esetterlvr
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Amethyst Falls Wisteria questions?

Wisteria amethyst falls
Fri May 15, 2015 1:28 am

Hello, I just purchased 2 American wisteria, Amethyst Falls, to train on a trellis we are about to build. I have 2 questions. Although I grew up with wisteria in my backyard, I just read it is toxic to dogs. I have a puppy. Depending on which website you visit it is mildly to severely toxic, and can cause mild stomach upset to death (again depending on what you read). Any thoughts on this? I do have lily of the valley, English Ivy and hyacinth, which also are toxic, which I've had here for decades. Question #2: Upon closer examination, the 2 wisteria plants I brought home have quite different leaf appearance. Seller says his grower only grows one variety. If it is grafted, shouldn't it look identical?
Thanks for your thoughts. (I'm wondering if I return for something else in the morning ? :-(

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Amethyst Falls Wisteria questions?

Hi and welcome to the Forum! :)

Most toxic plants are only a problem if the puppy eats them. You probably know if your puppy is likely to do that or not and evidently have had no problem with the pup eating other toxic plants.

But wisteria is not something you plant on a "trellis." It may take two or three years to get established but then it rapidly gets huge and massive and collapses whatever structure it is climbing over.

Here is a picture of mature wisteria plants. Notice the size of the pillars supporting this arbor!

Image
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... unda11.jpg

Re the leaf appearances. Can't comment on that unless you post pictures of the two different leaves.
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