User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27726
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Even though I live in a suburban cookie cutter development, I'm trying to grow as much edibles as I can utilizing the limited space to the max. So naturally, I am squeezing fruit trees into every nook and cranny. :wink:

Earlier, we harvested cherries and I have a semi-dwarf apple tree that is loaded this year. (I might post some pictures of them later)

I'm also growing what I call "Espalier Fence Row" I lost an apple tree when tree guard failed and critters girdled the tree, but I still have the remaining apple tree (Arkansas Black), a persimmon (Prok) and two pear trees (Seckel and Magness)

This spring, we had a late frost that blasted the pear blossoms and I only have three fruits on the Seckel and ONE precious fruit on the Magness :( but the apple tree is full of fruits. :D

Here is a collage of photos from several view points:
image.jpg

... I also have a peach tree that I really think I didn't plant in the right place. It has been growing but very slowly. This year, we are looking at NINE fruits that are almost ready to harvest :-()
image.jpg
Comparatively speaking my little trees and my little harvest might be modest, but I'm having a lot of fun with them and am happy to be able to hand my kids fruits harvested from our own little "orchard" :()

OK, let's see YOUR orchard :D
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

HoneyBerry
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1125
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 5:10 pm
Location: Zone 8A Western Washington State

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

I don't have much to share in the way of fruit trees. I have some berries - black currents are ripening way early this year because of the unusually hot weather. I am going to pick them tomorrow. It's not a pretty shrub but I can post a picture if you'd like. My honeyberry bushes are beautiful plants but the berry harvest was in the spring. My italian prune tree is dropping fruit already - very early. What I have for show-and-tell is not all that great compared to what you have. Just wondering what that thing is in the picture on the lower left, the thing that looks like a shark's mouth. Is that a venus fly trap or something like that?
ISFP "The Artist"

Farseeker
Full Member
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 8:17 am
Location: Qld, Australia Sub-tropical/Zone 10

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

It looks like a plastic dinosaur that has turned on the peach and is about ready to chow down to me.

Curse it's sudden but inevitable betrayal!

This is a lovely idea - unfortunately mine at the moment consists of a few 'sticks in tubs' (bare-rooted raspberries) but I will be sure to check in here when I have something more substantial to share!

HoneyBerry
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1125
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 5:10 pm
Location: Zone 8A Western Washington State

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Yes, it's definately after that peach. I've never heard of a garden shark, but that's what it looks like.
ISFP "The Artist"

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27726
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

:lol: that's a toy ...
The frilled-neck lizard, also known as the frilled lizard or frilled dragon, is a type of lizard that is found mainly in northern Australia and southern New Guinea. This species is the only member of the genus Chlamydosaurus. Wikipedia
He and that piece of garden hose "snake" are trying to protect the peaches from would-be marauders like squirrels and chipmunks. They "move around" every few days. :wink:
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

PomeKing
Full Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 1:57 pm
Location: Cyprus

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Hi guys,

On Figure 1,3 and 5 you can see the pomegranates of the same tree, they are small because it is the first year the tree produces fruit, it is just 2 years old! what are your thoughts about that tree, it has 10 pomegranates right now (its blooms were more) are they okay for its first time?
On figure 6 you can see the tree when it was when planted last year.
Thanks :)
Attachments
↑An other pomegranate tree in my neighbour :)
↑An other pomegranate tree in my neighbour :)
↑Figure 6: The Two years old tree when it was planted on 15/06/2014
↑Figure 6: The Two years old tree when it was planted on 15/06/2014
↑Figure 5:  First time pomegranate
↑Figure 5: First time pomegranate
↑Figure 1: The tree on 16/07/2015
↑Figure 1: The tree on 16/07/2015
↑Figure 2: 7 years old pomegranate tree
↑Figure 2: 7 years old pomegranate tree
↑Figure 3: first time pomegranates
↑Figure 3: first time pomegranates
↑Figure 4: watermelon
↑Figure 4: watermelon

HoneyBerry
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1125
Joined: Sat Jul 18, 2015 5:10 pm
Location: Zone 8A Western Washington State

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

How wondeful to grow pomegranates in your yard! I love pomegranates. That would be like heaven for me.
ISFP "The Artist"

PomeKing
Full Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 1:57 pm
Location: Cyprus

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

BirdLover wrote:How wondeful to grow pomegranates in your yard! I love pomegranates. That would be like heaven for me.
why you can't grow in your area? Space or temperature issue?

