lambs ear
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Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:34 am
Location: Illinois

I fell in love with Mulberries and now have questions

Hello everyone,

I have fallen in love with Mulberries!!! My little town is FULL of mulberry trees and bushes and since I am a jam maker I have been berry picking!!! I would love to have some of my own but have no idea where to begin. There are a lot of trees here to get shoots from but I don't know when or how to do this. Also is there a way of pruning the trees to keep them a little shorter so that harvesting will be a little easier?
I'm a "transplant" to Illinois from West Virginia. I have a particular interest in old fashioned gardening and learning the ways of such things.

TheLorax
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Morus alba (White Mulberry) v. Morus rubra (Red Mulberry)

Here's is one of the few nurseries that sells Morus rubra (Red Mulberry)
https://oikostreecrops.com/store/home.asp?cookiecheck=yes&

The Morus rubra sold above is the mild mannered native of North America.
https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MORU2

It is best to wait until next spring to plant one. They will come to you bareroot which is good as the survival rate will be high. If this route interests you, now would be the time to begin learning about how to care for this tree as well as to prepare a site to plant it. I now have 5 and love them. Mine were all ordered as bareroots and all have survived and are doing remarkably well.

Regarding the trees you are seeing around town, they are most probably Morus alba (White Mulberry)-
https://www.invasive.org/browse/subject.cfm?sub=6050
https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=MOAL

It is difficult to tell the difference between the two mulberries at this time of year but certainly not impossible.

The White Mulberry has been formally identified as an invasive species in Illinois. Might not be a good idea to plant one as this species is currently appearing as one of the species in the Draft IL Invasive Plant List and Pathways Report. I suspect we will see legislation where it is illegal to sell this plant in Illinois sometime next year. People have long been eradicating this plant from natural areas. This Asian White Mulberry plant is highly invasive and is additionally a noxious weed.

Should you find Mulberries for sale, you might want to ask the nursery which Mulberry they are selling. It would be Morus rubra you would want to buy not Morus alba. Most nurseries operating in this state are well aware the Morus alba ended up on the above draft and there are a lot of fire sales going on right now. I found one nursery that changed its tag on its plants from Morus alba to Mulberry. Probably in an attempt to unload them easier. A hybrid of alba and rubra is also readily available for sale called 'Illinois Everbearing' and that plant will also be banned as will cultivars that are currently being sold- 'Pendula', 'Nuclear Blast', 'Chaparral', 'Laciniata' and others. The writing is on the wall that the sale of this plant is going to be banned in this state in the very near future and they are trying to unload product.

Please do keep picking the mulberries from the trees around town! Every mulberry you pick is one a bird won't eat and poop out over a natural area!

TheLorax
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Forgot to add that I believe the other Asian Mulberry, Morus nigra, is also listed in the Draft IL Invasive Plant List and Pathways Report.

Celestine Nicolas
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Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2007 5:03 pm
Location: Limburg, Netherlands

Hello Lambs ear,

Did you get any more information in the course of the summer? I have a mulberry somebody gave me to replace an apple tree that died of a spreading disease (too lazy to look up the name and translate it). I'm in The Netherlands. In a couple of years it has grown tremendously, must be about 12 feet now. I'm wondering the following:
- which mulberry it is,
- if and when I should prune it,
- if I am ever going to get fruits if I only have one tree.

So far I have read that flowers are born laterally on new growth. But I also read that I should shorten the new growth to ±6 leaves in the summer. I need to pursue this piece of information as I don't know exactly when to do it or if it matters. I would have thought it might need to be cut back in winter or early spring and that the flowers would develop on the same spring's growth. Apparently new growth from the former season is what is meant.

Couch-grass
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Celestine Nicolas
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Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Jun 21, 2007 5:03 pm
Location: Limburg, Netherlands

Pruning Mulberry Tree

Hello Lambs Ear and anyone else knowledgeable on the subject of mulberries, I believe it's the black one but not sure right now.

Mine grew tremendously and is bearing fruit for the first time but one of the very long branches split at the trunk. There are actually two trunks so we could do without one anyway and cut that whole part down but don't dare do it during summer. I'm always reading about the wounds bleeding but actually this one doesn't seem to bleed at all.

Any ideas? I'll shorten all branches during the winter. Just haven't done any pruning yet at all and forgot about the fruit bearing on new growth. But that wasn't an issue last year anyway.

Couch-grass (Celestine Nicolas)
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biwa
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Joined: Sun Aug 13, 2006 8:15 am
Location: Virginia, zone 7

If your town is anything like mine, lambs ear, it is easy to get a mulberry tree. Pick any spot in your yard and don't mow there for awhile and a mulberry tree will grow there. They are fast-growing so this process won't take long. Mine went from un-mowed spot to fruiting in just 2 years.

I don't personally think mulberry trees require pruning since they're so short (maybe 20 ft tall max), but if you want to prune them anyway, they are very receptive to it. Mine easily takes the shapes that I try to cut it into.

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Diane
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Location: Mass

biwa wrote:If your town is anything like mine, lambs ear, it is easy to get a mulberry tree. Pick any spot in your yard and don't mow there for awhile and a mulberry tree will grow there. They are fast-growing so this process won't take long. Mine went from un-mowed spot to fruiting in just 2 years.

I don't personally think mulberry trees require pruning since they're so short (maybe 20 ft tall max), but if you want to prune them anyway, they are very receptive to it. Mine easily takes the shapes that I try to cut it into.
LOL I have a mulberry tree that grew in a pot. It's now 3 years old and about 8 feet tall. I'd love to find a home for it. I have pulled a few others and even more are growing in pots. The birds must be doing the seeding.
I don't know which one it is, white or red and no berries yet. How can you tell? It took me forever just to find out it was a mulberry.
I have a bunch of other types of trees growing in pots too. (The birds?)None have grown as quickly as this one.
Gardens are a little bit of heaven on earth.

https://s600.photobucket.com/albums/tt87 ... G00047.jpg

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