jannie pedersen
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Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:02 pm
Location: Portland, OR

planting containers with a Japanese feel

I AM INTERESTED IN PLANTING SOME FAIRLY LARGE CONTAINERS WITH PLANTS THAT WOULD BE KEEPING IN THE JAPANESE STYLE OF MY FRIEND'S SURROUNDING GARDENS. THE AREA IS IN ALMOST FULL SUN MOST OF THE DAY.

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Piet Patings
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 10:00 am
Location: Lelystad, Netherlands

So, what is the question, or is this just for information ?
Piet, Tsubo-en

Herb3
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 7:43 pm
Location: Victoria, Canada

Jannie,

Just as a start, I should think that Japanese Maple (Acer Palmatum) of a variety that won't grow too big for a container, and some conifers, including some that might be pruned into what I believe is called "Cloud Pruned" shape (i.e. resembling pom-poms) might look compatible with your friends' garden, so long as they were placed in suitable spots. The containers themselves should, I suggest, be as plain as possible & made from wood or, if ceramic, of sudued colour with no, or very little, ornamentation.

To help in assessing the situation, could you post some pictures of the view of you friends' garden from your own site, and of your own space, taken from various viewpoints?

Herb
Last edited by Herb3 on Tue Jul 21, 2009 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Piet Patings
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 10:00 am
Location: Lelystad, Netherlands

Ah.... this was a small language barrier (for me that is).
Further to Herbs advice I would like to add that you can look at it as regular bonsai but more or less over sized to be regular.
These are the types of trees and shapes that would fit.
What is even more important is the soil composition.
Where other container plants are often put into potting- or container-soil, here you want a mixture that would be more close to that used to pot bonsai.
A mix of loam or clay, potting-soil and sand. And the pots must have a hole (or more) in the bottom.
This soil will regulate the moist far better than regular soil so it won't get too wet feet and it will not dry-out during your first holiday absence.
Hope this also helps (thanks for the hint Herb).
Piet, Tsubo-en



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