

wingdesigner
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My sound card sucks, so I didn't catch most of the narrative, Alex, but nice JM's, and nice pruning job on them. I'm too chicken to prune for form like that.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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hendi_alex
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Those are just inexpensive Lowes trees. They have never been pruned except for some tip pruning and off course any small dead branches. The plant on the left was pulled this past winter and the root ball was cut back about 50%.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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Having seen how you load your deck with plants I retract my concern about heating; the deck barely sees light under that jungle :lol:

Trex really is rot resistant despite it's wood content; the edging I used on a job a decade back is holding up nicely... it would be great under pots with the steady humidity...

Great job with the images as well; vids and pics... :D

HG
Scott Reil

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