Linny
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: North Florida

I want to transplant my banana plant

I planted it last year from a two gallon pot in an old enameled bathtub, (off all things!), and it did great. It was about 12" tall when I planted it. I kept the soil faily moist. Two more plants came up from the root. The largest of the plants got about 5' tall and had huge broad leafs. It got full sun from late morning until late afternoon. Towards the middle of summer, all the leaves started pointing towards the ends of the tub. It became sort of a flat looking plant. :( I guess because the roots only had those two directions to grow in. We have an "L" shaped porch, and I want to move it to inside corner of the "L". Here, it will get full sun from early morning until early afternoon. I have some concerns about moving it? Do they take kindly to transplanting? When is the best time to move it? Will this be the right amount of sun for it? I just bought an Elephant ear tuber that I would really like to plant beside it. Will these two survive together? The planting information on the elephant ear says that it tolerates "wetness" well. Will the banana plant? I sure have a lot of questions don't I? Worse than a kid :oops:. Any help will sure be appreciated.

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Grey
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Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

I'll answer what I do know!

The elephant ear will be fine next to the banana. My parents have them growing side-by side in a fairly marshy part of their property (so that answers your wetness question).

As to moving? I think the tree can take it. Banana trees up here are given some pretty rough conditions and they actually survive. People cut the top of the plant off to about one to three feet, put it in a pot, and keep it in their basement for the winter and then bring them back outside. If they can survive THAT, I'd surmise they are pretty hardy.

As for timing, I'd think it would be OK now, or after last frost (I don't remember what part of FL you are in) and before it gets really warm.

Hope that helps!

Linny
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: North Florida

If I am looking at my map correctly, you are in north Georgia. Is that right? I am in Perry, Fl, which is the lower edge of north Florida. You would have had more severe cold weather than I have. If your parents have had success there, then surely I can here right? I'm really glad to hear this. We have had frost as late as March but it is very rare. I think I will take the chance and transplant the banana this coming weekend, planting the elephant ear next to it. Thank you so much for your reply. I am very happy at this point! :D

I have another question or two for you. I hope I do not make you sorry you replied to this thread! You mentioned that people cut their banana plants off about three feet high or so, pot them, and move them inside. I did not do this. Should I have? Here where I live, we get ten, maybe twenty, more or less, overnight lows of below freezing for the whole winter season. Seldom do we get more than two below freezing nights in a row. When the cold killed my banana plant back, I left the dead growth on the plant. I had heard that I should to protect the rest of the plant from the cold. Is that true? When and how should I get rid of the dead growth? Again, I really appreciate you and anyone else taking the time to help me.

Linny

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Grey
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I used to live in central Florida, just north of Tampa. My parents live just south of Ocala, so the temps are a little different. I know they do not ever protect their banana tree or anything.

People up here, and in TN, love having a banana tree outside. Some kind of odd infatuation with the tropical look, I suppose. But anyway. What they do before the freezing weather comes is they cut the plant at an angle, at 3' or so, and bring it in for the winter. They SAY it works... it just sounds brutal to me but hey, I overwinter my old Florida zone 10 plants - Tibouchina and Mona Lavender Plectranthus, so who am I to say someone taking a tropical tree indoors is crazy?

So no, I wouldn't bother with moving the tree indoors if you live in N. Florida. I'd try to protect it as much as you can - cover it or something for those few cold nights you get. It's worth it. Not sure when you should remove the dead growth... I'd probably leave it until I knew the cold snaps were over and that I wouldn't be stressing the plant out any more by trimming it up.

I'm no banana tree expert though... I've never even had one.

Linny
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: North Florida

Grey wrote:I used to live in central Florida, just north of Tampa. My parents live just south of Ocala, so the temps are a little different. I know they do not ever protect their banana tree or anything.

People up here, and in TN, love having a banana tree outside. Some kind of odd infatuation with the tropical look, I suppose. But anyway. What they do before the freezing weather comes is they cut the plant at an angle, at 3' or so, and bring it in for the winter. They SAY it works... it just sounds brutal to me but hey, I overwinter my old Florida zone 10 plants - Tibouchina and Mona Lavender Plectranthus, so who am I to say someone taking a tropical tree indoors is crazy?

So no, I wouldn't bother with moving the tree indoors if you live in N. Florida. I'd try to protect it as much as you can - cover it or something for those few cold nights you get. It's worth it. Not sure when you should remove the dead growth... I'd probably leave it until I knew the cold snaps were over and that I wouldn't be stressing the plant out any more by trimming it up.

I'm no banana tree expert though... I've never even had one.
Well ya sure sound like one :D . Thanks Grey. You may have never had one, but your advice sounds like good common sense to me. I will protect it as much as I can. I have that odd infatuation with the tropical look myself. I had never heard of the Tibouchina before. Lavender I know. The Tibouchina is a very pretty plant, and I love Lavender. You keep on nurturing your little piece of Florida up there! I actually saw more Lavender growing when I lived in Kentucky that I do here. I agree that the cutting off of the banana sounds brutal. It's all I can do to prune anything I've ever tried to grow. I know it's the best thing you can do for a lot of plants, but it still hurts me to do it! Call me silly :oops:

Thanks again for all your input.

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Grey
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Well thank you!

The lavender I mean isn't the herb lavender. It's this here:
https://www.plantzafrica.com/plantnop/plectranmonlav.htm

It's a zone 9/10 plant, no scent, just neat, broad purple-bottomed, fuzzy-topped leaves, with lots of pretty purple flowers.

I have herb lavenders too - Provence grows very well here - I have tried a few other varieties but no such luck, they croak!

This is Tibouchina - https://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=TIBOU - I think you would like it with your other tropical plants - it's VERY easy to care for in a warmer climate. Cuttings take super-well - I could trim mine, stick the trimmed ends into the ground, and VOILA! New plants in no time. Mine hates this whole winter thing - I bring it inside, it threatens to die, and just about when it looks like it won't hang on any longer, Spring arrives and it starts to revive. By the time it looks good and is blooming beautifully again though... it's Fall. We're torturing it. :(

pete28
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Location: White Springs Florida

Linny I am about 50 miles from you in the lake city area and my neighbor has some hardy bananas growing. I know exactly where Perry is so you should be good.
Begin again before you end and start the process over again.

Linny
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Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:50 pm
Location: North Florida

pete28 wrote:Linny I am about 50 miles from you in the lake city area and my neighbor has some hardy bananas growing. I know exactly where Perry is so you should be good.
Thank you so much for the reply. This makes me feel much better! I know exactly where Lake City is also! It's good to have people in the immediate area to get information from. Thanks again.

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