User avatar
Aya
Senior Member
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 5:05 am
Location: The Emerald City : Zone 8A

Snatching Blackberries

Here in the Pacific Northwest we have an abundance of wild blackberries, and I was wondering if it was possible to snatch a few to plant for my own uses.. how would I go about harvesting a wild plant to put in a large container? Would I just cut off a cane and plant it or what? Most people around here consider them to be weeds..but is it legal to go out and take some? Any tips would be appreciated!

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

I would be a bit wary of taking them, not because of any laws, but because they might have been sprayed with something. If you know of anyone who has some and doesn't want them, I'm sure they wouldn't mind you digging them up, and then you could ask if they had been sprayed.

I'd be absolutely overjoyed to have you to take the ones in the alley on the other side of my back fence. They haven't been sprayed and nobody has used the alley for years, so they should be okay.

You could always plant berries, too. I think they produce fruit in 3 years. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

User avatar
Aya
Senior Member
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 5:05 am
Location: The Emerald City : Zone 8A

Well I'd definitely take them from ya if you were just a couple miles closer ;)

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

https://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/noxious-weeds/weed-identification/blackberry.aspx

Class C noxious weeds

You would be better off buying Marionberries. :wink:

Eric

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

We've moved blackberries from one area of our own yard to *the* blackberry patch. Otherwise, we ruthlessly dig them out. *The* blackberry patch is managed pretty ruthlessly, too: we cut the canes that have borne fruit in a given year to the ground during late December/early January, the only "dormant" season they seem to recognize around here.

Since the blackberries are biennial, half of the canes need to be allowed to survive for us to get berries each year. We've missed pruning them down only ONCE since we moved into this house in 1997. Do I need to tell you that, the year after we missed pruning, we had an unholy mess/thicket of blackberry vines/brambles? It's always a bloody operation (I bleed, the vines don't care), but that time was The Worst.

If you acquire blackberry starts, be sure to dig flashing down into the soil as if the things were bamboo. If you can find it, 12" flashing wouldn't be excessive. I may go looking, to keep the vines from encroaching even more on my raised beds....

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

User avatar
Aya
Senior Member
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 5:05 am
Location: The Emerald City : Zone 8A

What is "flashing?" I had some raspberry and blackberry starts I bought this year, along with a blueberry bush. All I have left is my blueberry bush and my one golden raspberry plant. The others my dog tore up and paraded around with :lol:

I've always thought to keep my berry bushes in planters so they wouldn't go crazy, but will this stunt their growth/production at all?

cynthia_h
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 7501
Joined: Tue May 06, 2008 11:02 pm
Location: El Cerrito, CA

I've just finished a several-minute search on the Internet.

Sadly, the terminology used by the guys at my local Ace hardware store is *not* the terminology used on the Internet. Flashing is curved (gently rounded-off, corrugated) metal approx. 3" or 6" or, if you're really lucky, 12" wide. However, as a gardener, you want to jam it into the soil on its edge rather than use it in the normal way, so you (we) think of it as 3", 6", or 12" deep or, maybe, tall or high.

Flashing provides an impermeable barrier to the roots of Plant A (in Berkeley, it was our bamboo) so they don't spread post-haste wherever they want to. Our bamboo had to first go down 12" and then come back up 12". That slowed its rate of invasion significantly; previously, it had been almost kudzu-like.

Cynthia

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Flashing refers to thin continuous pieces of sheet metal or other impervious material installed to prevent the passage of water into a structure from an angle or joint.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashing_(weatherproofing)

Usually used places like where a chimney joins a roof, cover the join with metal flashing to prevent water from collecting there and leaking/soaking through.

But yes, be careful what you wish for! I don't have blackberries, I have raspberries, but they are becoming a nuisance in my yard already after just a few years. I think the birds spread the berry seeds around so they don't just spread from the roots, they pop up all over...
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

User avatar
Aya
Senior Member
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 5:05 am
Location: The Emerald City : Zone 8A

@Rainbow: That is a good point, I never thought about that...

Do you think its possible for me to build some sort of framing around my berry plants so the birds can't get at them? Picture almost a dog run type of situation made of wood and wire, with a roof - so the sun/rain can get through, but the birds can't?

User avatar
soil
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1855
Joined: Fri Jan 23, 2009 1:40 am
Location: N. California

why plant them when you can just go harvest them. they are in pretty much every creek, stream and river here. last year i harvested a 5 gallon bucket of berries from within a mile of my house. took me a couple days but i was eating berries for a long time. the ones with the roots in the water are less flavorful but usually bigger. i prefer the ones that are on more dry land, the taste is far superior. both get picked and eaten though.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

User avatar
Aya
Senior Member
Posts: 171
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 5:05 am
Location: The Emerald City : Zone 8A

I agree, and I'll probably do that this year

Return to “FRUIT FORUM”