FairyDust
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Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 6:39 pm
Location: Browns Mills, New Jersey
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Elderberry

I'm thinking of putting in an Elderberry bush behind the pond (like about 20 feet away in the back where it gets full sun). The pond is situated between 7 oak trees and then in the back behind the pond is an area that gets full sun and its in the corner of our yard (where the fences meet). I'd like to put something back there that gets pretty tall over time to give us a little privacy from a nosy neighbor who has a high deck.

I also want something that will provide food and shelter for birds. Would an Elderberry bush be a good idea? From what I've read the the American Elderberry (which is a native plant too, another bonus!) gets 10 to 12 feet high and about 10ft wide. So its definitely the mature size I'm looking for. But does it keep its leaves year round providing shelter from the elements for the birds? Right now my yard has no shelter from the elements in the winter since the oaks drop their leaves.

opabinia51
Super Green Thumb
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Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2004 9:58 pm
Location: Victoria, BC

In my experience elderberries do not keep their leaves year round. They tend to look quite spindly in the fall and winter.

FairyDust
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Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Mar 17, 2006 6:39 pm
Location: Browns Mills, New Jersey
Contact: Yahoo Messenger AOL

Do they still provide a lot of food and maybe nesting places for birds during the spring and summer at least?

Fermented
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Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 9:38 pm
Location: ME 4b

We have elderberry growing wild. They are spindly. Someone told me I would never see a ripe berry and they were right, the birds love them. The plants that have not been eaten by deer are surrounded by some sort of honeysuckle. So the birds nest in the honeysuckle, eat the elderberries and play in my garden less.

constance
Full Member
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jul 12, 2006 4:28 pm
Location: Southern Illinois

You might think of planting a juniper. They are evergreen, and have lovely blue berries that are particularly attractive to the Cedar Waxwing.

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