DoubleDogFarm
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

Hang in there Sheila, you are only a few years away. Circle your trees with cardboard and a deep mulch.

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Eric

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sheeshshe
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

I just got some grass clippings from my neighbor. I think I needed it for the trees, is that right? I couldn't remember what it was suggested for, I just noticed that they were about to toss a huge pile into the woods! I'm sure I could get some from their woods pile too, if I need it :) we don't really have grass here as I'm sure you could guess :) not much of it!
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

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applestar
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

Eric has a whole orchard of those -- Cardboard+mulch.

Compost/composted manure, spoiled hay, etc. in fall and in spring.

It doesn't have to be grass -- it can be leaves, hay, straw, cut weeds (but it's a question of how much weed seeds are mixed in) -- it harder to get them weed seed free later in the season.
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sheeshshe
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

could I toss things like rotten apples on there too? like at the end of the year where the orchard we go to, we can get whatever is left over. would that help them at all?
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

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applestar
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

Strictly speaking, you want to avoid putting spoiled fruits under fruit trees.

Ideally, what you want to do is use vegetables under fruit trees and fruits under vegetables. This is supposed to help keep pests and diseases that may be in the decomposing remains from re-infesting/re-infecting.

If you have a large orchard as well as vegetable garden, I understand it's best to keep separate compost piles and use the compost made from veg garden waste for the orchard and compost made from the orchard waste in the vegetable garden.

If you can make hot compost, then this wouldn't be an issue.

...Oh wait, isn,t this...? :o ...sorry Eric, we've gone OT in your thread... :oops:
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DoubleDogFarm
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

Please continue :)

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sheeshshe
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

oops, yes sorry!


that makes sense about fruits and veggies. I thought of the fruits only because the orchards leave their apples under the trees to replenish the soil/
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

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sheeshshe
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

DoubleDogFarm wrote:Hang in there Sheila, you are only a few years away. Circle your trees with cardboard and a deep mulch.

Image

Eric
my neighbor and I go out trees together at the same time. hers are fruiting this year. her apple trees are huge. lots of apples on one of the trees. what we noticed is, she has two rows of trees. the trees next to her driveway are all nice and big and healthy looking and producing stuff nicely. as the trees get closer to the woods, they get smaller and smaller, to where the closest ones are, there are barely any branches on them. she's going to try lime as well.
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

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applestar
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

DoubleDogFarm
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

Roots, We are Borg

Ideally, a range of 6.0 to 7.5 is optimal for orchards; however, excellent orchards occur on soils ranging in pH from 5.0 to 8.0. In general, the availability of micronutrients is lower in alkaline soils. Nutrients such as iron and zinc may not be in a form available to plants. In contrast, phosphorus may become limiting in acid soils. Also, in acid soils, aluminum can become available. It is not a nutrient and is toxic to plants in high concentrations. At pH 6 and higher, very little aluminum is in solution.

Additionally, soil pH affects the abundance of microorganisms. Bacteria are generally more prevalent in alkaline soils and fungi dominate in acidic soils. This is important because microbes are responsible for the cycling of nutrients. The most diverse and numerous populations are found in near-neutral soils. Furthermore, soil pH influences pathogenic microbes, and growers can adjust pH to manage some plant diseases.

Nutritional problems associated with low pH (<5.0)
bark measles of Delicious apple

manganese (Mn) toxicity

calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) deficiencies

restricted root growth or regeneration due to aluminum (Al) toxicity

reduced availability of P

reduced efficiency of N and K use and poor response to N and K fertilizers

bark necrosis

stunted growth

High pH values may also lead to nutritional problems.
The availability of many micronutrients (Mn, Cu, Zn, and B for example) decrease as soil pH increases.
https://soils.tfrec.wsu.edu/webnutrition ... soilpH.htm

Eric

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sheeshshe
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

that is neat about the roots. a lot to think about!

Ok, so what about putting crushed oyster shells down around the trees? it would last longer term than putting down lime, and I could layer it with the cardboard and grass clippings??
Sheila, gardening on the zone 4b/5a line.

DoubleDogFarm
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Re: Double Dog Farm orchard July 2013 (Pix Heavy )

Oyster, crushed lime stone, but I like the convenience of bagged lime.

My weekly routine. Cardboard on Monday and a load of horse manure hay on Tuesday evening.

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Sheila, To bad you don't own a truck.

Eric



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