dleecafe
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 8:52 pm
Location: New Hamburg, New York

Finding Stones and rocks

Hi,
I'm interested in incorporating a Zen garden using stones and rocks. I was wondering how everyone obtains their stones and rocks, do you buy from a local garden supply or do you look around in nature for something that might be welcome in your garden? Thanks :)
Happy Gardening, glad to be here!

MaineDesigner
Green Thumb
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 4:17 pm
Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

I buy my boulders from trusted stone yards and private land owners. Taking stone from public or private land without permission is stealing and it is a huge problem in the Northeastern U.S.. Unscrupulous landscapers, stone masons and stone dealers are often dismantling old stone walls without permission and taking the stone.

dleecafe
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2008 8:52 pm
Location: New Hamburg, New York

thanks for the info

Thanks for the information, I guess I need to do a little research into what I'm looking for, and I can understand how it could create a huge problem if not were not done in the proper way. :)
Happy Gardening, glad to be here!

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koiboy01
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Posts: 171
Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2006 7:49 pm
Location: U K

Hi,
Here in the UK the only limestone rocks that you can get have got to be recycled ie someone has redisigned there garden and don't need them any more and sell them, it is illegal to take the limestone from the landscape as the limestone pavement was disapearing from the countryside so no one is allowed to take it now.
George.
anyone who never made a mistake never made anything.

kelnig
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Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Feb 12, 2008 10:49 am
Location: rydal nsw australia

rock

in australia there are many farmers who want to clear their paddocks of rock. You should check with the local authority in your area and this could be an option for you also. see my garden on forum new 1/2 acre etc i collected all rock usd from a farmers paddock 38 ute loads in total. have hulk arms know ha ha. :lol:

dinker
Senior Member
Posts: 178
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:36 pm
Location: ks

To bad you don't live alittle closer i live on a rock pile of lime stone but you can also cheek your nurseries some sell rocks.
and living on a rock pile is a pain you cant dig a hole with out a sledge hammer

WandaRichards
Full Member
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 2:16 pm
Location: Durham, NC

quarries

Check in your yellow pages. There may be quarries very close to where you are. There are tons around here in North Carolina. And they are very economical.

Herb3
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Posts: 49
Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 11:43 pm
Location: Victoria, Canada

The problem with rocks is finding ones that have suitable shapes.... quarried rocks tend to be too angular & jagged & river rocks tend to be smooth & rounded - often, as one expert put it - too much like giant marshmallows.

Here's a picture of a small one that I found -

https://www.pbase.com/image/102921525

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koiboy01
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Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2006 7:49 pm
Location: U K

Hi Bert,
That's a lovely rock youv'e found.
koiboy01
anyone who never made a mistake never made anything.

dinker
Senior Member
Posts: 178
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2008 1:36 pm
Location: ks

cool rock's :D

Herb3
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Joined: Sun Jun 17, 2007 11:43 pm
Location: Victoria, Canada

Yes, it's quite a nice rock, but it taught me that rocks, even small ones like this, are very heavy indeed. The above ground part of it is only about a foot high, & I reckon that 2/3 of its bulk is below ground. It helps of course if you can find a rock that needn't be buried so deep. It it took me many hours of work using a big crowbar to position this one the way I felt looked best. Anything bigger would have needed either several strong men or some sort of power equipment to maneuver into place.

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Piet Patings
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Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 2:00 pm
Location: Lelystad, Netherlands

Rocks, stone and the like...

Well, in Netherlands stone are scarce. That is one of the reasons that we have only few in our karesansui garden and make "heavy" use the Japanese gardening principle that, in a garden shrubs and stone can be used interchangeably to represent mountain-scape scenes.

We only have few exceptions that where acquired from a local stone yard.
The heaviest one just being erected. See my Recent activities: [url]https://www.karesansui.nl/html/page_activities.htm[/url]

We have one authentic specimen (see the third photo from the top): [url]https://www.karesansui.nl/html/page_obj_tsukubai.htm[/url]

If you use stone (representing mountains) try to find "sabi" specimen (see: [url]https://www.aisf.or.jp/~jaanus/deta/s/sabi.htm[/url] ).

Perhaps this knowledge can be of use, Piet,
Piet, Tsubo-en

chio88
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Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Sep 29, 2008 3:41 am

Nice rock Herb! :wink:

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superfleurs
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Posts: 38
Joined: Sun Dec 14, 2008 9:13 am
Location: France

I just joined this forum today, so I hope everyone here is still around. :)

First of all, I joined because of all the helpful advice I've read here about Japanese gardening as i would like very much to create one.

koiboy , just want to mention that I have admired and had even bookmarked your website about a year ago, long before I found this site. :wink:I really love that moongate you created and would like to do something similar with a big square concrete opening that I have presently. I'm thinking of putting in curved molds on each corner, including bottom corners, and filling in with concrete in order to create a round opening into the, hopefully, future japanese garden.

PietPatings, I just checked out your website and am very impressed! And that rock, what a job that must have been! :shock: It must be your pride and joy now.
one catches more bees with honey

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Piet Patings
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Posts: 91
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2008 2:00 pm
Location: Lelystad, Netherlands

Thank you superfleurs..
And yes I am proud. Now I am thinking on how to "adjust" the planting around the Shumisen stone, to better take advantage of this new situation.
That is something for the next spring.
If I can be of help, just ask. However as you noticed much is written on the website. Just yesterday I added the whole new section on Construction and Build of the garden.
Enjoy,

P.s. If you have a queastion or topic you better create a new topic on the forum to better reflect that.
Piet, Tsubo-en

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