bali
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Location: pennsylvania

Bromelaids are they easy growers?

I recently purchased Bromelaids and wondering if anyone has the knowledge of the how to raise them.

Thanks.
I have 3 now.

bali :oops: :oops: :oops:

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Kisal
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Location: Oregon

I found a lot of sites online about growing bromelaids. Here are links to a few I thought seemed to have good information:

https://www.teasnursery.com/Bromtext.htm

https://houseplants.about.com/od/bromeliads/a/Bromeliads.htm

https://fcbs.org/info.htm

https://www.plantsindesign.com/care_tips.htm

bali
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Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:02 pm
Location: pennsylvania

Thanks

Reading those.
Sounds tricky.

But I have 3 an hope for the best.. Have2 pups on one now.

b

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Spotted
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Location: Michigan

I've had a bromeliad for almost a year now. all I do is make sure it gets watered in it's cupped leaves, and it's been a fairly easy keeper. i read on a site somewhere that they start producing pups when they are starting to die. and mine has been slowly loosing it's foliage, but it's also produced pups like crazy. All of my friends now have a pup start for their own plants, and my plant is still producing them. When I go to remove the pups from the mother plant, I basically took a serrated knife and cut the pups away when they were half as tall as the mother plant. for my plant, that was about five inches. Also when I first removed a pup, I panicked because the pup I removed, didn't have roots yet, but that really doesn't seem to matter. with roots or without, I haven't had a pup die yet.

bali
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Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:02 pm
Location: pennsylvania

Didnt you root he pup at all ?
Or just put it into soil?

b

thebean
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Location: Niagara Falls, NY

Broms are air plants kinda like orchids. They naturally grow in the armpits of trees with little to no roots they rely on rainfall and collect it in there leaf cups. They feed from the top not the bottom. Roots on broms are used by the plant for support not really for feeding. You could and ive seen it done grow them on a plate of bark.

There are thousands of varities of broms. Good luck

bali
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Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:02 pm
Location: pennsylvania

Do they grow like that in New York?

I have mine all inside>>>>..Daaaaaaaaa

b

thebean
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Location: Niagara Falls, NY

I am in Niagara Falls NY, They are tropical but will do fine if kept outside during summer months and brought in for the winter. Mine sit just fine in a cool hallway for the winter and go out in the back yard during the warmer months. I guess if what you are asking is do they grow in trees in NY the answer is no. Though with some work I guess you could put them on a tree for the summer. They might not withstand a decent storm though. Hope I answered your question

bali
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Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:02 pm
Location: pennsylvania

Yes you did answer it .

i doubted if they grew in trees in the Falls.. I have relations up there .

Cold like here.

Been to the falls one time. Do you have any nice photos of it to show us?

thebean
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Location: Niagara Falls, NY

https://s459.photobucket.com/albums/qq319/thebean1979/gorge%20pics/


here are some of the niagara gorge from this past fall.


Glad i could help

bali
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Location: pennsylvania

Thanks ,

Very nice .. Is the gorge after the water leaves the Falls//

thebean
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Location: Niagara Falls, NY

yes the gorge is below the falls. the pics are of the area known as whirlpool park and devils hole. a few miles down stream of the actual falls

bali
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Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:02 pm
Location: pennsylvania

ok

Very nice .......

:D
I love looking at all the falls.. Bet your tired of it ?

wingdesigner
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Some of the Spanish Moss seen in Southern trees is a tillandsia, one type of bromeliad. I have one at the office that has flowered and died several times. How, you ask? After it flowers, and the flower lasts a long time, it will put out pups and the parent plant dies. So, the pup(s) have flowered and died for several generations now. If you provide proper light and humidity, this can carry on indefinitely, apparently. They are happy in a narrower temp range than most houseplants and don't want direct sunlight. That cool hallway sounds perfect. If you think about their natural growing conditions and try to replicate that (no, don't bring in a tree crotch), you and it should be very happy together. (Now I'm doing couples' counseling... :roll: )
Happy Gardening,
Wing

Tdebruycker
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Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 2:11 am
Location: CT

yes, as easy as they come

I have come to learn that broms are one of the easiest to grow and maintani. they are a classic table top plant, depending on the variety. With water kept constantly in their cups, or misting, and nice sunlight they will thrive. many have a pocket that is in the middle, and you keep water in their at all times. A pineappe is also a member of the bromeliad family, hence being able to cut the top off and plant it. Tillandsia is also from this family, and that is an air plant that needs sun and a weekly misting. I water mine daily however.

bali
Senior Member
Posts: 190
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2008 10:02 pm
Location: pennsylvania

Thanks for the info....

First time grower here.

b

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