wordwiz
Green Thumb
Posts: 331
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2010 9:44 pm
Location: Cincinnati

Looking for info on dwarf fruit trees

Three months ago, I had never heard of these. Now, I'm looking at growing maybe 10 or more. Two each of sweet and tart cherry, apricot, peach and apple. I found an inexpensive site that sells them for ~ $11 each, but the plants are only 1.5-2.5' tall. Thanks to a poster in this forum, I found RaintreeNursery. At least twice as expensive, but the trees are much taller (4-5') and from what I understand, have better rootstocks.

What advice can you give a complete and totally Newbie?

Mike

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28178
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Personally, I like ordering from nurseries that are closer geographically and climatically to my own garden. Shipping distance unless you're willing to pay for premium faster shipping, and adapted winter hardiness and weather conditions.

I look for disease resistant cultivars, based on locally prevalent diseases.

Finaly, study the root stock information, and call and ask if not listed. JONAS recently posted some info on that.

Root stocks can not only affect mature size but also varies in ability to handle soil conditions. Also some ROOTSTOCKS are more disease resistant or more susceptible.

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

First off, what do you mean by dwarf? Most of the nurseries carry what are called Semi-Dwarf. A true Dwarf are a Little harder to come by.

I will also say that a Honey-crisp apple in Washington is the same Honey crisp apple in Ohio. We do have different choices on rootstock.

Raintree and Burnt Ridge are my local nurseries. :wink:

Eric

wordwiz
Green Thumb
Posts: 331
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2010 9:44 pm
Location: Cincinnati

Eric,

A tree that will grow 8-12' tall, give or take a foot.

Apple,

Trying to learn this stuff! The good thing is I have at least a month before I really need to order the trees.

Mike

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

Planted my two latest trees about 3 weeks ago. Liberty apple and a Bosc pear.

Most of my trees are in the 10 to 15 foot range. I keep them down by pruning. I'm not as timid at pruning as I use to be. After the third year or so, I switch to summer pruning. You end up with more fruiting spurs and a whole lot less water sprouts.

Eric

User avatar
Ozark Lady
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1862
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 10:28 pm
Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet

I have been checking out fruit tree vendors too.
I want: black haw, black tartan cherry, bing cherry, jonathan, winesap, maybe Arkansas black apples, oranges, tangerines, lemons, grapefruit and bananas. Maybe some other tropicals as folks teach me about them.

The tropicals are for my atrium.

So far, for outside fruit, the best prices that I have found is:
https://www.arborday.org
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

JONA878
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1014
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:14 am
Location: SUSSEX

I love that range of fruit that you list there and I'm envious as to being able to grow such citrus in your garden. :lol:
One thing I would question...why Jonathans?
If there was one variety that I would have some reluctance with it is that one. Most growers over here stopped growing it as it is so prone to mildew problems...and I do mean problems.
An apple a day.....keeps me in work.

User avatar
Ozark Lady
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1862
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 10:28 pm
Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet

Oh really? I was not aware of that.
I picked Jonathan for flavor alone.
So, maybe I should pick something else? Braeburn has normally been my favorite apple. I like the texture and the taste.
I am open for suggestions!

Actually, the tropicals can only be outside about 8-9 months of the year, and will need to be in the atrium for the rest.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

User avatar
!potatoes!
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1909
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 6:13 pm
Location: wnc - zones 6/7 line

maybe a jonathan cross, like jonagold? lots of those grown in the states, and i haven't heard much about mildew issues with them. they are a bit sweeter than a standard jonathan, of course.

i may not know enough about varieties that do well in the south to be very helpful, but closer to jonathan taste, maybe 'fortune' (an empire/northernspy cross)?

JONA878
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1014
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2009 6:14 am
Location: SUSSEX

Agree there Potatoes... Jonagold and Jonagored etc...super flavour and easy to grow to boot.
There are quite a few new vars around now that are super, but so many are still under liscence so you can't get your hands on them yet.
An apple a day.....keeps me in work.

User avatar
Ozark Lady
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1862
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 10:28 pm
Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet

Sweetness is fine in an apple.

Some apples don't do so great with our heat and humidity, so I may need to watch for that. But we do get winter, and snow and all that junk.

What I don't like is the meally texture of store bought Red delicious etc. They just are boring. Now fresh ones might be totally different, does anyone know?
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28178
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

There's a cultivar called Jonafree, touted to be resistant to some diseases. No idea about the flavor though. I still say Enterprise is really nice. :wink:

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

JONA878,

Do you know the affects on apple taste, texture of the same variety grown in the North vs South? Wet vs dry climates?


