codger
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fruit trees in containers

Has anyone tried growing dwarf fruit trees in containers? I'm redoing my garden and converting to raised beds i thought some nice fruit trees would look cool if i could grow in decorative containers. how big would the containers need to be? im trying to determine if this is a viable option or not. im thinking oranges pears and maybe apples.

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Diane
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https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/urban/dwarf-fruit-trees-a-planting-guide-for-fruit-trees-in-containers.htm

There is a short article here that tells you all about it. It says it is easy.
Good luck.
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applestar
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I'm not a fan of container growing (I'm just so bad at it :roll: ) so I'm not the best one to be giving an answer, and I'm sure more experienced folks will chip in, but I do have one caution: Being out in the open and above ground, the roots in the containers will suffer greater fluctuation of temperature. On the cold end of the thermal spectrum, the general rule of thumb is that in containers, it's at least 1 USDA Zone colder and safer to assume 2. Your choice of fruit trees may be affected accordingly.

JONA878
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I'm with you Applestar.
If you are in an area that gets cold winters then you will allways have the problem of root damage and unless you have a very large container the rootstock will have to be of the most dwarfing kind or the pruning done with great care.
You will also in hot weather have the added burden of getting enough water into the plant to sustain a good crop.
I know of many people who have successfully grown very nice trees.....but there are many more who have great difficulty on troublesome years.
That said......if you don't have a go...you will never know.

Jona.
An apple a day.....keeps me in work.

codger
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well im in sacramento calif area we do get into the 20s once in a while during the winter. we definitly get some frost and freezing but no snow.
I don't know what zone im in we have dogs and they did in a cherry tree that was in the yard when we moved in using their own liquid fertilizer blend so i figured the planters would protect the trees by getting them above water level.

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Diane
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My Doberman can still reach large pots with his watering. He seems to think they're for that purpose!
When I water them, I really water them to make sure I dilute his deposit.
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thanrose
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Codger, I'm weighing in a little late on this.

Whatever containers you use, your root zones will be hotter than the air temp for most of your warm months. For those of us in zone 9, this can be a real problem. Hot roots means they almost cook, and they dry out faster with the heat. Go for ample containers, go for lighter colors, and watch carefully.

eeyore47
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container apple and pear trees

I've had 2 apples and one pear since last March 09 (now Oct 09) The apples have grown much taller than I expected and the pear is only about 8ins high - apples about 3foot. I would like now after reading on this forum to transplant them into the soil - any advice? I thought their roots would be happier being able to spread.
vicky forder

JONA878
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Where did you get those trees from Eeyore?
Trees that low sound as if they are seedlings and growing on their own roots.
Normaly apples and pears are grown grafted onto rootstocks as a method of both hight control and true to variety certainty.
This would make them much taller than the hights you have given.
If they are grown from seed then you will have to name them whatever you want as they are not a known variety. ( You only know one parent....not the other).

That said I think that they need to get a little more hight before you plant them out. The pear at only 8 inches needs a bit more strength.
Put them in a 10 inch pot and plant out once the roots have filled that.

Jona
An apple a day.....keeps me in work.

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!potatoes!
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regarding the less-insulated/protectedness of roots in pots: it takes space and labor, but i usually drop the more-sensitive of my potted trees in the ground after leaf-drop and then mulch them well...haven't lost one yet...

and yeah, i'd agree that an 8 inch pear doesn't suggest grafting.

davecito
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This is something I'm sort of learning by doing - I have several trees, and they are too young to produce fruit, but it has been enjoyable. I've been growing mostly subtropicals, which generally have both a max and min temperature to keep in mind, and here in central North Carolina we can get temps into the teens a few nights every winter, and a few 100-degree summer afternoons, though extended periods at either of those extremes are unusual.

I have eureka lemons, guavas, tangelos and feijoas sprouted from seed, and some have done well, others not. I'm trying to sprout some kumquats and cherimoyas now.

I also have two other grafted citrus - a calamondin and a yuzu, which are both ~2 feet tall. The cal had to shake off a few pest issues, but has recovered and resumed slow growth. The yuzu has unexpectedly become - far and away - the most vigorous of the citrus. In spite of their subtropical nature, they got a bit sluggish in the high heat and humidity of summer here - when fall temperatures came in, they got a lot more vigorous, almost immediately. The yuzu is starting to seem considerably more hardy and rugged than most other citrus.

I've got a cinnamon tree in a 7 gallon pot, and that has been the easiest. Very lush continual growth, seems to prefer spring/fall conditions; warm days and cool nights.

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funnyguy
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I understand drawf fruit trees do well in self-watering containers. We plan to do this our selves, we're in zone 8. The hot temps in summer will probably be more of a challenge than the minimal freezing days in winter. We use light colors, and mulch with white plastic. It's worked just fine this summer with our vegetable garden - all in self-watering containers. Our okra was the size of trees, and the corn did quite well in the containers and were about 8 ft. We tried plain containers, and we couldn't keep them watered. The self-watering has been a raging success.

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