TheLorax
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What are the three most over used trees where you garden?

What are the three most over used trees where you garden?

For me Calleryana pears (Bradford, Cleveland, etc.), Norway maples, and Russian or Autumn olives. It never ceases to amaze me when I see a beautiful new home with one of the above cheap big box trees out front as a specimen. The Asian Callery pears have been so overused in landscapes that in spring it actually stinks around here. They should force builders to plant them in their own yards if they’re going to be allowed to buy truckloads of them to pollute new neighborhoods. Man oh man those trees reek.

bullthistle
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I guess it depends where you live. In NC crapemyrtles and dogwoods are planted everywhere but they are bueatiful when in bloom that I don't mind the overplanting. Bradford pears suck but if you live in a Nothern zone or any zone for that matter since when are builders original thinkers, since most of the new homes are architectual disasters.

cheshirekat
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I see far too many tiny trees in new developments. They plant a bunch of little things and half of them die off the first three years. The rest are slow growing and pitiful looking, and provide no substantial shade or habitat for wildlife.

We need more trees that are healthy, disease resistant and good for us and wildlife. And people really need to plant more trees and take care of the trees that are growing.
"Love all God's creatures, the animals, the plants. Love everything to perceive the divine mystery in all." -Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Toms92gp
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Location: Louisburg, NC zone 7b

bullthistle wrote:I guess it depends where you live. In NC crapemyrtles and dogwoods are planted everywhere but they are bueatiful when in bloom that I don't mind the overplanting. Bradford pears suck but if you live in a Nothern zone or any zone for that matter since when are builders original thinkers, since most of the new homes are architectual disasters.
You forgot Mimosa trees, which are invasive and planted to much. Yes the Bradford pears are over done, I got 2 clevland pears in my front yard but thats it for those kind, any other pears I plant are going to have edible fruit. There is one house near me that has to have about 3 dozen bradfords in the front yard. To much of the same thing is just boring.

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Jess
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Ornamental cherries are done to death here. Why they cannot plant a crab apple instead I will never understand. Far prettier, robust and with autumn interest that feeds the birds.
Next would have to be conifers. Fine if they have the space to grow but too many people buy a little thing in a selection pack for a hanging basket or a winter pot then plant it in the garden without any idea of what it is or the final size. Ten years down the line it has killed off everything in the vicinity by sucking the ground dry, has outgrown its little suburban plot and is shading the house and/or garden. The owners then panic, cut it back too hard leaving a brown, dishevelled, deformed specimen that will still grow to its final 100ft height. The council in its wisdom then slap a preservation order on it.... :roll:
Last but not least those awful artificial looking trees, like Kilmarnock and 'Hakuro Nishiki' willows, stuck on a pole and called a tree. They are always sickly, invariably sucker and I have yet to see a specimen worth keeping.....Just my opinion in case anyone has one! :shock:
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

praying mantis
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My neighborhood has a grove of silk trees running amuck. Doesn't anyone look down the street and wonder why there is a silk tree in every front yard. I hate those pink blossoms that come up as weeds throughout my yard.

MaineDesigner
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Maybe I'm just not seeing worst of it but Maine seems to be relatively free of the horrible tree landscaping choices. There apparently was period when Acer platanoides 'Crimson King' and similar cultivars were extremely popular but I don't see that many newer plantings. Although Norway maples are still planted here Acer rubrum seems to be more commonly used.

While I do see poor choices for trees the mistake I much more commonly see is the issue Jess mentioned - totally inappropriate spacing and scale. A tree that will eventually be 50' - 80' (roughly 15M - 24M) tall planted within 30' or less of a residence is simply bad planning. Trees out of scale with the property and/or house, trees too close to the house or to each other and general over planting to give that instant landscape look are all mistakes I see daily.

TheLorax
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Trees out of scale with the property and/or house, trees too close to the house or to each other and general over planting to give that instant landscape look are all mistakes I see daily.
Guilty as charged but I did it to myself by planting trees I grew from seed too close. Am beginning to correct the mistakes. I was making my selections based on the species and totally didn't factor in aesthetics 10 years down the road let alone 25.

Irie
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Location: Savannah, GA

Sweet Gum trees are used too much here - those little spiky balls that fall all over the yard is a mess and the trees themselves don't bush out so they are ugly.
Water oak trees here seem to be a problem too - we have had 3 die in the past 5 years and I have been told that they will just fall over if the ground gets pretty wet. The top of one fell on our truck last year and damaged it and then we had to pay to have a large one that was dying removed - it was $675 just for that one. (The Live Oaks on the other hand are gorgeous and we love the 3 we have in our yard)
Georgia Pine trees - they are beautiful along the roadsides or places where there are no houses. We have 4 in our yard and they are so messy and the yellow pollen in the spring gets all over everything - you can't open the windows when the tempartures are nice because everything in the house gets covered with that pollen.
I would rather have flowers on my table than diamonds around my neck.

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mdvaden
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Flowering pear, Leyland Cypress, and honestly, Japanese maple.

Not that J. maple is used, but how many are planted.

They can get verticillium here, and it's best to plant just one or two, not 4 or 5 in a small landscape.

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JennyC
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Location: NW Georgia

Here it's Bradford pear (actually, that's more Atlanta; don't think I've seen any here).

Sweetgum, certainly, but does anybody really plant that? Again, I haven't seen any here.

The worst "trees" here are privet. When it's over 25 feet tall and the trunk/stem is over 6 inches in diameter, I call it a tree!
Jenny C

petalfuzz
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Bradford pear are very popular here in NW Ohio, as are various maple trees. Conifers aren't planted much that I see. New developments will actually shy away from trees and just plant bushes.

Crab apple trees are awful! All the ones around here are infected with a fungus. The leaves turn brown and fall off in the summer and any fruit isn't fit for birds. At least they flower and look great in the spring, but really!

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