Red Delicious. I have read that the Red Delicious apple in the grocery stores today is not the original apple.

Eric

User avatar
Ozark Lady
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1862
Joined: Tue Jan 05, 2010 10:28 pm
Location: NW Arkansas, USA zone 7A elevation 1561 feet

Maybe I should just kick out the Jonathan idea, and go with Granny Smith.

The grandkids love tart apples. And I mainly want them for dehydrating into chips, or pies, jellies etc.

So, how has Granny Smith done on the whole?
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

User avatar
!potatoes!
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1909
Joined: Tue Apr 14, 2009 6:13 pm
Location: wnc - zones 6/7 line

in answer to the question whether red delicious taste better/have better texture fresh, my experience working with a grower in vermont who grew many varieties (and cut a row of 70 year old red delicious every year for firewood and to make way for other varieties) suggests that yes, they are vastly better fresh. for a couple of weeks, tops. and even then, the flavor is not terribly impressive, just better than a mouthful of mealiness. i think we need to accept that red delicious have done well in the markets for their shipability alone. anyone growing their own can do better.

ahem. apologies for the rant.

DoubleDogFarm
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 6113
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2010 3:43 am

You can add Yellow Transparent to the mealy mushy list. My parents had a Yellow Transparent and a Thompson king in their back yard. The King is a good, big, firm apple.

Eric

wordwiz
Green Thumb
Posts: 331
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2010 9:44 pm
Location: Cincinnati

I hate to get back on topic, it seems almost un-forum like(!), but I really did start this thread to get advice on raising these. Raintree Nursery wrote back to me and suggested maybe buying from someplace else, since their trees will take a year or two to produce fruit, which may not look great for a Demonstration Project. While I really appreciate Katy's caring, I knew it would be at least 2012 or 2013 before I get a single piece of fruit.

One thing I did try to learn about was the different type of rootstocks and what they mean for my area. Who would have thunk it made any difference!

Any advice that will HELP ME?

Mike

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28178
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Hmm... I thought I DID give advice that would help. :?:
What else do you want to know?

wordwiz
Green Thumb
Posts: 331
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2010 9:44 pm
Location: Cincinnati

applestar wrote:Hmm... I thought I DID give advice that would help. :?:
What else do you want to know?
AS,

You sort of did but it was stuff I can find (and did). I guess I'm looking for stuff that only growers would know that I should know:
Personally, I like ordering from nurseries that are closer geographically and climatically to my own garden. Shipping distance unless you're willing to pay for premium faster shipping, and adapted winter hardiness and weather conditions.
I've searched as many sites as I can and Raintree seems to offer the best trees, based on size, rootstock and other factors.
I look for disease resistant cultivars, based on locally prevalent diseases.
Alas, not many growers around here to ask info from. Plus, a big big plus, I don't have a clue what to ask. It's the ole "it's what you don't know to ask about that will hurt you" syndrome!
Finaly, study the root stock information, and call and ask if not listed. JONAS recently posted some info on that.

Root stocks can not only affect mature size but also varies in ability to handle soil conditions. Also some ROOTSTOCKS are more disease resistant or more susceptible.
This part, I have been researching and trying to learn.

Treat me like a kid that is trying to learn everything possible - from how deep and when to plant, staking, watering, how long to expect fruit to appear, other things I have not thought to ask. You will not insult my lack of intelligence!

Mike
Last edited by wordwiz on Fri Mar 25, 2011 3:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 28178
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

In NJ Rutgers State Ag Extension Svc posts bulletins on their website with recommended disease resistant fruits. I'm sure your state has similar program and publications.

There are many srcs of info, but I learned a lot from Adams County Nursery website. They're located in Pa. and potentially a good source, but they have minimum order that was too much and I havent purchased from them.

I have purchased from Starks Bros., Edible Landscaping, and MILLER nurseries with good results. But there are other sources that have more specific root stock choices if that is important to you.

I have
Enterprise, Pristine, Ark Black apples
Magness and Seckel pears
Emperor Francis and White Gold sweet cherries
Carolina Belle peach
And a nectarine name that I can't remember right now
Prok persimmon
Triple Crown thornless blackberry
Kiwi Gold raspberry
To name a few.
Planning to get North Star pie cherry next 8)

Return to “FRUIT FORUM”