blackberryhill
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Is this a Magnolia?

[url]https://www.flickr.com/photos/26331550@N06/[/url]
A Magnolia??? It just randomly popped up near my mother's house.
Very pretty.

Gardenmom
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I don't think so. I'm not sure what it is, but I don't think it's magnolia. They have a much different, more leathery leaf.
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TheLorax
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I don't think this is a Magnolia either but for other reasons.

I have a thought of what this might be but I'm simply too embarrassed to say so given it's growing in Georgia.

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imagardener2
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At first glance it looks like a [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana]banana plant[/url]. Then the next thing to come to mind is a [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loquat]loquat[/url]. Finally, it brings to mind a [url=https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/interiorscape/Brassaia_actinophylla.html]schefflera[/url], although it only has 1 leaf per 'unit'.

Could be a 'Banana Shrub' (Michelia figo), but the unfurling leaf (you're right, Lorax) leads me to believe it's more likely of the Araceae family, possibly the Arisaema genus.
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

TheLorax
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Don't laugh but... I was thinking Ficus elastica.

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imagardener2
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How is that any more 'out there' than my guess of Araceae Arisaema?
"Our elders instruct us to always walk upon Mother Earth with respect, gentleness, and with thankful hearts. We must never deviate from the fundamental precept of stewardship, or we will be capable of causing great harm."

TheLorax
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Because Ficus elastica is only hardy in zones 10 and 11. F. elastica could possibly survive in a microclimate of 8 or 9. I suppose there could be a cold hardy ecotype out there that I don't know about. That plant photographed is growing in Georgia.

Irie
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I don't know if you ever figured out what your mystery tree is however I took this picture of a Southern Magnolia that I have in my yard and it does look very similar.

[img]https://i197.photobucket.com/albums/aa15/mvanlieshout/SouthernMagnolia.jpg[/img]
I would rather have flowers on my table than diamonds around my neck.

opabinia51
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Ha! Before reading the text I was going to type; Now that's a magnolia!

They have a great huge Magnolia outside the Biology Building at our local University. Wonderful plant.
Feed the soil, not the plants.

TheLorax
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Watch your tree closely when it shoots out new leaves. It's really an interesting process to watch because they bloom, grow new leaves, and drop old leaves all at the same time. The plant in the photograph above has a leaf unfurling with no bloom present. It just doesn't work this way with magnolias.

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