InuYasha
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Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:06 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Working around a mulbery tree

For many years I had a turtle habitat in my grandparent's backyard. Well I have sold my turtles, and I have been interested in creating a zen or dry landscape garden. My biggest consern is our large mulbery tree that completely shadows the entire area. There is no chance of it leaving, so I am trying to find a way to work around it. It likes to drop leaves, allows little to any light into the space, and come November the branches have to be cut down. There is pretty much no other space for me to create my garden, not to mention the space as of now is an eye sore. Can someone help me?
Live for today, plan for tomorrow

The Helpful Gardener
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Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

A Zen garden eh?

There is an old Zen koan that says if you meet the Buddha on the road you must kill the Buddha, if you meet the father on the road, you must kill the father, etc., etc...

Sometimes the only way to move forward is to eliminate the past and all the preconceptions you're bound by...

even if it's a mulberry tree...

Scott

InuYasha
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Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:06 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ

And there in lies the problem, it isn't my tree, it is my grandparents. :(
Live for today, plan for tomorrow

The Helpful Gardener
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Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Ah yes...

Raking a gravel area would need to be a very regular affair under a mulberry, a notoriously messy tree.

On the other hand it's supposed to be a regular affair anyway, so...

The regular raking would keep off leaves and mosson the gravel, but would allow (probably help) grow moss on any stones that you set under it, so no problem there...

Just an awfully messy tree; maybe offer a replacement, like a black pine?

Scott

InuYasha
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Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:06 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ

I don't know how old this tree is, but it must be at least 3 feet in diameter at it's widest point (seeing as most trees are not completely round). My family loves the tree. I supose regular raking is my only option.
Live for today, plan for tomorrow

The Helpful Gardener
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Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Oh I didn't know it was a family member (which at that caliper it is... :wink: )

Well, it is considered an honor to be the one at the temple selected to rake the garden; think of it as a daily award.... :)

Scott

InuYasha
Newly Registered
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:06 am
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Flatery will get you everywhere, lol. Thanks anyways.
Live for today, plan for tomorrow

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