Fitchy
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2007 6:25 pm
Location: Fitchburg

Lightly trimming a Maple tree?

Hi,

I have a mature maple (40ft) tree that is very very full. To the point the branches almost reach the groung when leave are wet. I fear if I do not trim some of the branches I could lose the whole branch due to the weight of the rain soaked tree branches. Is there a special way to trim a foot or so off the end of the branches?

Thanks!

opp2
Senior Member
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 11:47 am
Location: Greater Toronto Area-zone 4-5

Re: Lightly trimming a Maple tree?

Fitchy wrote:Hi,

I have a mature maple (40ft) tree that is very very full. To the point the branches almost reach the groung when leave are wet. I fear if I do not trim some of the branches I could lose the whole branch due to the weight of the rain soaked tree branches. Is there a special way to trim a foot or so off the end of the branches?

Thanks!
I'd call your local arborist and have them do it.

Fitchy
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2007 6:25 pm
Location: Fitchburg

Re: Lightly trimming a Maple tree?

Fitchy wrote:Hi,

I have a mature maple (40ft) tree that is very very full. To the point the branches almost reach the groung when leave are wet. I fear if I do not trim some of the branches I could lose the whole branch due to the weight of the rain soaked tree branches. Is there a special way to trim a foot or so off the end of the branches?

Thanks!
Thanks for that great advice!

Fitchy
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2007 6:25 pm
Location: Fitchburg

Re: Lightly trimming a Maple tree?

Fitchy wrote:
Fitchy wrote:Hi,

I have a mature maple (40ft) tree that is very very full. To the point the branches almost reach the groung when leave are wet. I fear if I do not trim some of the branches I could lose the whole branch due to the weight of the rain soaked tree branches. Is there a special way to trim a foot or so off the end of the branches?

Thanks!
Thanks for that great advice!
When I have mechanical difficulties with motor vehicles I work out matter diagnose and correct matter. When I need to build a addition or repair I use intellect and request additional help for unknown areas, When I want to cut some branches I expect to get better advise from respective amateurs and pros. Not easy answers my kid could have thought. Call an Aborist. Is this place this simple?

MaineDesigner
Green Thumb
Posts: 439
Joined: Thu Nov 09, 2006 4:17 pm
Location: Midcoast Maine, Zone 5b

Taking a foot off is easily done, just cut immediately above (toward the growth tip) a node (where you see buds or bud scars) using sharp by-pass pruners. A healthy maple can easily put out over a foot of new growth in a year so it isn't exactly a cut once and you're done with it process. A good professional is likely to take off considerably more but should do so in a manner that provides a less temporary fix.
Although she focuses primarily on shrubs, Cass Turnbull's books on pruning are excellent. I also recommend the books by the late Dr. Alex Shigo.

chitownclark
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Oct 26, 2007 2:38 pm
Location: Chicago, Illinois

Don't just chop off the ends of the limbs, you'll encourage a welter of new shoots. That's a process called pollarding, and not generally admired in this country. It is done a great deal in Switzerland.

Better to step back, examine the shape of the tree, and decide where thinning could take place. Then cut the entire branch off right back to the main limb or trunk.

If nothing else, examine the platform (lowest) limbs, and cut off the lowest branches projecting out below the tree's profile. This will elevate the head of the tree, tighten up the silhouette, and remove inefficient branches that get little sun.

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hi Fitchy,

Pruning is a bit of an art and a science. It's best not to remove more then 20% of the live growth of a tree at one time in one year. Pruning very large limbs is not recommended as they can't effectively callous over and the open wound can leave access for pests and disease. May, June, July, November and December are the best times to prune maple.
https://www.emerysgarden.com/infosheets/trees_pruning.htm

Maybe these guides will be helpful.
https://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/howtos/ht_prune/prun001.htm
https://www.aridzonetrees.com/AZT%20Interactive%20Buttons/Illustrations%20Index.htm

Newt

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