CodeOfHonor
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Suggestions for Good Container Plants?

I'm looking for a few good container plants for my region (southern Wisconsin). I can place them in full sun, full shade or half-half. I would prefer perennials but am willing to take anything. I have a big empty patio and need to put something on it!

Oh, and does anyone know if Shasta Daisies work well in pots? They are quite plentiful in my garden so transplanting them wouldn't be an issue.

pepper4
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Re: Good plants?

Oh, and does anyone know if Shasta Daisies work well in pots? They are quite plentiful in my garden so transplanting them wouldn't be an issue.
I have planted Shasta daisies in containers many of times and they've done great :wink: I can't help you with what other plants to put in containers because I am still learning but I am sure you'll get some ideas and suggestions from this site :)[/quote]
Bambi

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rainbowgardener
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narrow it down

Given that it can be full sun to shade, there's a millon choices; if I limit it to relatively low maintenance native perennials, there's still at least hundreds. Give us some more criteria about what you would like: edible, fragrant, attractive to bees, butterflies, hummingbirds, what are your favorite colors, how big are your pots... then I can give you a reasonable list of suggestions. thanks

CodeOfHonor
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Re: narrow it down

No need to be fragrant. Attractive to bees is okay, definitely for butterflies and hummingbirds. My Bee Balm never seems to attract anything but bees even though I was told it would bring 'round hummingbirds and butterflies. I prefer bright colors like reds, oranges and yellows. Something blue or purple might be nice. Interesting shaped blooms are fun too, much like the Bee Balm. My pots are the basic pots you can get anywhere, about bucket sized I would guess. Though I do have a few that are larger.

I once tried growing Foxglove in a pot and that didn't work. Shame as I think the blooms are pretty.

cynthia_h
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Rather than trial and error, give yourself a better chance by finding a locally owned, independent garden-supply store and asking their advice. The staff will be in a much better position to recommend perennials which will have the best chances of success. Such places are interested in developing long-term clients who will return many times, as opposed to Big Box stores which are much more short-term oriented...

Cynthia H.
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rainbowgardener
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plant suggestions

Bucket sized is pretty small container, that will definitely limit what you can grow. Here's a few suggestions that are all native perennials, pretty hardy and easy care:

Here's some with seeds birds like, some are attractive to butterflies also. These are all full sun, to mostly sunny
Coreopsis, bright yellow, long blooming,
Echinacea (purple conflower) comes in a variety of softer pinks and lavenders and white
Sunflowers (helianthus)
Black-eyed susans (rudbeckia)
Goldenrod nice fall bloomer, gorgeous with purple asters in the fall. Look for a smaller variety (some get 10' tall). It's a good one to grow in pots, other wise it takes over your garden.
Liatris (gay feather) purple flower spikes, butterflies like it.

Hummingbird flowers
Aquilegia (columbine) delicate flowers, don't like full sun
Butterfly weed (aka milkweed, asclepias) brilliant orange
Jewelweed (native impatiens) likes it shady
Cardinal flower (lobelia) brilliant red, likes at least part shade and moist
your Bee Balm
Penstemon

Maybe it's the nurseries I go to, but personally I've never found it too helpful to go to a nursery without a thought in my head about what I want. Just as I asked for a starting place, nursery people usually want some ideas about what you're looking for, before they can be real helpful.

Two things about your small containers: 1) they will dry out very fast, so you will have to be prepared to water frequently. 2) For growing perennials, they will freeze solid in the winter, it's a lot tougher on the plant roots than being in the ground. If you want your perennials to come back next year, it would help if you can protect them-- do you have a garage you can bring them in to? Otherwise pile straw or something around them... Good luck!

CodeOfHonor
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I did try the garage thing this past winter, however I doesn't seem to have worked except with one plant. Should I do anything special when putting them in the garage? I'm not sure if it matters but only one side of the garage is insulated.

Good thing you mentioned Gay Feather! I had one a few years back. Sadly, it drowned and I really miss it. Knowing it does good in a pot is a cheery point.

The Helpful Gardener
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I have native gayfeathers (for me that's Liatris squarrosa var. nova angliae) and they have done great in the soil, but with that shallow corm they should do great (you might want to stake them though, and don't overfeed or they get heavy and start to flop).

HG
Scott Reil

CodeOfHonor
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Are Lamb's Ear and Digitalis good for containers? I am happy to note that two of my plants from last year have started growing back; a hosta and wormwood. :) Progress.

The Helpful Gardener
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Stachys (Lambsear) yes, Digitalis (Foxglove), no...

HG
Scott Reil

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