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What Trees Closely Resemble a Black Walnut Tree?

Posted: Sat May 26, 2012 10:37 pm
by Crabgrass
I'm pretty sure I have a black walnut tree in my yard( which happens to be right where I put my raised veggies bed) Are there Any trees that closely resemble a black walnut? The branches look like a black wAlnut and it produced green pods last year so I'm pretty sure that's what it is but I'm hoping it's not so I don't lose all my veggies

Posted: Sat May 26, 2012 11:03 pm
by PaulF
A photo would pin it down, but if the tree has thorns it may be a Locust. There are Honey Locust that looks like a walnut. There is a thornless locust as well. If the tree had fruits it may be a Hackberry. Black Walnuts do not have pods. In the walnut family are other nut trees like Hickory, but probably not in Denver.

Posted: Sat May 26, 2012 11:18 pm
by rainbowgardener
You're referring to the idea that black walnut trees inhibit the growth of other plants? I think this is a bit over-rated. You didn't say how big your tree is. Obviously you aren't going to plant veggies right next to any big old tree, because they will be shaded out. But I have a huge old black walnut. Right under it, I have planted a hydrangea, a viburnum and a shade flower garden. All are doing fine.

Posted: Sun May 27, 2012 12:46 am
by Crabgrass
rainbowgardener wrote:You're referring to the idea that black walnut trees inhibit the growth of other plants? I think this is a bit over-rated. You didn't say how big your tree is. Obviously you aren't going to plant veggies right next to any big old tree, because they will be shaded out. But I have a huge old black walnut. Right under it, I have planted a hydrangea, a viburnum and a shade flower garden. All are doing fine.
The tree is actually right next to the bed, but with our exposure we get sun from 7 am to about 4 pm in that spot. Last year my tomatoes did ok( only my first year gardening so not sure what constitutes great) but I rotated the plants to allow for more sun( they got so big that they blocked the sun). I think I'm just being paranoid but I have big dreams for homemade salsa this year. I will post pictures of the tree soon

Posted: Sun May 27, 2012 1:43 am
by WildcatNurseryman
If the fruit was a pod similar to a bean and not a green ball about half the size of a tennis ball then it is not a walnut.

Posted: Sun May 27, 2012 1:49 am
by Crabgrass
WildcatNurseryman wrote:If the fruit was a pod similar to a bean and not a green ball about half the size of a tennis ball then it is not a walnut.
The pods were about the size of a kiwi, and lime green in color. I think I remember them being slightly fuzzy, and when I cut it in half it had a citrusy smell and was bitter tasting( yes I'm the idiot that tastes everything). The first year in our house the tree didn't drop any pods, it started last year... Late summer. The seeds look like catepillars

Posted: Tue May 29, 2012 1:42 am
by WildcatNurseryman
They first thing you described is the walnut with husk. The second thing you described is its bloom.

Posted: Tue May 29, 2012 7:25 am
by bangstrom
Walnut trees have a hard, round fruit with an obvious nut in the center even when young. If it is a walnut, the citrusy smell sounds more like an English walnut than an American black walnut but I wouldn't describe either one as as slightly fuzzy. American walnuts have a strong smell that I find unpleasant.

Posted: Tue May 29, 2012 1:08 pm
by lorax
Slightly fuzzy puts it into Andean walnut territory, with the citrus smell and bitter flavour inside the fruits when they're green.

Posted: Fri Jul 06, 2012 9:32 pm
by Midwestguy
I'm sure you have a Black Walnut or English Walnut tree there. If your veggies are doing fine now, then I wouldn't worry about it.
By the way, here is a direct link to a really good fresh salsa recipe. I don't put in as much jalapeno pepper as the recipe calls for though.

https://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Fresh-California-Salsa/Detail.aspx?prop24=etaf