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Gary350
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How close together to plant fruit trees???

I bought several fruit trees at Lowe's in Arizona. Most are in 1/2 gallon pots.

I bought a pomegranate tree, tangerine, orange, and cocktail tree.

Cocktail tree is 3 trees all grafted together, plum, white peach, nectarine.

I wonder how close together to plant the trees?

I have no clue what to do with a pomegranate?

I also bought 2 types of grapes and blackberries.

I still plant to get a Pear, Apple and Pecan tree.

What is a white peach?

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applestar
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Are the fruit trees grafted to standard, semi-dwarf, or dwarf rootstock?
That will determine the optimum distance apart. If dwarfing rootstock, it helps to know which kind if you have that info, otherwise, you'll have to go with generally accepted distance.

White peach is white fleshed as opposed to yellow fleshed peach.

Pecan will be much taller/need wider spacing than fruit trees, but in edible landscaping resources, pecans with more open leaf and branch structure is considered a better canopy tree for understory trees and ground level shade tolerant garden. I believe you need to plant two different varieties for cross pollination/best production unless there is at least one other pecan or hickory tree nearby.

I believe pomegranate is more drought tolerant than others... Apples and pears have similar needs, and citruses have different cultural needs compared to the others... i.e. Have you planned how to group them based on what they need?

Dwarf fruit trees can also be kept pruned to occupy less space/distance apart, including espalier style.

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ReptileAddiction
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If I were you I would plant the pomegranate in a bed with annuals and some other pomegranate trees. They have different needs so I personally wouldn't put them with the rest. Same with the citrus. As for the apples and other things I have seen high density plantings which means a lot of trees close together (personally my favorite) and can include planting 3-4 trees in the same hole with basically one canopy. I would go 5 feet between them because you will want to keep them pruned to a small size anyway.

bwhite829
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Not a fruit expert just like to read alot which might lead to misinformation. Check out Dave wilson nurseries and backyard orchard culture on youtube. they have alot about high density and "backyard orchard culture" which basically explains the difference between commercial growers and individuals and why we don't need to put them 10 ft apart.

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ElizabethB
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iGary - you hit a sore spot. Just because it is available at Lowe's, Home Depot or other big box store does not mean that it is suitable for your region - ESPECIALLY fruit trees. Fruit trees are region specific. You have to plant varieties suitable for your region. In 05 I went to work at Lowe's as a nursery specialist. Because of my background as a Master Gardener and Landscape Contractor I felt an obligation to my customers to provide them with the correct varieties for optimum success and harvest in my zone. I was appalled at my first shipment of fruit trees. The grower was out of Oklahoma and the varieties were not at all suitable for south Louisiana. I called the buyer who was working out of the home office in NC. He had no horticule knowledge or experence. I explainded my concerns and even faxed him a list of recommended varieties published by the LSU Ag Center. His response to me was that he did not care. Lowe's has a one year gauranty on their plants so as long as it does not die in the first year whether it produces or not was not his problem. I was so disgusted that when a sales specialist position opened in the kitchen cabinet department I transferred out of the nursery.

Having had my rant please call your County Agent for a list of region specific recommendations. Ask for home orchard publications. That will include planting instruction, tips on fertilizing and directions for proper pruning. If the varietiies that you have are not on the list return them for a refund.

Sorry but unless you are knowledgable about the variety suitablity big box stores will cause you a world of grief.

Ok - I'm done.

Good luck
Elizabeth - or Your Majesty

Living and growing in Lafayette, La.

When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

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ElizabethB
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BTW - I have purchased citrus trees from Lowe's only because I am familiar with the grower. The same thing with vegetable plants. Even then there is one store in my area that I will not buy from because their nursery specialist is an idiot and does not emplow proper watering practices.
Elizabeth - or Your Majesty

Living and growing in Lafayette, La.

When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

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ElizabethB
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Gary - I found this link on growing fruit trees in Arizona. Hope it helps

:oops:

I just realized that I forgot to paste the link.

https://ag.arizona.edu/pubs/garden/mg/fruit/index.html
Elizabeth - or Your Majesty

Living and growing in Lafayette, La.

When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant. ~Author Unknown

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