Itoero
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Laurus

My Laurus has suffered during the cold and wet weeks.
Many leaves are turning yellow.
I also haven't fertilised him during the summer.
Can it help to give some liquid kelp?

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Laurus

Is it Laurus nobilis -- the kind you use the leaves for stews and soups?

I think it would like the liquid kelp sprayed on. That's helpful any time, really (maybe not for a day or two before harvesting if this is the culinary kind :wink: )

Check though for scale insects, mealy bugs, etc. sucking insects under the leaves and along the stems, just to make sure.
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Itoero
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Re: Laurus

Here some photos...
Image
Image
Image

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Laurus

I don't know if it is just my old computer, but I can't see your photos.....

Especially when posting photos, it always helps to check Preview first, to see what it is actually going to look like.
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imafan26
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Re: Laurus

That's sort of what my plants look like when they get too much water. It may need to dry out. I see you have it in a plastic pot. My plant is older and bigger so it can handle more rain. I have mine in a clay pot. I have smaller ones in plastic but they have been repotted within the last few months. Eventually, any that I keep will go into a large clay pot.

Scale does not usually turn the leaf yellow. The scale and mites are usually on the undersides of the leaves or along the midrib of the leaf on the front. The tips may turn brown from insects sucking on it.
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applestar
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Re: Laurus

I can see the photos too.
I had the same thought as imafan that those leaves look like result of overwatering.
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Itoero
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Location: Belgium

Re: Laurus

The soil is very moist and it doesn't seem to dry out.
It's often 6 °C during the day and around 2°C at night.
Caan it help to put him in a different container with fresh(dry) potting soil? Or is that maybe to risky when it's still winter?

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applestar
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Re: Laurus

I think it would help to repot. If using the same potting soil as before, mix in 3:1 ratio with "sharp" sand (typically used for construction, patio/paver base, etc. or with Perlite (typically sold with potting mixes) or with small (fingertip size) bark chips/mulch (maybe found with orchid or bonsai supplies). Perlite makes the mixture lighter in weight which is better for carrying around or on a shelf, etc. but can cause the plant to fall over when top-heavy or windy.

Before using, thoroughly premix with tepid water so that the mixture is moistened but not soggy -- holding a handful will hold shape but fall apart and feel like wrung out sponge.

If this is a small enough container, after repotting, feel the weight of the container and plant by hefting it. This is your guide weight. When it's lighter than this, it needs to be watered.
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