bb43
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Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 4:23 pm

my fruit trees are sick :(

Hi! Im growing kiwis and lemon and apple trees in my room.
I have a few questions I hope someone can help me with.

my lemon tree has some tiny white/cream colored scabby things forming on the bottom of the leaves. I hope you can see it.
[img]https://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs889.snc4/72264_1567255658274_1141890285_31709455_6933462_n.jpg[/img]
[img]https://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs459.ash2/73287_1567256298290_1141890285_31709460_8305125_n.jpg[/img]

small white spots seem to be appearing on the top of the leaves above the scabby bits.

and my kiwi is just sick looking. :(
[img]https://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs911.snc4/72425_1567256418293_1141890285_31709461_7617_n.jpg[/img]
I had spider mite on all my plants and am pretty sure I have obliterated all the ones on my lemon and apple trees. -they hide better on the kiwi. Is this just spider mite damage?

also my kiwi looks like it has dandruff, i don't know anybetter way to describe it. random shall white flakes that just kinda sit on the fuzzys on the leaves. -dosent move not a bug... is this normal? (sorry i couldn't get a picture. my camera didn't have a macro)

I'm sorry it these types of posts are annoying, I've been looking online for a while and just cant seem to find anything. And my kiwis are too big to drag to the Biology department.

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Kisal
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Welcome to the forum! :)

It sure looks like spider mite damage to me. What did you use to get rid of the pests?

BTW, spider mites like warm, dry conditions, so anything you can do to increase the humidity around the plants will help prevent further infestations. Spraying or misting your plants frequently with water can help. Another method is to set the plant on a tray filled with gravel, and keeping water in it up to, but not above, the surface of the rocks. You don't want the bottom of the plant's pot sitting in the water. The water evaporates and increases the humidity in the air around the plant. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

bb43
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Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 4:23 pm

Thanks for the quick reply!

1:1 water rubbing and alcohol in a spray bottle seemed to do the trick on the lemon and apple trees.

the mist would get caught in the fuzzies of the kiwi so I have to go and soak the leaves. I'll try the tray of water. and keep attacking them with the rubbing alcohol.

Any idea whats growing on my lemon tree?

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Kisal
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Try adding about 1 or 2 teaspoonfuls of soap to each quart of your water/alcohol mixture. That will reduce the surface tension of the water, allowing it to spread across the leaves and penetrate into tiny crevices more easily.

Be careful that you use real soap, not a detergent, because detergents can burn the leaves. Most dishwashing liquids are detergents, which cut through grease more readily than soaps do. Choose an unscented liquid Castile soap, if you can find it. Dr. Bronner's is the brand I use. I buy it at a store that sells organic foods. If you can't find something like that, any good Castile soap, Ivory, or even Murphy's Oil Soap (most stores carry that) will work fine.

When you spray your plant, be careful to get the tops and the bottoms of the leaves, all around every stem and branch, and spray until the solution is dripping off. Repeat that every 5 to 7 days, to kill any new mites that hatch out from eggs the adults may have laid on the plant.

When you mist with water, it's okay if the water gets trapped in the hairs. What you're trying to do is get moisture into the air around the plant, not necessarily on the plant. However, the hairs such as are on your Kiwi are often designed to trap dew from the night air, allowing it to evaporate in the sunlight. That will still increase the humidity around the plant. Cactus spines do the same thing. :)

I prefer to use trays to raise humidity around my container plants, though, because it's more of a constant, 24-hr/day, process. Spraying/misting with water, OTOH, only raises the humidity temporarily. The gravel trays do have the drawback of growing algae, sometimes, so you may want to add a drop or two of algaecide to the water in the trays. I just use the kind I use in my ponds and birdbaths. It's safe for plants and all animals. You might find it at an aquarium store, or in a well-stocked garden store. (Or online. ;) )

I have to leave now, but if someone else hasn't offered information about the lemon tree by the time I get back home, I'll check it out and post.

HTH! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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Kisal
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Sorry to be so late getting back to you. First, you should know that I do not grow citrus, so all I can share with you is what I've found by research. So, here goes ...

One thing that can affect citrus is salt buildup in the soil. You would see white/brownish crusty deposits on the soil surface, around the rim of the pot, or in the drainage saucer. The salts are usually the result of fertilizers, which are necessary for Meyer lemons, especially, because they are heavy feeders and require a lot of nitrogen. Drenching the soil, i.e. repeatedly pouring water on it and letting it drain off, can sometimes remove the excess salts from the soil. Repotting the plant in fresh soil helps, as well, especially if as much of the old soil as possible is removed from the root ball. You don't have to remove it all, just gently knock or break off as much soil as you can from the top, sides and bottom of the root ball. Then repot with fresh soil. If the plant doesn't need to go into a larger container, I scrub the salt deposits off of the old one with a stiff bristled brush and clear water before I repot the plant.

Lemon trees need a soil with a low pH (acidic). If the pH of the soil gets too high, the tree won't be able to access the iron it needs to maintain healthy leaves. This condition is called iron chlorosis. I've seen that condition in other plants, and the leaves in your pics don't look chlorotic to me. But again, I don't grow citrus.

And, finally, many lemon trees are propagated by cuttings, which are sometimes infected with a virus called Citrus Tisteza. It can remain dormant for a long time, only to become active when the tree is weakened by some environmental stressor. The source of the stress can be something as simple as the low humidity and low light levels found in most homes, especially during the winter.

My best recommendation to you is to take a sample of the affected leaves to your nearest Extension Service office. The specialists there will be familiar with the particular diseases found in container grown lemon trees in your location. If you take a small soil sample along with you, they might be able to check the pH for you while you're there. The Extension Service in my area offers that service. (The Extension Service office in your area should be listed in the white pages of the phone book.)

HTH! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

bb43
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Joined: Tue Oct 26, 2010 4:23 pm

Thanks for the help.
I'm not seeing brown crusties on the dirt, but i might repot him anyway.
Ill look into the the Extension Service too.

meanwhile this
[img]https://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs923.snc4/73672_1570335055257_1141890285_31713330_3204536_n.jpg[/img]

[img]https://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs467.ash2/74074_1570335295263_1141890285_31713331_8071739_n.jpg[/img]
has happened. :( i don't know if its related or not.

and here is the "dandruff" i was talking about:
[img]https://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs833.snc4/69382_1570335655272_1141890285_31713333_1040511_n.jpg[/img]
[img]https://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs950.snc4/74350_1570335895278_1141890285_31713334_229992_n.jpg[/img] im not really worried about it, but it sure is strange.

Also, I seem to a case of really tenacious powder mildew on my apple tree. I wash it off every day or so and it keeps coming back. I tried the water/bakingsoda/dishsoap a while back and it never seemed to work. any ideas?

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Kisal
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Location: Oregon

Try a milk solution. Mix the milk and water at a ratio of 1 part milk to 10 parts water. Since your plants are indoors, nonfat milk probably would be preferable, as it produces less of a sour-milk smell. Any kind of milk will do, even cheap powdered milk.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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