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Intriguedbybonsai
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Location: Escondido, CA (USDA Zone 9-10)

Wild strawberries

I remember these wild strawberries that grew around our house as a child. My mother always told me not to eat them or I'd get sick. Of course I had to try them anyways, but they had no flavor. The berries were very small, completely red, hairy, and they seemed to have more seeds on them than fruit. What are these strawberries called?

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!potatoes!
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Location: wnc - zones 6/7 line

probably 'indian strawberry' or 'mock strawberry,' Duchesnea indica. 'true' wild strawberries (Fragaria vesca) are truly delicious...the mock ones are bland, but i doubt they'd make you sick unless you gorged on them.

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Intriguedbybonsai
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Location: Escondido, CA (USDA Zone 9-10)

Yeah I guess those are it. I remember the blooms being yellow instead of white. Thanks for your reply. :)
Last edited by Intriguedbybonsai on Thu Dec 29, 2011 12:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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GardenRN
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Those little ones grow all over here...they have almost no taste. Once in a while you get about as much sweetness as one granule of sugar lol. But actually they are good for you still. I add them to salads and eat them in my hand. The kids love em too. We have never gotten so much as a tummy grumble from them. Eat away if you want to.
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

But gardenRN, if you live in Virginia, you should encourage the locally native wild strawberries - Fragaria virginiana -- instead. They are delicious and my kids prefer them to the larger cultivated varieties I've planted for them to enjoy even though I did my usual thorough research and bought the varieties for best flavor.

Our wild strawberries started on their own in the front yard under a Japanese maples (courtesy of birds no doubt) and are in the process of creating a large island around the TWO Japanese maples. DH allows for the island to grow more into the lawn every year. :wink:

Is Fragaria vesca native to western U.S.? I saw them in ...hmm... Territorial maybe?

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quiltbea
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Location: Southwestern Maine

I have some of the tiny strawberries and they are called Alpines. They are perennials and have limited runners but should be replaced with new plants every 3 or 4 years when production drops. They grow in a small mound with tiny fruits but mine have white blossoms.
I have 3 of the red ones and 3 of the yellow berry which have a pineapple flavor. They fruit all summer long but not very much productivity. I usually pull off a few while in my raised bed garden, just for a little snack and they are tasteful but not very sweet.
[url=https://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/819/051311alpinestrawberrie.jpg/][img]https://img819.imageshack.us/img819/8445/051311alpinestrawberrie.jpg[/img][/url]

Uploaded with [url=https://imageshack.us]ImageShack.us[/url]
[url=https://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/9/062211strawberriesquina.jpg/][img]https://img9.imageshack.us/img9/2521/062211strawberriesquina.jpg[/img][/url]

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Comparison between a regular Quinalt berry and the Alpines.
Personal note: I'd rather have regular strawberries for the space they use.

ruggr10
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Location: Brunswick, Maine

I have alpines too. I love them! They melt in your mouth and taste like jolly ranchers.

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GardenRN
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applestar wrote:But gardenRN, if you live in Virginia, you should encourage the locally native wild strawberries - Fragaria virginiana -- instead.
I'd love to! But in 20 years in Va I haven't ever seen anything but those tiny wild ones growing wild. Maybe they are more prevalent closer to WV or the eastern shore. I'll have to do a little research.
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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GardenRN
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Applestar I just looked at the pictures online. I haven't ever seen those. And I have lived from Richmond to DC in different parts of Virginia. (that covers about half the state). All we have are these little guys. They're maybe 1/4-3/8 inch in diameter. Almost flavorless but good for you from what I have read.

[img]https://img.photobucket.com/albums/v687/grnpez/images.jpg[/img]
Jeff

USDA Zone 7a, Sunset Zone 32.

Failure is only a fact when you give up.



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