dim
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pear-tree next to orange-tree

hello to all!

I'm thinking to plant a pear tree next to orange (5 m or 16 ft distance). So, what is your opinion about this neighboring trees. Should i wonder about the difference trees which will be side by side ?
I mean the pear tree would be affected by the orange (or the oposite) ?

thanks ,
Mitros!

PS. The climate is rather warm and this helps rather the orange over against the pear but i don't mind of it ( i will try it...)

JONA878
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Hi Dim,
There is no obvious rreason why you cannot plant these two side by side. but there is one thing that may effect them being together.

This relates really to the way they may both grow.
Most citrus will be inclined to grow more vigorously than the pear will.
This could result in the pear being crowded out in the availability of light and water.

16 ft is quite a good spacing and should be ok for the first few years at least. But keep an eye on it.

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applestar
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I really couldn't think of any reason not to either, though I don't have experience growing citrus except in containers.

Just about the only thing I can think of is that citrus prefers soil with lower pH. So while the spacing is sufficient while the trees are young, it may become an issue later on....

Well, OK, one other thing that just occurred to me. This isn't a preference, but I believe Pear can tolerate somewhat heavier/clay soil better whereas citrus prefers well-drained soil. Obviously, citrus needs warmer micro-climate than pear, especially in the winter months, while in a climate where citrus can be grown, you might want to seek a colder micro-climate for the pear so it gets sufficient chill hours to bear fruit.

JONA878
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I agree with Applestar....I hadn't even considered the temperature you may have in your locality.
Pears do require a winter chill to effectively break dormancy and produce fruit bud.
A low of at least 6-9c is required for around 6 weeks in the winter period.
Thats why in the warmer climates most top fruit is grown higher up the hill and mountain slopes , while the citrus is on the lower areas.

dim
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well the winter here (somewhere in Greece) is mild. With a fast appreciation i will say the min temp is about 5 or 6 Celcious degree. This doesn't keep more that a few days


I learn many things that i didn't know. As ph and soil type, the temperature demands for pear-trees but also the roots growing stuf

thanks! :D

dim
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JONA878 wrote: I hadn't even considered the temperature you may have in your locality.
Pears do require a winter chill to effectively break dormancy and produce fruit bud.
well the winter here (somewhere in Greece) is mild. With a fast appreciation i will say the min temp is about 5 or 6 Celcious degree. This doesn't keep more that a few days

I learn many things that i didn't know. As ph and soil type, the temperature demands for pear-trees but also the roots growing stuf

thanks! :D

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lorax
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I grow pears and citrus side by side on much smaller spacing than you've got, and I haven't seen any problems at all. I keep both trees reasonably pruned, and the citrus attracts bees that go on to pollinate the pear (which is a really good companionship.)

Another thing that you'll likely have to deal with is this: citrus trees are very attractive to ants and prone to aphid and wooly scale infestation, and this will carry over to the pear just because it's in the same area. A bit of prevention for the ants, like using Tanglefoot or similar traps on the trunks, goes a really long way.

JONA878
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lorax wrote:I grow pears and citrus side by side on much smaller spacing than you've got, and I haven't seen any problems at all. I keep both trees reasonably pruned, and the citrus attracts bees that go on to pollinate the pear (which is a really good companionship.)

Another thing that you'll likely have to deal with is this: citrus trees are very attractive to ants and prone to aphid and wooly scale infestation, and this will carry over to the pear just because it's in the same area. A bit of prevention for the ants, like using Tanglefoot or similar traps on the trunks, goes a really long way.
I reckon your 10000ft altitude must go a long way to giving you plenty of winter chill Lorax.

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lorax
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You don't have to tell me, Jona. It's winter here right now and it's freaking chilly (15C in the daytime, 3-5C overnight). Despite which, my plums have bust into full bloom.... I'm hoping they know something I don't. I moved away from Canada to avoid being frozen solid like a popsicle.

JONA878
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lorax wrote:You don't have to tell me, Jona. It's winter here right now and it's freaking chilly (15C in the daytime, 3-5C overnight). Despite which, my plums have bust into full bloom.... I'm hoping they know something I don't. I moved away from Canada to avoid being frozen solid like a popsicle.
If you still pick a crop of plums after -5 at full bloom ....then you've got some mighty tough plums Lomax.
Ours over here have been wiped out at -2 this year.

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lorax
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We'll see, won't we? I've got small fruit set on the Mirabel (black) and Claudia (red) plums already, and the Korean Cherry plum is going great guns and starting to produce leaves along with little fruits, which just blows me away. The Dorado (gold) plums have buds but nothing open yet.

The pear tree, on the other hand? It's still dormant. And the citrus are just chugging away - I would have expected them to be more perturbed than they seem to be.

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