Taiji
Greener Thumb
Posts: 885
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:19 am
Location: Gardening in western U.P. of MI. 46+ N. lat. elev 1540. zone 3

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Nice pomegranates. Here in AZ they can grow down lower, but none at my elevation.

Few weeks ago I posted photos of my sapsucker hole ridden apple tree that I inherited with a new property I was fortunate to acquire pretty cheaply. It's loaded with apples! I'm so happy. Have no idea what they are, probably will never know! Previous owner says they are great tho!

Also, there is a nice pear tree on the prop that is in much better condition, but both trees need TLC this fall. Pear tree only has a few, about 10 pears I would guess.
pears.JPG
nice apples.JPG
loaded.JPG
Both trees are about 25 feet tall and have been neglected, but I think were cared for properly at first; they have the general shape of trees that were pruned properly to begin with.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27726
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Wow! looks fantastic! I guess you are going to be busy this fall harvesting and processing.

Will you need to protect them from animals, etc? My apples are targeted by groundHOG, squirrels, and chipmunks. And they usually take the good ones. :evil:

I harvested 4 of the peaches yesterday. Sooo good! :()
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

Taiji
Greener Thumb
Posts: 885
Joined: Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:19 am
Location: Gardening in western U.P. of MI. 46+ N. lat. elev 1540. zone 3

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Ha ha, this is a good question! I'm not really sure what all the pests are at this new location, other than many many gophers. The whole prop has been neglected. I suppose maybe the birds will head for the apples?

Next fall or next spring I would like to plant some nice fruit trees, but don't know exactly what are the best ones? Maybe you guys could make some suggestions? Of course, I realize there are certain varieties that are good for my locale, probably need to check at local nursery too. One apple I always loved, but hardly ever see anymore is winesap. Wonder if you can still get it, or if it would even be a good choice for around here?
I absolutely love Jonagold too.

PomeKing
Full Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 1:57 pm
Location: Cyprus

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

look what i found when i was walking, lots of grapes!
Attachments
20150803_182501.jpg

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27726
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Look at that! Goes to show you can get really creative about where and how to plant and grow stuff :cool:
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

PomeKing
Full Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 15, 2015 1:57 pm
Location: Cyprus

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

in my area its really hot, in Nicosia, i can see the neighbors to have trees like figs, all citrus, pomegranate, olive, grapes and maybe pears

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27726
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Fruit Trees -- let's share photos of developing fruits

Here is a photo of my semi-dwarf Enterprise apple tree. If you live within this cultivar's growing zones and are looking for an apple variety to plant, I highly recommend it. It is resistant to almost every apple disease. For me it's "very resistant" ratings against fireblight and cedar-apple rust were the deal maker since I have lost other pear and apple trees to one or the other or both before I learned to do my homework.

Enterprise When fully ripe is juicy and has incredibly complex, spicy and sweet flavor. It's better after a month in storage after being harvested fully ripe. It's supposed to ripen in mid to late October in this area, so these prematurely reddening fruits, while lovely, are a sign of something amiss. After several seasons, I learned to force harvest those (most of them don't want to come off the tree) early.
image.jpg
You can see some of them are pitted with black holes -- they are not always the problem however. Most of them are cosmetic at this point. But my Enterprise can get affected by Brown Rot because there are three highly susceptible Europen plum trees in my garden. If these fruits are left on the tree to await semi- to full- ripe stage one-two months from now, Brown Rot will infiltrate through the blemishes and they will become completely unsalvageable.

Some of the clusters should have been thinned anyway. So I started picking the reddest ones now. Often, those are the ones starting to show brown rot infection with watery blotchy flesh. But in early infection stage, they actually taste sweet as if they are ripe. Even the immature fruits, while tart and dry, are already flavorful -- like Granny Smith.

I trimmed away all blemished skin and flesh and cooked them up. Hardly any of the black holes go deep but some become black pinholes that I suppose must be due to cuculio or coddling moth, but I rarely find any worms/bugs inside.

I thought I was going to make apple cobbler, but these premature fruits -some with still white or light brown seeds- fell apart, so I ran the mixture (apples, sliced whole organic naval orange, ground cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, plum wine, elderflower syrup, honey, date sugar, brown sugar, cultured butter) through the food mill and made two quarts of applesauce. :()
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

Adam26
Full Member
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:53 am

blackberry

Not so much blackberry plant as fruit . Was in the overgrown area of my garden and found hundreds of blackberries, happy accident

Return to “FRUIT FORUM”